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Ivy and Bean

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The moment they saw each other, Bean and Ivy knew they wouldn't be friends. But when Bean plays a joke on her sister, Nancy, and has to hide quickly, Ivy comes to the rescue, proving that sometimes the best of friends are people never meant to like each other. Vibrant characters and lots of humor make this a charming and addictive introduction to Ivy and Bean.


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The moment they saw each other, Bean and Ivy knew they wouldn't be friends. But when Bean plays a joke on her sister, Nancy, and has to hide quickly, Ivy comes to the rescue, proving that sometimes the best of friends are people never meant to like each other. Vibrant characters and lots of humor make this a charming and addictive introduction to Ivy and Bean.

30 review for Ivy and Bean

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

    Cute friendship story about two different little girls learning to appreciate each. I would have liked it better if Bean hadn't been such an obnoxious little brat. I liked Ivy but Bean I wanted to slap. I vastly prefer a child protagonist like Ramona who gets in trouble because of misunderstandings or poor judgment (in ways that are totally natural for a kid her age) rather than being deliberately bad. I had a lot more sympathy for Nancy the older sister and the "mean" neighbor than I did for Be Cute friendship story about two different little girls learning to appreciate each. I would have liked it better if Bean hadn't been such an obnoxious little brat. I liked Ivy but Bean I wanted to slap. I vastly prefer a child protagonist like Ramona who gets in trouble because of misunderstandings or poor judgment (in ways that are totally natural for a kid her age) rather than being deliberately bad. I had a lot more sympathy for Nancy the older sister and the "mean" neighbor than I did for Bean. My siblings and I weren't angels by any means but we were nicer to each other and other children, politer, and better behaved in public than this spoiled little rotter. Crawling under strangers' dressing rooms at the store? Climbing fences into other people's property? Stealing money? Digging mud holes in the lawn and tricking people into falling into them? Throwing a frigging bucket of live worms over someone in the house? Any one of these would have gotten us more punishment than Bean gets for all of them together -- which I would guess is the appeal for children, the idea of doing all these mean things and basically getting rewarded in the end (since she makes a friend and gets a laughable token punishment of not watching videos for the week). And I don't find any of the exploits funny except maybe Ivy pretending to be a witch, and that's been done better in earlier books. At least they only killed some worms and not the frog they wanted to catch! I wouldn't let my kids read this book, much less play with someone like Bean.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Lisa

    Reading the series with my 7 year old daughter. :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    I picked up this book because it landed on so many good children's book lists. And while it wasn't a terrible book, it wasn't very good either. The lone redeemable quality of the book was the friendship that developed between Ivy and Bean, when it initially appeared that the two had very little in common. Ivy was the prim and proper book-reader and Bean, the puddle-splashing rabble-rouser. However, it was what the relationship formed around that was troubling. The two become friends when Ivy help I picked up this book because it landed on so many good children's book lists. And while it wasn't a terrible book, it wasn't very good either. The lone redeemable quality of the book was the friendship that developed between Ivy and Bean, when it initially appeared that the two had very little in common. Ivy was the prim and proper book-reader and Bean, the puddle-splashing rabble-rouser. However, it was what the relationship formed around that was troubling. The two become friends when Ivy helps Bean escape punishment for one of the many instances when she torments her older sister. Bean then discovers that Ivy wasn't reading books because she was bookish, but because she is studying to become a witch. The rest of the book involves the two of them lying and causing trouble in their attempt to cast a spell on Bean's older sister. Kids will be kids, and that certainly involves their fair share of mischief. But unlike protagonists in other children's books (think Beverly Cleary's Ramona or Judy Blume's Fudge), Ivy and Bean revel in their misdeeds and are never called to account for them. Bean's mom even found it mildly funny that the girls threw worms in the face of her older sister. Don't get me wrong. Kids will enjoy the book. They'll learn new names to call their siblings, like tightwad, and hear many they are probably already familiar with, like dork. The question is whether or not you want to expose them to it. I'm glad that I read it before my children, because I choose not to. There's plenty of other good ones out there.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    I bought this book for my 5 year old niece and wanted to read it before giving it to her; WHAT an adorable little book!!! I loved reading it and she will love having it and learning to read it. It will be so much fun to get her the rest of the series!

