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The "Hobbit" Companion

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In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. In The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien spun a clever web of wordplay and verbal hocus-pocus. Inspired by these linguistic games, master "hobbit investigator" David Day untangles the crafty puns and riddles, hidden meanings, and mythical associations that lie beneath the saga's thrilling surface. More than just a In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. In The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien spun a clever web of wordplay and verbal hocus-pocus. Inspired by these linguistic games, master "hobbit investigator" David Day untangles the crafty puns and riddles, hidden meanings, and mythical associations that lie beneath the saga's thrilling surface. More than just a delightful study of an author who deeply loved and understood the intricacies of the English language (Tolkien helped compile the prestigious Oxford English Dictionary), this magnificently illustrated companion charms with its own beauty and enhances our understanding of one of the world's great masterpieces. Starting with the word "hobbit" itself, this illuminating guide moves on to examine Bilbo Baggins, the Gollum and the goblins, hobbit heritage and history, Buckland and Brandy Hall, Gandalf, Shire Society, the Fellowship, and much more. Intriguing to the uninitiated and enchanting to the enthusiast, this sparkling companion enhances the enjoyment of Tolkien's dark, mysterious world.


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In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. In The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien spun a clever web of wordplay and verbal hocus-pocus. Inspired by these linguistic games, master "hobbit investigator" David Day untangles the crafty puns and riddles, hidden meanings, and mythical associations that lie beneath the saga's thrilling surface. More than just a In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit. In The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien spun a clever web of wordplay and verbal hocus-pocus. Inspired by these linguistic games, master "hobbit investigator" David Day untangles the crafty puns and riddles, hidden meanings, and mythical associations that lie beneath the saga's thrilling surface. More than just a delightful study of an author who deeply loved and understood the intricacies of the English language (Tolkien helped compile the prestigious Oxford English Dictionary), this magnificently illustrated companion charms with its own beauty and enhances our understanding of one of the world's great masterpieces. Starting with the word "hobbit" itself, this illuminating guide moves on to examine Bilbo Baggins, the Gollum and the goblins, hobbit heritage and history, Buckland and Brandy Hall, Gandalf, Shire Society, the Fellowship, and much more. Intriguing to the uninitiated and enchanting to the enthusiast, this sparkling companion enhances the enjoyment of Tolkien's dark, mysterious world.

30 review for The "Hobbit" Companion

  1. 3 out of 5

    Lucy

    This is literally gorgeous. If you read and liked The Hobbit at all I think you'll like this, Because I Did its frking amazing the quality alone of the edition of the book is A+ and everything in this is so interesting and detailed and Tolkien is genuinely Something Else andyouwontknowunlessyoureadthis the illustrations are really cool as well and really add to the atmosphere (tone?:)) of the book so too do the frkin like windy word parts they're stunning and well placed and I liked them. just i This is literally gorgeous. If you read and liked The Hobbit at all I think you'll like this, Because I Did its frking amazing the quality alone of the edition of the book is A+ and everything in this is so interesting and detailed and Tolkien is genuinely Something Else andyouwontknowunlessyoureadthis the illustrations are really cool as well and really add to the atmosphere (tone?:)) of the book so too do the frkin like windy word parts they're stunning and well placed and I liked them. just in general this is Fantastic and I'm glad I didn't go past this (soz maryam:)))))

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fabiola Castillo Autora

    encantador libro de ilustraciones preciosas, con una divertida serie de teorías filológicas acerca del origen de los hobbits en la mente del maestro. Ese libro y yo tenemos historia, lo leí un par de años después de leer el Hobbit en la biblioteca pública de San Bernardo, que tenía fantásticos libros en esa época. Amo la ilustración de Golum en su botecito, al igual que la de Smaug, que son des-demonizados (hasta lucen tiernos)

