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Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit

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He has hunted some of the most notorious and sadistic criminals of our time: The Trailside Killer in San Francisco, the Atlanta Child murderer. He has confronted, interviewed and researched dozens of serial killers and assassins, including Charles Manson, Richard Speck, John Wayne Gacy, and James Earl Ray - for a landmark study to understand their motives. To get inside th He has hunted some of the most notorious and sadistic criminals of our time: The Trailside Killer in San Francisco, the Atlanta Child murderer. He has confronted, interviewed and researched dozens of serial killers and assassins, including Charles Manson, Richard Speck, John Wayne Gacy, and James Earl Ray - for a landmark study to understand their motives. To get inside their minds. He is Special Agent John Douglas, the model for law enforcement legend Jack Crawford in Thomas Harris's thrillers Red Dragon and The Silence of the Lambs, and the man who ushered in a new age in behavorial science and criminal profiling. Recently retired after twenty-five years of service, John Douglas can finally tell his unique and compelling story.


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He has hunted some of the most notorious and sadistic criminals of our time: The Trailside Killer in San Francisco, the Atlanta Child murderer. He has confronted, interviewed and researched dozens of serial killers and assassins, including Charles Manson, Richard Speck, John Wayne Gacy, and James Earl Ray - for a landmark study to understand their motives. To get inside th He has hunted some of the most notorious and sadistic criminals of our time: The Trailside Killer in San Francisco, the Atlanta Child murderer. He has confronted, interviewed and researched dozens of serial killers and assassins, including Charles Manson, Richard Speck, John Wayne Gacy, and James Earl Ray - for a landmark study to understand their motives. To get inside their minds. He is Special Agent John Douglas, the model for law enforcement legend Jack Crawford in Thomas Harris's thrillers Red Dragon and The Silence of the Lambs, and the man who ushered in a new age in behavorial science and criminal profiling. Recently retired after twenty-five years of service, John Douglas can finally tell his unique and compelling story.