  5. 3 out of 5

    Alexandra

    ** 3/5/17 $.99 for Kindle ** Cute. A day in the life of mischievous and imaginative girls. My tutoring student loved this book - she's in the 4th grade reading about at the 2nd grade level. Good early chapter book - font is large, frequent pictures.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Pershey

    I was pretty disappointed... I was hopeful that this series would help Juliette break out of her neverending Rainbow Magic obsession. She liked it, but I didn't. I guess I appreciate that the characters are fairly realistic children, and I did love the illustrations. But, an awful lot of unkind language (dumb, stupid, booger-head) and behavior. Not that I want all children's books to be moralistic, but really: I do not really need her looking up to a character who throws a handful of worms at he I was pretty disappointed... I was hopeful that this series would help Juliette break out of her neverending Rainbow Magic obsession. She liked it, but I didn't. I guess I appreciate that the characters are fairly realistic children, and I did love the illustrations. But, an awful lot of unkind language (dumb, stupid, booger-head) and behavior. Not that I want all children's books to be moralistic, but really: I do not really need her looking up to a character who throws a handful of worms at her sister's face and laughs about it, and worries only about how much trouble she will get into. Bean struck me as a smarter, meaner Ramona Quimby. I'd take Ramona any day. I might even prefer the rainbow fairies.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mariah

    "The moment they saw each other, Bean and Ivy knew they wouldn't be friends. But when Bean plays a joke on her sister, Nancy, and has to hide quickly, Ivy comes to the rescue, proving that sometimes the best of friends are people never meant to like each other. Vibrant characters and lots of humor make this a charming and addictive introduction to Ivy and Bean." This was a cute story and I excited to read it with my students.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Deb

    I am very mixed about this. It is a great starting point for beginning readers because of the illustrations on every other page, but it is definitely not a book I want to read to my daughter. Like with Junie B. Jones, I don't like reading out loud about girls who aspire to make trouble. But as a "see I'm not the only one" find for kids it has a place in comforting kids who feel misunderstood or alone or whatever. I will have to reread some Ramona books to see how I feel about those as a grown up I am very mixed about this. It is a great starting point for beginning readers because of the illustrations on every other page, but it is definitely not a book I want to read to my daughter. Like with Junie B. Jones, I don't like reading out loud about girls who aspire to make trouble. But as a "see I'm not the only one" find for kids it has a place in comforting kids who feel misunderstood or alone or whatever. I will have to reread some Ramona books to see how I feel about those as a grown up. I loved them as a kid. If I still love them as an adult, then I'll chalk Ivy and Bean into the not as good writing column as could be for this age and idea. Otherwise, I'll just admit I'm too old and praise this book more highly.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Coreena McBurnie