  3. 3 out of 5

    Britta

    When I first heard about David Day’s The Hobbit Companion, I was expecting just that – a companion volume to either Tolkien’s story or Peter Jackson’s film adaptations. However, when I opened my copy –a beautiful hardcover edition featuring some unique, eye-catching artwork by Dutch artist Lidia Postma – I was pleasantly surprised: instead of simply following the storyline of Tolkien’s book or Peter Jackson’s films, Day’s book focuses on the “verbal hocus-pocus” Tolkien used in both The Hobbit a When I first heard about David Day’s The Hobbit Companion, I was expecting just that – a companion volume to either Tolkien’s story or Peter Jackson’s film adaptations. However, when I opened my copy –a beautiful hardcover edition featuring some unique, eye-catching artwork by Dutch artist Lidia Postma – I was pleasantly surprised: instead of simply following the storyline of Tolkien’s book or Peter Jackson’s films, Day’s book focuses on the “verbal hocus-pocus” Tolkien used in both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. In essence, it is all about language and how Tolkien utilised it to create a story revolving around the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins. Day presents us with the “chicken and egg” riddle in his chapter on Bilbo: does a name describe its owner, or does the owner inspire the name? This becomes something of a recurring theme within the book, although as we progress, Day’s focus goes from the Hobbits to the other characters within the story, showing us how language helped create their roles. Regardless of whether or not you have any interest in language or linguistics, this is definitely a book worth reading. It is a remarkable attempt to see into the mind of the man who “discovered” Middle-earth and its inhabitants. In reading it, we gain some insight as to how the mythologies of other cultures inspired Tolkien, although it is sometimes unclear whether a given explanation has actually been made by Tolkien, or if it is just conjecture on Day’s part. While Day’s enthusiasm is rampant throughout, it still feels a bit impersonal when reading. One thing I would have liked to have seen is a preface by the author, or even a paragraph “About the Author” at the end of the book. Day has written many books on Tolkien, but aside from citing one of them in his Bibliography, there’s no mention of any of them. Minor quibbles aside, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Despite not being a step-by-step guide to The Hobbit, The Hobbit Companion will nonetheless provide you with a greater appreciation for the time and care Tolkien put into his stories. I look forward to reading whatever Day comes out with next.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kinturray

    “La verdad es que las palabras, como los anillos mágicos, tienen cierta voluntad o finalidad en sí mismas que las dirige a través de la historia” La palabra hobbit fue inventada por Tolkien, quien como buen filólogo se dedico a “investigarla” y a partir de ahí caracterizo o subcreo a los hobbits y su mundo. Este libro está dedicado a explorar los acertijos y juegos de palabras que como apasionado de estas, inspiraron a Tolkien. Merecen una mención aparte las ilustraciones y otros elementos gráfic “La verdad es que las palabras, como los anillos mágicos, tienen cierta voluntad o finalidad en sí mismas que las dirige a través de la historia” La palabra hobbit fue inventada por Tolkien, quien como buen filólogo se dedico a “investigarla” y a partir de ahí caracterizo o subcreo a los hobbits y su mundo. Este libro está dedicado a explorar los acertijos y juegos de palabras que como apasionado de estas, inspiraron a Tolkien. Merecen una mención aparte las ilustraciones y otros elementos gráficos autoexplicativos que aportan personalidad y vivacidad al libro. Puede resultar intrincado, hasta confuso para el lector que no esté familiarizado con El hobbit o El señor de los anillos pero sin duda invita a la lectura de los mismos. Para aquellos que ya los hayan leído es una delicia que desentraña la intrincada relación entre palabras de orígenes multilingües y el destino de los personajes. Además de reivindicar la brillante faceta de filólogo a la que el profesor de Oxford dedico la mayor parte de su vida. Para leer más sobre éste y otros libros pincha el siguiente link: https://elblogdekinturray.wordpress.c...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    This book is very special for me. I read it soon after finishing The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. And I guess one could say that these three books changed my life in a way I still can't believe myself. Had my parents known I would decide to become an English philologist after reading this book, I wonder if they would have bought it anyway. I hope they would. The book is interesting and easy to read. The illustrations are, of course, beautiful. As far as I remember, it was a very good introduc This book is very special for me. I read it soon after finishing The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. And I guess one could say that these three books changed my life in a way I still can't believe myself. Had my parents known I would decide to become an English philologist after reading this book, I wonder if they would have bought it anyway. I hope they would. The book is interesting and easy to read. The illustrations are, of course, beautiful. As far as I remember, it was a very good introduction to the academic world I would join years later. Though now I wonder if it would be enough for me nowadays, I definitely recommend it, especially for young people and any Tolkien fan that would feel too overwhelmed when presented with a more technical book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    As I've made it my mission this year to read as much Tolkien as possible, I thought David Day's companion piece would be a fun side venture. Day has clearly done his research, going into painstaking lengths to delve deep behind the names and words of Tolkien's characters, namely the Hobbits. This isn't the first time I've read this book, but it's the first time I have while working through The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illustrations are especially whimsical and a nice touch. A must-have for As I've made it my mission this year to read as much Tolkien as possible, I thought David Day's companion piece would be a fun side venture. Day has clearly done his research, going into painstaking lengths to delve deep behind the names and words of Tolkien's characters, namely the Hobbits. This isn't the first time I've read this book, but it's the first time I have while working through The Lord of the Rings trilogy. The illustrations are especially whimsical and a nice touch. A must-have for any die hard Hobbit fans.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah

    My copy of this book is special, in a way. When my parents bought it for me, it wasn't until they were at the checkout that it was discovered that the cover is upside down and backwards, compared with the inside. So, when I read it normally, it looks like I'm reading it upside down. Go figure.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mr.