30 review for Mindhunter: Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit

  1. 3 out of 5

    Ana

    WARNING: LOOK AWAY IF YOU DON'T LIKE FBI AGENTS/SERIAL KILLERS/SUBURBAN WHITE GIRLS TALKING ABOUT FBI AGENTS/SERIAL KILLERS. I bought an obscene amount of romance novels this summer. How many have I read? Precisely none! My love affair with certain genres, romance in particular, has diminished over the years. I've outgrown it, so to speak. I can't believe it's come to this, but according to my friend, that just means I need to broaden my horizons. What have I got left? True crime, apparently. Fo WARNING: LOOK AWAY IF YOU DON'T LIKE FBI AGENTS/SERIAL KILLERS/SUBURBAN WHITE GIRLS TALKING ABOUT FBI AGENTS/SERIAL KILLERS. I bought an obscene amount of romance novels this summer. How many have I read? Precisely none! My love affair with certain genres, romance in particular, has diminished over the years. I've outgrown it, so to speak. I can't believe it's come to this, but according to my friend, that just means I need to broaden my horizons. What have I got left? True crime, apparently. For being such a scaredy cat, I sure do enjoy reading about serial killers and dead people. I’ve been eyeing this book for such a long time. I like weird things ok. Ever since I watched Forensic Files, also known as Medical Detectives, my life just hasn’t been the same. That show traumatized me but I couldn’t stop watching it. What's scarier than watching a documentary-style series about violent crimes? Reading about it. My paranoia doesn’t need this. But enough of my yapping. Mindhunter is a crime novel written by John E. Douglas, a former FBI agent. I think of him as a real life impersonation of Clarice Starling. Just doing his own thing, hating serial killers, fighting crime and saving lives. His relationship with Ted Bundy inspired (at least partly) the Hannibal Lecter-Clarice Starling scenes in Silence of the Lambs. (They've made Mindhunter into a Netflix series. Jonathan Groff is slaying) I knew the way these guys operated; I’d seen it over and over again. They had a need to manipulate and dominate their prey. They wanted to be able to decide whether or not their victim should live or die, or how the victim should die. They wanted to show me they were in total control, that I was completely at their mercy. The more I cried out, the more I begged for relief, the more I would fuel and energize their dark fantasies. If I would plead for my life or regress or call out for my mommy or daddy, that would really get them off. This was my payback for six years of hunting the worst men on earth. Mindhunter starts off with a bang. John is on the verge of death. He is being tortured. Or is it just a crazy dream? When your job is literally killing you, maybe it's time to think of a career change. But the problem is, he's in. So he can't just walk away. What exactly does a special agent/criminal profiler do? He puts himself in the position of the hunter. He goes inside the mind of a criminal. It isn’t always easy, and it’s never pleasant, putting himself in these guys’ shoes. Sometimes, the only way to catch them is to learn how to think like they do. He is part of the FBI’s National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime at Quantico. He is a profiler. A mind hunter. FBI’s modern Sherlock Holmes. Maybe his mother's maiden name had something to do with it – Holmes! Mr. Douglas has so many interesting stories, I don't know where to begin. He opens up about his troubled youth, his family, and the challenges of life as a newly-qualified FBI agent. Okay, I'LL STOP BEING A TEASE NOW. John has been dropping some serious serial killer knowledge. Ed Kemper (Ed Kemper with the fbi agents Ressler and Douglas) "I just wondered how it would feel to shoot Grandma." Interests: long walks on the beach, cocktails, shooting grandma, cruising the streets and highways in his car and picking up young female hitchhikers. I'm only half-trolling. Ed was a serial killer. A true psychopath. He butchered ten people. Including his mother and grandparents. John didn't harbor any illusions as to Kemper's character and psyche. He definitely saw Ed as a threat, but that didn't seem to be all he saw. He'd had many encounters with Ed, each one more interesting than the last. As bizarre and unbelievable as it sounds, he'd grown to like the serial killer. As much as you can say such a thing in this setting, I enjoyed being around him. I don’t want him out walking the streets, and in his most lucid moments, neither does he. (from the tv show) Charles Manson Interests: He's all about peace and love and flower power. Got a joint rolled for each and every one of y’all. I love Charles Manson aka hippie douche going off on John who just stares at him deadpan and remains completely unfazed. Come on hippie dude, you're not even a real serial killer. Every couple of years, Manson comes up for parole and has been turned down every time. His crimes were too publicized and too brutal for the parole board to take a chance on him. I don’t want him let out, either. But if he were released at some point, knowing what I do about him, I wouldn’t expect him to be a serious violent threat like a lot of these guys are. I think he’d go off into the desert and live out there, or else try to cash in on his celebrity for money. But I wouldn’t expect him to kill. The biggest threat would be from the misguided losers who would gravitate to him and proclaim him their god and leader. David Berkowitz aka "Son of Sam" Interests: guns, guns and more guns. John calls him emotionally undemonstrative, introverted yet outspoken. He was more of an assassin personality than a typical serial killer. He’s not a rapist or fetishist. As he himself said - I am deeply hurt by your calling me a woman-hater. I am not. But i am a monster. I am the son of Sam. I am a little brat. He had bright blues eyes that were always trying to pick out if someone was genuinely interested, or laughing at him. When he heard what I had to say, his eyes lit up. "Now you never had a chance to testify in court," I continue, "so all the public knows about you is that you’re one bad son of a bitch. But from doing these interviews, we know that there must be another side, a sensitive side, a side that was affected by your background. And we want you to have the opportunity to tell us about that." The killer who probably mocked the FBI the most was the 'Green River Killer'. John developed a profile of the suspect. The FBI launched one of the largest manhunts of the time in an effort to catch him. Try as they might, the detectives couldn't catch the killer. Time passed mercilessly. The killings continued. John was convinced they were not the work of a single man, but it turned out to be false in the simple case. He made them look like total fools. Sometimes the dragon wins. They don't catch them all. The ones they do catch have already killed or raped or tortured or bombed or burned or maimed, none of them is ever caught soon enough. John himself admitted that. (The Green River Killer has since been apprehended, and committed to prison). Several scenes in Silence of the Lambs were filmed at the FBI Academy in Quantico. He spent a lot of time with Scott Glenn, who played Jack Crawford - the special agent based on Douglas himself. Glenn was a liberal guy who believed in the inherent goodness of people. Until… I showed him some of the gruesome crime-scene photos we worked with every day. I let him experience recordings made by killers while they were torturing their victims. I made him listen to one of two teenage girls in Los Angeles being tortured to death in the back of a van by two thrill-seeking killers who had recently been let out of prison. Glenn wept as his listened to the tapes. He said to me, "I had no idea there were people out there who could do anything like this." An intelligent, compassionate father with two girls of his own, Glenn said that after seeing and hearing what he did in my office, he could no longer oppose the death penalty: "The experience in Quantico changed my mind about that for all time." I have the utmost respect for John. He pretty much knew the 'West Memphis Three' were innocent right from the beginning. He was one of Amanda Knox's earliest, most vocal supporters. He chilled with Ted Bundy and Charles Manson. The man is a rock star. John Douglas is haunted, however, by his own demons. His experience in law enforcement made him feel detached from his family. He became 'desensitized' from everday life – a defense mechanism of some sort, perhaps. How do you get inside the mind of a serial killer without sacrificing your ideals or losing a part of yourself in the process? I mean, who knows the answer to that question? Fictional characters based on J.D. -Jack Crawford from The Silence of the Lambs and Red Dragon -Jason Gideon and David Rossi from Criminal Minds -Special Agent Holden Ford from Mindhunter Mindhunter is not for the faint-hearted. I had to skip some of the parts of the story. It's truly amazing what these men (though I use that term loosely in this case) are capable of doing. It's a strange world we live in. Book playlist: Mikky Ekko - We Must Be Killers Placebo - Running Up That Hill Jaymes Young - I'll Be Good Zack Hemsey - The Way Zella Day - Shadow Preachers Lana Del Rey - Florida Kilos Halsey - Gasoline Mogwai - Auto Rock Kings of Leon – Closer Bastille – Of The Night (this book fits perfectly to the video) Fink – Looking Too Closely Balmorhea – Remembrance Billie Eilish - lovely (with Khalid) Metallica - The Unforgiven II The Hit House feat. Ruby Friedman – Hunt You Down