    I had heard so much about these books from kids. Last year, my son read all that he could get his hands on. My son's friends talk about them because their teacher is reading them to the class. They all say how much they love these books, how funny they are, how much they love when the teacher reads them. We were at the book store and my son wanted me to buy him one, so I did. When his older brother said: What do you want that for? It's a girls' book. My younger son turned around and said: No, it I had heard so much about these books from kids. Last year, my son read all that he could get his hands on. My son's friends talk about them because their teacher is reading them to the class. They all say how much they love these books, how funny they are, how much they love when the teacher reads them. We were at the book store and my son wanted me to buy him one, so I did. When his older brother said: What do you want that for? It's a girls' book. My younger son turned around and said: No, it's not. It's a good book. Now, my younger daughter asked me to read this one to her. She loves it. She begs me for "just one more chapter" and wants to read all of them. And, I have to admit, after years of reading books to my kids, I've found Ivy and Bean to be among the best of the early chapter books, and I can see the appeal for both boys and girls. Ivy and Bean don't think that they will ever be friends because they are so different, but when they get together for a common cause, they find that friendship is about more than being the same as someone else and you never know what will happen when you give people a chance. The book is also filled with humour and imagination. Ivy and Bean quickly create their own world, something which kids naturally do. The kids are also silly, get in trouble, get dirty... They do all of the things kids do. The illustrations really add to the book. There are pictures every few pages, simple drawings, but they also add to the tone of the story and make the book accessible as an early chapter book for kids. Even though this book is about two girls, I can see the appeal for boys too. It is simply a good book, as my wise son said.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    This is a great book for children, aged 6,7,8. Ivy and Bean are opposites...or at least Bean (born Bernice) thinks that they are. Until certain circumstances let her get to know Ivy better. The illustrations in this book are great, although sometimes ugly. There is one picture where Bean looks just like a demon, and it gives me the heebie-jeebies. The artist plays up Ivy and Bean's differences by representing them physically: Ivy is taller, with long, red hair. Bean is short and dark with dark, sh This is a great book for children, aged 6,7,8. Ivy and Bean are opposites...or at least Bean (born Bernice) thinks that they are. Until certain circumstances let her get to know Ivy better. The illustrations in this book are great, although sometimes ugly. There is one picture where Bean looks just like a demon, and it gives me the heebie-jeebies. The artist plays up Ivy and Bean's differences by representing them physically: Ivy is taller, with long, red hair. Bean is short and dark with dark, short hair. Bean is a total wild one. She loves playing with other kids, being outdoors, getting dirty, and playing practical jokes. She uses "rough" language for a kid, calling people dorks, turkeys, etc. She assumes Ivy is a wimpy priss just because she wears dresses and reads a lot. Ivy has a wild side, too. Because she reads a lot she has a lot of crazy ideas. She is teaching herself to be a witch. She goes around putting spells on people and plans to make a secret potion lab in her room. When Ivy and Bean meet up and slowly become friends, they are a force to be reckoned with. No one can stop them. They can take on the world together. The girls' thought processes, language, and conversations are very realistic and well-written. Barrows has done a great job of getting into a 7-year-old's mind.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shuhada Ramli

    A cute Juvenile literature. Fun and I should read this with my future daughter. LOL

  12. 3 out of 5

    Amy

    This book was recommended to my niece, nephew, and me by Cheryl in CCNV, and it was a good recommendation! My niece loved this book! I think she identified with the main characters. She understood their friendship and their motivations, and enjoyed the growth of their relationship. She was excited by the story almost immediately, and urged me to read multiple chapters to her in one sitting, which is rare. My nephew also listened to the story, and he seemed to enjoy it to a certain extent. He seem This book was recommended to my niece, nephew, and me by Cheryl in CCNV, and it was a good recommendation! My niece loved this book! I think she identified with the main characters. She understood their friendship and their motivations, and enjoyed the growth of their relationship. She was excited by the story almost immediately, and urged me to read multiple chapters to her in one sitting, which is rare. My nephew also listened to the story, and he seemed to enjoy it to a certain extent. He seemed to have a surprisingly good grasp on the complexities of the sibling relationship, and really seemed to identify with Bean's frustration with her older sister (no surprise there). He did tell me he didn't like the book, but for a four year old, he sure did sit quietly and listen to me read it! This was one of the more entertaining and compelling chapter books for budding readers that I've read in a long time. The girls are complex and realistic, and their friendship is endearing. The story is very well written, and there is a nice balance between pictures and text. I really enjoyed this book as a story. That said, though, the responsible adult in me noted that the girls do kind of push the boundaries of "acceptable behavior," so parents may wish to screen the Ivy and Bean books to determine if they are appropriate for their kids.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I made the mistake of not previewing this book before reading aloud to my kids! Someone recommended it to us, so I didn't hesitate to start reading this book with the cute cover. It starts out innocently about two very different girls who don't think they would like each other and then become good friends. That's about the only good thing about this book. Bean is trouble - she lies, steals & runs away. This book uses "name calling" words that I would rather not add to my children's vocabular I made the mistake of not previewing this book before reading aloud to my kids! Someone recommended it to us, so I didn't hesitate to start reading this book with the cute cover. It starts out innocently about two very different girls who don't think they would like each other and then become good friends. That's about the only good thing about this book. Bean is trouble - she lies, steals & runs away. This book uses "name calling" words that I would rather not add to my children's vocabulary: tightwad, freak, dork, crummy, burp face, wimp, goofy, pain in the kazoo, etc... I think you get the point! Also, Bean pretends to be a ghost as a practical joke & Ivy is trying to learn to be a witch. Between the witchcraft, name calling, bratty behavior and disrespect for other people; I naturally had to stop reading. I could only change so much on the fly as I was reading aloud. I asked my kids what they thought of the book and if I should stop reading. They both agreed that Bean was not kind and said some rude things. My 5 yo said, "This book is definitely not appropriate for us! Please stop reading!" I guess the only positive thing about this book is I taught my children how to discern whether or not a book is appropriate for them and it's ok to stop reading in the middle! I won't make this mistake again, ugh!