    Philology is awesome.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    A must for all J R R Tolkien readers. I think it best to quote from the publisher: Illustrated in full colour (illustrations by Lidia Postma), including a number of double page prints, this is an intriguing and interesting investigation into the world of words used by Tolkien in The Hobbit. It explores the clever web of wordplay Professor Tolkien used to create hidden meanings and delves into the mythical associations that lie beneath the tale's thrilling surface. Starting with the word "hobbit" it A must for all J R R Tolkien readers. I think it best to quote from the publisher: Illustrated in full colour (illustrations by Lidia Postma), including a number of double page prints, this is an intriguing and interesting investigation into the world of words used by Tolkien in The Hobbit. It explores the clever web of wordplay Professor Tolkien used to create hidden meanings and delves into the mythical associations that lie beneath the tale's thrilling surface. Starting with the word "hobbit" itself, the book moves on to examine Bilbo Baggins, hobbit heritage and history, Gandalf, Shire Society, and much more. There is also a chapter on the hobbit characters from The Lord of the Rings, including Frodo, Sam, Pippin and Merry. Lidia Postma’s painting of the Party Field from The Fellowship of the Rin is a treasure – it pictures and names 60 of the guests from Adelard Took to Willibald Bolger.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo

    One could certainly accuse David Day and Christopher Tolkien of making a living out of J.R.R. Tolkien's work, but at least they constatly put out interesting additions to the Middle-Earth legacy. And this book is a particularly entertaining and illuminating compendium of the linguistic undercurrents that provide a delightful background to the adventures of hobbits and other races of Middle-Earth. Additionally, it's beautifully illustrated and it doesn't recourse to the more known Tolkien illustr One could certainly accuse David Day and Christopher Tolkien of making a living out of J.R.R. Tolkien's work, but at least they constatly put out interesting additions to the Middle-Earth legacy. And this book is a particularly entertaining and illuminating compendium of the linguistic undercurrents that provide a delightful background to the adventures of hobbits and other races of Middle-Earth. Additionally, it's beautifully illustrated and it doesn't recourse to the more known Tolkien illustrators (I love Alan Lee's work, but one does get a little tired of seeing his work or John Howe's in almost everything Tolkien-related).

  11. 3 out of 5

    Aleta

    Very interesting analysis of the linguistics that drove J.R.R. Tolkien's characterizations and even plotting of The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    This is an accessible and illuminating exploration of the various ways Tolkien uses multiple punning as the basis of character names and actions. While this could have been a conventional academic study, it is instead a lavishly illustrated, pleasant read, aimed at the general reader but full of fascinating information.

  13. 3 out of 5

    Carlita MF

    El libro es una delicia. Las ilustraciones son hermosas y el estilo del libro es sencillo de seguir, te atrapa con los datos y la información, llevándote por el mundo de los hobbits. Muy interesante todo lo que se indica y de verdad, para los fanáticos de Tolkien, este libro entrega mucha información etimológica muy interesante acerca de ese mundo lingüístico detrás de los regordetes Hobbits.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Theresa Ramseyer

    I had high expectations for this book. I usually like history and learning where words and things come from. Flipping through at the library, the artistry is cute, and close to what I had in mind as Hobbits before watching LOTR. But for some reason, again something I can't pinpoint, I struggled through the book. I started it several times, and finally managed to skim through to the end.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Abel

    En ciertos pasajes lo leí sólo por encima, pero es una opción muy interesante para profundizar el conocimiento del mundo de Tolkien. Centrado en la lingüística y el orígen de los nombres de varios personajes de El Hobbit y ESDLA

  16. 3 out of 5

    Talbot Hook

    Certain things about this book are quite good. Some illustrations, interpretations, and passages are very lovely, however, there is an unpleasant amount of speculation- about names, etymology, and the reasons behind Tolkien doing as he did. Also, three dollars, and autographed. :3

  17. 3 out of 5

    Tiina Tonttu

    As the two-star rating suggests, the book was okay. I had high expectations for the book, yet it failed to meet most of them. Despite my personal disappointment, the book is quite interesting for the readers who get a kick out of philology, historical linguistics, and/or etymology.

  18. 3 out of 5

    Sarah

    If you didnt know that JRR Tolkien was a genius, you do now. The man literally had a way with words.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Mark

    Beautiful art and musings on the possible linguistic puns and puzzles that may have inspired some of Tolkien's creations.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Nathalie

    Very interesting to read if you want to 'know' more about Hobbits and the genius J.R.R. Tolkien himself.

  21. 3 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    Se ve que le había pifiado poniéndolo como leído. Ahora lo pongo en "To read" como corresponde, a la espera de que algún día lo consiga y lo lea.

  22. 3 out of 5

    Eucaris

    It's great companion since it makes you suddenly realize things you didn't notice before, and I read it like in two hours :D

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marie Jenkinson

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Collins

  26. 3 out of 5

    Magda

  27. 3 out of 5

    Kate

  28. 4 out of 5

    Woo Jae

  29. 3 out of 5

    Bernarda

  30. 3 out of 5

    William Kang

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