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lightreads

    So John Douglas is great when he’s talking about serial rape and child murder, and then he’s intensely obnoxious when he’s talking about anything else. So I guess it’s a good thing he mostly talks about rape and murder? And when I say “John Douglas,” by the way, I mean John Douglas or his co/ghost writer, because who knows who wrote what. All I know is when this book talks about crime, it’s focused and intelligent and compassionate. And when it’s talking about anything else – the FBI, his home li So John Douglas is great when he’s talking about serial rape and child murder, and then he’s intensely obnoxious when he’s talking about anything else. So I guess it’s a good thing he mostly talks about rape and murder? And when I say “John Douglas,” by the way, I mean John Douglas or his co/ghost writer, because who knows who wrote what. All I know is when this book talks about crime, it’s focused and intelligent and compassionate. And when it’s talking about anything else – the FBI, his home life, whatever -- I want to go hide under something to get away from the whining and the score-settling and the endless, endless, endless ego-wanking. It’s amazing that a guy whose entire vocation revolves around reading personality from behavior can’t read what he’s putting out in his own damn books. Oh, and he’s still incoherent about the death penalty, for anyone keeping score. So basically he needs to talk only and ever about human cannibals and child murder, because that’s way less uncomfortable than anything else he says, let me tell you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    This review is going to be as much about comparing it to the new Netflix series as it is the book itself. You have been warned. John Douglas was a FBI agent who spent most of his career working for its Behavioral Science Unit. Along with other agents Douglas interviewed a wide variety of violent offenders including such notorious figures as Charles Manson, Richard Speck, and David Berkowitz, and then he tried to apply what they learned to develop criminal profiles of active unsolved cases. If you This review is going to be as much about comparing it to the new Netflix series as it is the book itself. You have been warned. John Douglas was a FBI agent who spent most of his career working for its Behavioral Science Unit. Along with other agents Douglas interviewed a wide variety of violent offenders including such notorious figures as Charles Manson, Richard Speck, and David Berkowitz, and then he tried to apply what they learned to develop criminal profiles of active unsolved cases. If you’ve ever read the books of Thomas Harris like Red Dragon and The Silence of the Lambs or seen the movies or TV show based on them then you might be familiar with the character of Jack Crawford who was based on Douglas. Over the course of his career he worked on famous cases like the ‘80s Atlanta child murders and the Green River Strangler. This is your basic true crime stuff written by a law enforcement professional. Douglas gives us his background as a fairly aimless youth who ended up as an FBI agent by pure chance and found that he had a taste and talent for digging into the history of criminals to see what made them tick. The book mixes his war stories of cases he worked along with a fair amount of bitching about the criminal justice system, and a little griping about he sometimes felt ill-treated by the FBI. He sprinkles his story with tidbits of his meetings with serial killers, and brags a fair amount about how accurate his profiles turned out to be for several cases he worked. In fact, you sometimes get the impression that the only reason that there are active killers who haven’t been caught was because someone failed to heed his advice. In fairness, Douglas does spread a lot of credit around to his fellow agents and local cops he worked with over the years, and he goes out of his way to note that the agents of his department are essentially consultants who don’t catch criminals themselves. The guy did dedicate his professional life to studying the worst of the worst in the hopes of finding better ways to identify and catch them in the future. While that’s obviously a noble calling you do get a sense of smugness and self aggrandizement from him at times. You can tell that he gets a huge kick out of playing Sherlock Holmes and dropping predictions on people that turn out to be right, but there’s a notable absence of him ever being wrong about any of them other than minor discrepancies. What’s most interesting about this book is how it was adapted into the a TV series. The first season of the show is about the early days of the Behavioral Science Unit when they were still coming up with the terminology and methodology they’d use to research and study violent offenders in prison. Douglas and fellow profiler Robert Ressler have been turned into fictionalized characters, but the killers and their crimes are historically accurate. Many of the scenes and stories are drawn from this book, but using created characters as the leads frees them up to add more drama as well as pick and choose their spots on the non-fiction bits. So while Douglas certainly has had a colorful career and has many interesting things to say I found it a lot more satisfying as a TV show than a book. Also, if you’re watching and liking Mindhunter be sure to check out Zodiac which producer/director David Fincher also did.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Maria Espadinha