  14. 3 out of 5

    Carolien

    My nearly 8-year old enjoyed this story very much and found it very funny. She loved the cute illustrations and would go and back forth to check details as the story progressed. Ivy and Bean are two very interesting 7-year olds and I can see that we'll be reading many more of their adventures. I liked the fact that it is about friendship and the magic that forms part of every young child's imagination.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    I read this book to my five-year-old daughter, and we both giggled our way through the entire read. The dialogue and characters were delightful, but more than that, the book had a very good lesson--don't judge people based on appearances and pre-conceived notions. The main character, Bean, doesn't want to befriend her new neighbor, despite her mother's urgings, because she thinks the new gal is "boring" and too girly. By the end of the book, however, Bean and Ivy have become fast friends...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

    These are by far our favorite young-reader chapter books. The 8th book is our favorite--if you only read one of the series, read that one, it makes me laugh so hard I have to stop reading to catch my breath. We're always looking for another series as good as this one. Kate makes me read a chapter every night before bed, we work our way through all 9 books then start again.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    My daughter loves this series. At first the name calling the characters do seemed inappropriate but now I see it as realistic and the kids relate to it so c'est la vie.

  18. 3 out of 5

    Mela

    Ok. Probably it is a good book for kids, but (in my opinion) only for kids. I mean I wasn't interested in finishing it. You know, there are books for children which an adult has the same (sometimes even bigger) joy from (e.g. The Little Prince, The Princess Bride or Alice's Adventures in Wonderland). This one isn't one of them. Nonetheless, from what I have read it is a well-written book for kids.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Casey (caseydillabooks)