    Os Monstros da Vida Real Nós os humanos vimos geneticamente apetrechados com uma panóplia de sentimentos ditos negativos, que arruinam a paz alheia, bem como a de quem os pratica: A raiva, a inveja, o ciúme, o ódio e seus acólitos são belicosos e tendem a ser mortais em casos extremos. Porém, esse grupo de sentimentos malignos, coexiste com um outro constituído apenas por benignos: O amor, a compaixão, a empatia, a compreensão e seus afins, são os bons que interagem com os maus numa luta intemporal, Os Monstros da Vida Real Nós os humanos vimos geneticamente apetrechados com uma panóplia de sentimentos ditos negativos, que arruinam a paz alheia, bem como a de quem os pratica: A raiva, a inveja, o ciúme, o ódio e seus acólitos são belicosos e tendem a ser mortais em casos extremos. Porém, esse grupo de sentimentos malignos, coexiste com um outro constituído apenas por benignos: O amor, a compaixão, a empatia, a compreensão e seus afins, são os bons que interagem com os maus numa luta intemporal, sempre supervisionada por Sua Majestade, a Rainha Consciência. E enquanto todos os fiéis súbditos se submetem humildemente à autoridade da sua majestosa Líder, "reina a paz em Bagdad"... Porém, se um dos tais sentimentos ditos maléficos assume uma força tal que abafa os restantes, a Consciência é destronada, e a liderança transmuta para o mau da fita. Tem então início um reinado de perfídia criminosa, ao qual convém pôr termo com a maior urgência! Há que contratar um especialista para o efeito, um herói caçador de vilões, que no caso concreto, dá pelo nome de "criminal profiler". Todos nós nos revelamos nas nossas acções -- expomo-nos em tudo o que concretizamos; a nossa personalidade está lá e não escapa a um olhar analítico atento. A obra define o obreiro e o crime não é excepção! E é absolutamente extraordinário constatar como uma análise minuciosa dum crime (e quanto a mim é esta a componente mais empolgante de toda a narrativa), induz um perfil detalhado do seu praticante: É maníaco-depressivo? Suicida? Sádico? Com quem coabita? Como se relaciona com os outros? Em que raça se inclui? É alto? Baixo? Magro? Gordo? Em que faixa etária se situa? ............... Ao responder a estas e outras questões , o "criminal profiler" chega a um retrato muito próximo do sociopata, prestando um contributo inestimável na sua captura! "Mindhunter" é uma leitura dura, chocante!... Contém cenas cuja perfídia requintada, superam muitas das retratadas nos thrillers mais macabros. Os seus autores não são vampiros, zombies, nem lobisomens, mas são seres igualmente aberrantes — iníquos, perversos, brutais,... — são os Monstros da Vida Real! Vade Retro!!!...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    “Behavior reflects personality. The best indicator of future violence is past violence. To understand the "artist", you must study his "art". The crime must be evaluated in its totality. There is no substitute for experience, and if you want to understand the criminal mind, you must go directly to the source and learn to decipher what he tells you. And, above all: Why + How = Who.” Special Agent John Douglas is the man who helped usher in a new age in behavioural science and criminal profiling. W “Behavior reflects personality. The best indicator of future violence is past violence. To understand the "artist", you must study his "art". The crime must be evaluated in its totality. There is no substitute for experience, and if you want to understand the criminal mind, you must go directly to the source and learn to decipher what he tells you. And, above all: Why + How = Who.” Special Agent John Douglas is the man who helped usher in a new age in behavioural science and criminal profiling. With 25 years of experience and having hunted some of the most notorious criminals of our time, Douglas has a unique insight into the minds of serial killers. True crime is my thing. If someone can hold a conversation with me based on murder and serial killers, you are automatically my new best friend. So excitement was at an all-time high starting Mindhunter. I’m not one for binging TV shows, I usually like to prolong my enjoyment for as long as possible, but I just couldn’t help myself with Mindhunter on Netflix. The book had been on my wishlist for a while, but the show was the excuse I needed to finally get my hands on a copy. And the book really delivers!! There’s a lot of murder within these pages. A lot. And no details are spared. Douglas covers a range of different topics related to criminal profiling – whether it be his thoughts on why there aren’t really many female serial killers, or if such monsters can ever really truly be rehabilitated and let back into society. There isn’t really a distinct structure to the book, the first 100 pages are basically a background to his career and how he got to be at the forefront for the initiation of what is now known as the Behavioural Analysis Unit. I mean, I guess the rest of the book is semi-chronological, but he will often discuss similar crimes together. This brings me to John Douglas himself. He is clearly a genius when it comes to his area, he knows what he’s doing, and I’m pretty sure there aren’t many who have a better insight into the minds of serial killers. However, he is a bit arrogant at times and I found myself rolling my eyes - “yeah John, you’re always right. Uh huh. If you had been involved they would have caught him sooner. Yep. You’re right.” Off the top of my head, I can’t think of any scenario in which Douglas admits he was wrong about something? I discussed this with Matthew and he said about how he read somewhere that often these kinds of people who spend a lot of time in the company of serial killers often begin to take on some of their traits – so perhaps this helps explain his arrogance. Or maybe you just gotta be like that in this line of work – I don’t know, but it was my nitpick for this book. At the time of writing, BTK and the Unabomber, along with a few others, had yet to be caught, but my edition had a new introduction at the beginning wherein they discuss these arrests and any other relevant updates. So if you’re interested in reading Mindhunter, I’d suggest trying to find an edition with this introduction. I’m actually surprised at how long it took me to read Mindhunter, I thought I’d just race through it, but it’s definitely the kind of book that you need to savour slowly. There’s a lot of detail and so much that I was trying to take in that I needed to really focus on what I was reading. Ultimately, it was worth it. I have a slight book hangover in that I miss ALL THE MURDERS *cries* but I guess I’ll just get my fix from podcasts for the foreseeable future. 4 stars from me! If you love true crime, this book is a must.

  6. 5 out of 5

    ✨ jamieson ✨

    the mindhunter tv show on netflix has literally both made and ruined my life i have so much uni work but all i can do is watch netflix listen buzzfeed unsolves: true crime JUST ended and mindhunter comes into my life? its like the universe is enabling my true crime interests naturally i have to further destroy my life and read the book

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy'sThoughts

    A Heads Up for the New Netflix Series, Mindhunter * * * * * Spoiler Free-Update- Netflix picked up this series and it looks like a possible November 2018 date for Season 2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I am always looking for something to catch my interest... and from the start Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris did it for me back in the day... I read the book and was stunned... and then the movie came out. It captured the feel of the book for me in so many ways. The all star cast of Jodie Foster, Anthony Hop A Heads Up for the New Netflix Series, Mindhunter * * * * * Spoiler Free-Update- Netflix picked up this series and it looks like a possible November 2018 date for Season 2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I am always looking for something to catch my interest... and from the start Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris did it for me back in the day... I read the book and was stunned... and then the movie came out. It captured the feel of the book for me in so many ways. The all star cast of Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins and Scott Glen will forever in our minds be the first to talk about and show what a serial killer can be... There was something about trying to get into the head of these types of killers... trying to see the why... even with all the horror surrounding them. It turns out, the prototype for Thomas Harris' FBI characters came from John E. Douglas. But like everything in this life... there has to be a start to a process and in the Netflix series, Mindhunter based on this series of books by John E. Douglas takes us back to the beginning... How the FBI came to discover and then research this new type of killing... nothing predictable, nothing the law enforcement had ever experienced before. It went against all the "Normal Predictors" and also against any of the ways society classified killers. These Real men (John E. Douglas and Robert Ressler) were treading new and undiscovered territory... learning and making mistakes but also new insights to how these killers came about. This series is not the flash/ bam, lots of excitement genre... It is a series that builds. The first episode is the set up and has much to lay out- the politics of the times, 1970's... the way the FBI behaves and what it expects from their people. You have the intro of the two men who take this journey into the unknown... one, Holden Ford played by Jonathan Goff , who is feeling his way and knows from his gut, there is something to this researching and talking to these criminals like people... to get them to reveal the whys of their crimes. The other man is the FBI's Behavioral Guy, Bill Tench played by Holt McCallany, a veteran who goes out across the country and teaches police departments the Who, What, Where of this new concept of the mind and how it is not "Just People Born Bad". As the series goes on we also learn more about their personal lives, the different decades and how the changes all around them impact everything. After a few entries, we met a Dr. Wendy Carr of Criminal Pathology, played oh, so well by Anna Torv of Fringe. She brings the added understanding of these men are on to something big... and works to develop a standard questionnaire for these killers. And here is the kicker... we go with these men when they interview these convicted killers. They are real cases...like Ed Kempler and Richard Speck. These exchanges are chilling yet also make one wonder how much is manipulated by these killers and how much is real... just like the characters in this series. So this is my little shout out to something that might interest you if you like these types of reads...TV Dramas, etc...It is not a fast paced series... but the details are there, the times of the 70's are there (I can say they held pretty true, as I lived them as a young teen...) and the lure of wanting to see how each of these men survive what they are experiencing. For more Reviews, Free E-books and Giveaways