    Ivy and Bean get up to a lot of fun shenanigans but they have a lot of fun being disrespectful to other people!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Eleanor read these books... Dad: Eleanor, how long ago did you first read these books? Eleanor: Um... The first time I read it was when I was in Pre-School. ...Well, I listened to it when I was in Pre-School. Dad: How many years ago was that? Eleanor: Five. *I can't believe it's been five years since Pre-School. I can't believe it's been 5 years since she's first read these books. Crazy.* Dad: Eleanor, do you still like them? Eleanor: Yes. I do still like them. Dad: When was the last time you'd listene Eleanor read these books... Dad: Eleanor, how long ago did you first read these books? Eleanor: Um... The first time I read it was when I was in Pre-School. ...Well, I listened to it when I was in Pre-School. Dad: How many years ago was that? Eleanor: Five. *I can't believe it's been five years since Pre-School. I can't believe it's been 5 years since she's first read these books. Crazy.* Dad: Eleanor, do you still like them? Eleanor: Yes. I do still like them. Dad: When was the last time you'd listened to them before I read them out loud? Eleanor: Maybe when I was eight. ...Last year... *So, I checked out a whole bunch of books from the library - books I thought the girls would like. I knew Eleanor loved these when she was younger, so I checked the first one out.* Dad: I'm going to ask you all some questions about the book now, okay? All: Ok. Dad: Poppy, what was your favorite part of Ivy and Bean? Poppy: When they were getting the worms. Lah-Doe. ...Dad, I said Lah-Doe. Dad: *Laughs at the worms part... confused about Lah-Doe* Poppy, what does Lah-Doe mean? Poppy: Lah-Doe means that we get to have presents. When it's our birthday, I say "Lah-Doe" and then we get presents. So, when we're done eating cake, I say "Lah-Doe" that way we get presents. Dad: ... ...Ok. Gwen. *Poppy now has Gwen's ear, talking about rubber bands for some reason.* Gwen: My favorite part was *smiles really big* when Nancy wanted to get her ears pierced. Eleanor: Gwen! You have your ears pierced. Dad: Gwen, is that why you liked it? Gwen: Uhhhh.... Yeah. Dad: How old is Nancy? Gwen: Nine? Dad: So, did you like it because you're younger than nine, and you were already allowed to get your ears pierced? Gwen: Nooooo... Eleanor: Dad. Dad, wait. I think Nancy was eleven. Dad: Good to know. Gwen, so why did you like it then, if that wasn't the reason. Gwen: Because that makes the book more interesting. Dad: Do you think Nancy's parents should have let her get her ears pierced? Poppy: No. Gwen: ...Maybe? Poppy: Maybe. Maybe. Maybe. Eleanor: I was just thinking of There's a Boy in the Girl's Bathroom - the review we wrote for it. I was thinking of the asides you put on it, you put an aside that said, "scared" and you put in another that said "crammed on the bench," but Poppy hadn't really said that. Do you remember? I thought of Poppy saying the things that you put in the asides, but she didn't really say them. *The kids often try to add things to these reviews. Right now Gwen and Poppy are repeating, "Goo Goo Ga Ga" to try to get me to write it in the review, but it's not going to work.* Dad: Eleanor, what about you? Is your favorite part today the same as your favorite part when you read it five years ago, or has it changed... Or have you changed? Eleanor: ...I think I've changed some. And, I think that my. favorite. part. *thinking* is when Nancy danced on the worm pit. I didn't understand the dancing spell when I was younger. Five years ago, I thought that you put on a costume and the vest made you dance around. Dad: So, what really makes you dance around? Eleanor: The pit. Dad: What do you mean? Eleanor: I mean, like... Like you stand on the edge of the pit, then you kick your legs and waggle your arms. Dad: Why do you do that? Eleanor: I don't know. Maybe if you want to do the dancing spell, you stand on the edge of the pit and wave your arms and do the dancing spell. Dad: I don't think she was really dancing. Eleanor: Me neither. Dad: What was she doing? Eleanor: She was trying to keep her balance. Dad: Just checking. *Smiles to himself.* Dad: You know something guys? I liked this book more than I thought I would. Eleanor: I don't know why, but when I first read it, I was eating Cracklin. But every time I listened to it after that, I was eating a snack while I listened... and I felt like I was eating Cracklin, even if I wasn't. ...Hey... Do you remember at the end of CDs when it would say, "Thank you. For being a ReCORDed Books Reader?" Dad: Yeah. Eleanor: I think Ivy and Bean was one of those books. ...I always liked that. [image error]

  21. 4 out of 5

    Q_Barb

    This is a sweet story about friendship and how it can be found in people you might not expect or welcome into your life, and that it can be forged by letting your imagination go! Ivy and Bean are two little girls who live across the street from each other, with mothers who keep encouraging them to become friends. Bean who likes to climb trees, have adventures and says reading books makes her "jumpy" thinks that Ivy must be boring because she sits on her front porch in a dress reading books every This is a sweet story about friendship and how it can be found in people you might not expect or welcome into your life, and that it can be forged by letting your imagination go! Ivy and Bean are two little girls who live across the street from each other, with mothers who keep encouraging them to become friends. Bean who likes to climb trees, have adventures and says reading books makes her "jumpy" thinks that Ivy must be boring because she sits on her front porch in a dress reading books every day. But when Bean needs find refugefrom her older sister after a prank goes south, she finds herself at Ivy's. Ivy says she make the older sister do tricks through her magic, and the two dress her up complete with a wand, and find that they share a great imagination and can be friends. This is the first installment of a series by Annie Barrows with black and white drawings by Sophie Blackall. It is written with great humor, making it more inviting to young students, with good description of the actions of all the characters and lots of expressive dialogue, and for those reasons would be a nice example as a model text for writing, active reading, etc. Although all the characters are female, I think boys could still get involved in relationship between the two siblings, the humor of Bean's take on things and the blend of reality with imagination that enables to the girls to be friends and have adventures.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Kennett