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maria Espadinha

    Think Like One and Get Them What's that "thing" that thinks like a criminal, walks like a criminal, talks like a criminal, but doesn't act like a criminal (hopefully)? ???????????????? ??????????????? ??????????????? It's an FBI Criminal Profiler, what else?!... ;) GREAT BOOK :) P.S.: as you all noticed, the "walk like a criminal" and "talk like a criminal" were perfectly superfluous and irrelevant sentences, but they must be there for flavour and make the guessing game slightly challenging ;) :)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    I purchased this book recently having read the rave reviews received for the series of the same name on Netflix. I am an avid thriller reader and fascinated by most things related to crime so found this account by John Edward Douglas who is a former United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent and one of the first criminal profilers a very informative read. He recounts some of the cases he has dealt with, many of which are house old names such as Charles Manson and Ted Bundy and giv I purchased this book recently having read the rave reviews received for the series of the same name on Netflix. I am an avid thriller reader and fascinated by most things related to crime so found this account by John Edward Douglas who is a former United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) agent and one of the first criminal profilers a very informative read. He recounts some of the cases he has dealt with, many of which are house old names such as Charles Manson and Ted Bundy and gives fascinating insights into the mind of a serial killer. I found the book actually got better the more I read and I am now looking forward to watching the TV Series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    When I started sixth form college to begin my A levels I had this strange idea that psychology would be amazing, and I'd get to learn all about the criminal mind and my inner self. Funnily enough, after a week I realised it wasn't about this at all and I transferred to Geography instead (wise decision). I discovered this book, like most people at the moment, via the Netflix show of the same name, which I loved. And this book was similar in that it gave me everything I hoped I'd get out of that c When I started sixth form college to begin my A levels I had this strange idea that psychology would be amazing, and I'd get to learn all about the criminal mind and my inner self. Funnily enough, after a week I realised it wasn't about this at all and I transferred to Geography instead (wise decision). I discovered this book, like most people at the moment, via the Netflix show of the same name, which I loved. And this book was similar in that it gave me everything I hoped I'd get out of that class in sixth form. And more. It gives a broad insight into what makes a criminal behave the way they do, and how they'll behave after the crimes. As he describes himself, John Douglas is like a modern day Sherlock Holmes - taking minute details, and insignificant findings, to build a profile on what makes the mind tick. I was particularly compelled by the early sections with Ed Kempur, the differences between MO and signatures, and the sections on the Atlanta child killings and the use of profiling as part of the trial. Everyone has a stressor, and it got me thinking about my own personality in a way I've never done before. What were my stressors? What was my rock? It wasn't a perfect book by any means. John Douglas is clearly a deeply intelligent, insightful man. When he's talking about serial killers and rapists. When the story diverges slightly, or he's discussing other areas, he comes across as a bit full of himself. It's also a little dated in its discussions of the BTK and Green River Killers. I would have loved an 'update' with some insight from the author since their captures. Good solid read on an often disturbing topic that doesn't shy away from offering details to help explain behavioural patterns.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maria Espadinha

    How To Be A Criminal Profiler Imagine yourself thinking like a criminal! The moment you'll start doing it, it's like grabbing the key to the safe where he hides all his secret, devilish plans. You're gonna know where the hell he'll be next and what the f*** he'll be doing. And you could use that valuable information to get near enough to help him burn in his own flames, or, if you prefer a more succint, concise sentence, you'll have all it takes for a quite functional setup. So the question is, how How To Be A Criminal Profiler Imagine yourself thinking like a criminal! The moment you'll start doing it, it's like grabbing the key to the safe where he hides all his secret, devilish plans. You're gonna know where the hell he'll be next and what the f*** he'll be doing. And you could use that valuable information to get near enough to help him burn in his own flames, or, if you prefer a more succint, concise sentence, you'll have all it takes for a quite functional setup. So the question is, how can you start thinking like a criminal, without being one? And the answer is: you'll have to learn how to do it! Where? How? From Whom? .... The first criminal profilers belong to fiction. So I suggest you to start with the full collection of Auguste Dupin stories and later on, part to the legendary Sherlock Holmes. Edgar Alan Poe and Sir Arthur Connan Doyle, were reality creators. Their stories were intelligent and logical enough to be real, and in that sense, valuable tools to professional criminal profilers. So... after absorbing as much as you can from those masters of crime fiction, you'll have enough theoretical background to start your own investigations. Good Luck! ... By the way, if your middle surname happens to be Holmes, that may be regarded of considerable help! ;) P.S. : what I just told you, was not a product of my imagination. In fact, those were the first steps of the author himself, as a criminal profiler. All the rest came by itself, guided by practice and glimpses of natural talent!...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Whew, a thoroughly taxing, but absorbing read. Certainly a lot of information to be processed, and most of it not very pleasant. John Douglas relates in an almost casual, understated style his lifelong hunt for serial killers, kidnappers and rapists. Chilling and consuming, it provides some sharp insight into not only deviant behaviour, but human nature itself. Douglas is one of the fathers of modern day profiling. He was the model for Jack Crawford in The Silence of the Lambs. He interviewed and Whew, a thoroughly taxing, but absorbing read. Certainly a lot of information to be processed, and most of it not very pleasant. John Douglas relates in an almost casual, understated style his lifelong hunt for serial killers, kidnappers and rapists. Chilling and consuming, it provides some sharp insight into not only deviant behaviour, but human nature itself. Douglas is one of the fathers of modern day profiling. He was the model for Jack Crawford in The Silence of the Lambs. He interviewed and profiled such serial killers as Ed Kemper, Richard Speck, Charles Manson, Son of Sam, John Wayne Gacy and Ted Bundy. He was involved in the search for the Atlanta Child Murderer, Wayne Williams. At the time of his breakdown due to stress and a pressure-ridden lifestyle, he was profiling and tracking the Green River Killer and the BTK killer, plus a half dozen other serial killers at large. This is the reference book for the TV show, Mindhunter, brought to television by David Fincher, the director of Seven, Gone Girl, Zodiac and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. The show is excellent too, and this book is a great read for any serious fans of crime novels and detective stories. One of my best books of 2017.

  13. 3 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣

    Ok, this is pure wow. The fact that the author doesn't adopt the 'holier than thou stance' so common with law enforcement makes this an extremely enjoyable as well as worthwhile read. Q: In high school, I was already six foot two, which I used to my advantage. Talent-wise, we were a so-so team in a good league, and I knew it was up to the pitcher to try to be a field leader and set a winning tone. I had pretty good control for a high schooler, but I decided not to let the opposing batters know thi Ok, this is pure wow. The fact that the author doesn't adopt the 'holier than thou stance' so common with law enforcement makes this an extremely enjoyable as well as worthwhile read. Q: In high school, I was already six foot two, which I used to my advantage. Talent-wise, we were a so-so team in a good league, and I knew it was up to the pitcher to try to be a field leader and set a winning tone. I had pretty good control for a high schooler, but I decided not to let the opposing batters know this. I wanted to appear reckless, not quite predictable, so the batters wouldn’t dig in at the plate. I wanted them to think that if they did, they risked being brushed back or even worse by this wild man sixty feet away. Hempstead did have a good football team, for which I was a 188-pound defensive line man. Again, I realized the psychological aspect of the game was what could give us an edge. I figured I could take on the bigger guys if I grunted and groaned and generally acted like a nut. It didn’t take long before I got the rest of the linemen to behave the same way. Later, when I regularly worked on murder trials in which insanity was used as a defense, I already knew from my own experience that the mere fact that someone acts like a maniac does not necessarily mean he doesn’t know exactly what he’s doing. In 1962, we were playing Wantagh High for the Thorpe Award, the trophy for the best high school football team on Long Island. They outweighed us by about forty pounds a man, and we knew chances were good we were going to get the crap knocked out of us before a full house. So before the game, we worked out a set of warm-up drills whose sole objective was to psych out and intimidate our opponents. We formed up in two lines with the first man in one line tackling—practically decking—the first man in the other line. This was accompanied by all the appropriate grunts and groans and shrieks of pain. We could see from the faces of the Wantagh players that we were having the intended effect. They must have been figuring, "If these jokers are stupid enough to do that to each other, God knows what they’ll do to us." In fact, the entire episode was carefully choreographed. We prac ticed wres tling throws so we could appear to hit the ground hard, but without getting hurt. And when we got into the actual game, we kept up the general level of craziness to make it appear we’d only been let out of the asylum for this one afternoon and were going straight back as soon as the game was over. The contest was close all the way, but when the dust finally settled, we had won, 14-13, and captured the Thorpe Award for 1962. (c) Q: We come to St. Rita’s Church together, only she goes in to see the priest by herself first. It reminds me of the police station back when I was in college in Montana, when they separated all of us to check our stories. I’m sure they’re planning the conversion strategy. When they finally call me in, the first thing I say is, "What do you two have in store for the Protestant kid?" The priest is young and friendly, probably in his early thirties. He asks me these general questions, such as "What is love?" I’m trying to profile him, trying to figure out if there’s a particular right answer. These interviews are like the SATs; you’re never sure if you’ve prepared properly. We get into birth control, how the kids are going to be raised, that sort of thing. I start asking him how he feels about being a priest—being celibate, not having his own family. The priest seems like a nice guy, but Pam has told me St. Rita’s is a strict, traditional church and he’s uncomfortable around me, maybe because I’m not Catholic; I’m not sure. I think he’s trying to break the ice when he asks me, "Where did you two meet?" Whenever there has been stress in my life, I’ve always started joking around, trying to relieve the tension. Here’s my opportunity, I think, and I can’t resist it. I slip my chair closer to him. "Well, Father," I begin, "you know I’m an FBI agent. I don’t know if Pam told you her background." All the while I’m talking I’m getting closer to him, locking in the eye contact I’d already learned to use in interrogations. I just don’t want him to look at Pam because I don’t know how she’s reacting. "We met at a place called Jim’s Garage, which is a topless go-go bar. Pam worked there as a dancer and was quite good. What really got my attention, though, was she was dancing with these tassels on each of her breasts, and she got them spinning in opposite directions. Take my word for it, it was really something to see." Pam is deathly quiet, not knowing whether to say anything or not. The priest is listening in rapt attention. "Anyway, Father, she got these tassels spinning in opposite directions with greater and greater velocity, when all of a sudden, one of them flew off into the audience. Everyone grabbed for it. I leaped up and caught it and brought it back to her, and here we are today." His mouth is gaping open. I’ve got this guy totally believing me when I just break up and start laughing, just as I did for my phony junior high school book report. "You mean this isn’t true?" he asks. By this point Pam has broken up, too. We both just shake our heads. I don’t know whether the priest is relieved or disappointed. (c) Q: Then there was the Japanese police officer who had dutifully asked one of the other cops the protocol for greeting instructors one holds in high regard. So every time I saw him in the hallway, he would smile, bow respectfully, and greet me with, "Fuck you, Mr. Douglas." Rather than getting all complicated, I’d bow back, smile, and say, "Fuck you, too." (c)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jaya