    I listened to this story on CD. Ivy and Bean live on the same block and their mother's encourage them to become friends, yet both girl's are reluctant. They see each other as opposites. Ivy wears dresses often, reads many books and seems content entertaining herself, while Bean wears shorts and t-shirts, prefers to play in large groups of children of all ages, and constantly and often purposefully antagonizes her older sister. After a chance encounter, Ivy begins to help Bean hide from her parent I listened to this story on CD. Ivy and Bean live on the same block and their mother's encourage them to become friends, yet both girl's are reluctant. They see each other as opposites. Ivy wears dresses often, reads many books and seems content entertaining herself, while Bean wears shorts and t-shirts, prefers to play in large groups of children of all ages, and constantly and often purposefully antagonizes her older sister. After a chance encounter, Ivy begins to help Bean hide from her parents when she thinks she is in trouble. The girls learn that they do have some things in common, and they end up enjoying each other's company while making plans for their next adventure. I enjoyed this simple friendship story. When the girls were speaking, the dialog sounded real and their antics also seemed realistic for seven years olds. The dynamics of different relationships could be looked at with this book; te girls' friendship, the two sisters' relationship, how the mothers relate to the girls, even the grouchy neighbor whose yard the girls take a short-cut through. Although I enjoyed this story, I didn't particularly like listening to it on a CD. It was narrated by a young girl's voice and I found it hard for my mind not to wander. I would have liked different voices for at least the main characters.

  23. 3 out of 5

    Anu

    "Just ihana!" Samalla kadulla asustavat Isa ja Bea eivät ole halunneet tutustua toisiinsa äitiensä tuputuksesta huolimatta/johtuen. Kun tytöt sitten olosuhteiden pakosta joutuvat yhteen,niin yllätyksekseen he huomaavat löytäneensä todellisen sielunkumppanin. Rasavillillä Bealla on yhtä ja toista hampaankolossa rasittavaa varhaisteini-isosiskoa vastaan ja koska Isa aikoo isona noidaksi, on itsestään selvää, että inha isosisko päätyy monimutkaisten harjoitusloitsujen kohteeksi. Loitsuihin tarvitaa "Just ihana!" Samalla kadulla asustavat Isa ja Bea eivät ole halunneet tutustua toisiinsa äitiensä tuputuksesta huolimatta/johtuen. Kun tytöt sitten olosuhteiden pakosta joutuvat yhteen,niin yllätyksekseen he huomaavat löytäneensä todellisen sielunkumppanin. Rasavillillä Bealla on yhtä ja toista hampaankolossa rasittavaa varhaisteini-isosiskoa vastaan ja koska Isa aikoo isona noidaksi, on itsestään selvää, että inha isosisko päätyy monimutkaisten harjoitusloitsujen kohteeksi. Loitsuihin tarvitaan mm. kahmaloittain kastematoja ja muuta ällöä. Mielikuvitusta ja rohkeutta kummallakin tytöllä riittää siinä määrin, että seikkailuja on takuulla luvassa myös jatkossa. Plussana vielä kivat kannet, ilmeikäs kuvitus ja mukavan harva ja selkeälukuinen fontti. kohta 9v. testilukijani lukaisi ykkösen illalla ja kakkosen seuraavana aamuna, ja arvioi kysyttäessä kirjat "hauskoiksi". "Ihan outoja ne kirjan tytöt, mutta oli kivaa, kun niille sai nauraa." Ilmeikäs kuvitus sai myös lypsämättä kehuja ja hauskimpia kuvia ja ilmeitä käytiin vielä jälkeenpäin erikseen esittelemässä. Kakkosen vinkkauskassiin!!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    The main character Bean is one of the naughtiest children I've read about in awhile. I should have read the story myself before reading it with my daughter. I had to censor way too much of this book for a short 120 pager written for children. An example of a little girls making poor choices that hurt other people (stealing) and passing judgment with no information are not examples of a "heroin" I want to expose my daughters too. On a positive note my daughter thought it was super funny. But of c The main character Bean is one of the naughtiest children I've read about in awhile. I should have read the story myself before reading it with my daughter. I had to censor way too much of this book for a short 120 pager written for children. An example of a little girls making poor choices that hurt other people (stealing) and passing judgment with no information are not examples of a "heroin" I want to expose my daughters too. On a positive note my daughter thought it was super funny. But of course she did. She knew we were reading something that wouldn't normally have been pulled off the shelf. The book has sparked a lot of conversation about kindness and how NOT to behave. Bottom line, skip this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becky Long

    Ivy and Bean 2nd -5th grade Blackall used black and white pencil drawings to tell the story which I thought perfectly represented the relationship between Ivy and Bean. This color choice stood for the differences between the girls yet black and white compliment each other very well as do the girls. The sentences are longer and take up much of the space on the page. The friendship story line is one that any child could appreciate but young girls may be more attracted to this book merely due to the Ivy and Bean 2nd -5th grade Blackall used black and white pencil drawings to tell the story which I thought perfectly represented the relationship between Ivy and Bean. This color choice stood for the differences between the girls yet black and white compliment each other very well as do the girls. The sentences are longer and take up much of the space on the page. The friendship story line is one that any child could appreciate but young girls may be more attracted to this book merely due to the fact that the main characters are female. Science or Language Arts Language Arts Example: Students could write a story about how they met their best friends and describe in detail the characteristics that they like about that person.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    My daughter received the Ivy & Bean box set for her sixth birthday and we finished the first book in 3 nights. She loved it and cannot wait to start the next book. The concept of two very different little girls becoming close friends in spite of their differences is certainly attractive. I had to censor a bit of language in the book. There is a good amount of name calling (especially between Bean and older sister Nancy), and Bean is not particularly nice in the beginning of the book. My daug My daughter received the Ivy & Bean box set for her sixth birthday and we finished the first book in 3 nights. She loved it and cannot wait to start the next book. The concept of two very different little girls becoming close friends in spite of their differences is certainly attractive. I had to censor a bit of language in the book. There is a good amount of name calling (especially between Bean and older sister Nancy), and Bean is not particularly nice in the beginning of the book. My daughter thought the potty humor was absolutely hysterical - Ivy burps and pretends to gag to get out of a situation. Maybe the stories are more appropriate for a slightly older child, as this was my daughter's first exposure to certain pranks and to hostility between sisters (she is my oldest).

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    An endearing little story about Bean, her sister Nancy, and an across-the cul-de-sac neighbor, Ivy. At first, Bean thinks Ivy is boring, always wearing dresses and reading books. But when Bean finds out that Ivy is just as daring and devious as she is, they cook up some hair-brained schemes, potions, and spells. After all, it is all Bean's mother ever wanted...for Bean to be friends with 'the nice little girl' across the street. Ivy and Bean is a humorous, delightful story about the trouble two An endearing little story about Bean, her sister Nancy, and an across-the cul-de-sac neighbor, Ivy. At first, Bean thinks Ivy is boring, always wearing dresses and reading books. But when Bean finds out that Ivy is just as daring and devious as she is, they cook up some hair-brained schemes, potions, and spells. After all, it is all Bean's mother ever wanted...for Bean to be friends with 'the nice little girl' across the street. Ivy and Bean is a humorous, delightful story about the trouble two mischievous girls can get into when they put their minds together. The illustrations in the book add to the humor and dialogue with delightful black and white drawings.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Brown

    Ivy and Bean may seem like unlikely buddies, but they complement each other beautifully. Bean's mother suggests an idea that’s usually the kiss of death for a new friendship: Why doesn’t Bean play with Ivy, the new girl across the street? “She seems like such a nice girl,” says Mom. Seven-year-old Bean tells her mother she already has plenty of friends (“Nice, Bean knew, is another word for boring”). Full review: http://www.twentybyjenny.com/812Books...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    Ivy + Bean is a solid book for kids! I thoroughly enjoyed the girls' first adventure of transforming Ivy into a witch and concocting a plan to get back at Bean's sister, Nancy. I wish I had these books around when I was a kid, because I have a feeling would have eaten them up! While I'm a big fan of Judy Moody, Cam Jansen, Romona and Beezus, and Amber Brown, I think it's safe to say I'm adding Ivy + Bean to the bunch!

  30. 3 out of 5

    Shiloah

    I wasn't very impressed with this one. It's a mix of part Clementine (who we love!) and part Junie B. Jones (who is too bratty for us to enjoy). I didn't appreciate the negativity and revenge seeking, and fun in being bad. I'd much rather my kids enjoy books that teach uplifting topics or positive ways to work through troubles, trials, and difficulties.

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