    Wow!!! This was insanely fascinating. As a kid I used to watch Medical Detectives a series on Discovery channel which would re-enact a few of the true crimes and how the perpetrators were caught owning to forensic proofs and other tactics of solving them, primary among them would be "profiling" the perpetrator (s). The various kinds and number of cases that Douglas discusses in this book is somewhat alarming. If one is to consider the sheer amount crimes that happens across the world on a single Wow!!! This was insanely fascinating. As a kid I used to watch Medical Detectives a series on Discovery channel which would re-enact a few of the true crimes and how the perpetrators were caught owning to forensic proofs and other tactics of solving them, primary among them would be "profiling" the perpetrator (s). The various kinds and number of cases that Douglas discusses in this book is somewhat alarming. If one is to consider the sheer amount crimes that happens across the world on a single day, the world appears to be a dismal place to live! Nevertheless, a renewed respect to all the law and military persons who do what they do, to make us feel safe in our day to day life. Definitely recommended! WARNING: Descriptive passages of racial hate crimes, violence, rape, child abuse, physical abuse, foul language etc. . . . . . . . . . . . ...and now, off I go, to watch the netflix series because the cave I dwell in doesn't really intercept much of what is going on with the rest of the world

  15. 3 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    This is probably the true crime novel of all true crime novels, the one every fan of this genre should add to the top of their reading list. Mindhunter covers the story of several infamous criminals from "The Killer Clown" (John Wayne Gacy), to the pseudohippie Charles Manson. It was detailed, well-written and it shows how this crime until brought these criminals and many more to justice.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    John was one of the first agents to put together the skill of 'profiling' a crime in order to aid in catching the criminal that committed it. Very interesting stuff, and logical, too. You would think that cops, and others, would have 'seen' these patterns themselves. Maybe they did. But when the FBI moved the idea from a vague 'voodoo' kind of input to an actual crime solving tool, things began to gel into a fantastic weapon against killers/rapists/etc. Concise writing made the book easy to read, John was one of the first agents to put together the skill of 'profiling' a crime in order to aid in catching the criminal that committed it. Very interesting stuff, and logical, too. You would think that cops, and others, would have 'seen' these patterns themselves. Maybe they did. But when the FBI moved the idea from a vague 'voodoo' kind of input to an actual crime solving tool, things began to gel into a fantastic weapon against killers/rapists/etc. Concise writing made the book easy to read, and comprehend. I'm a true crime junkie, so, I was interested in reading the many excerpts from specific crimes that John had an active role in solving, or at least trying to solve. Some of the murders were solved after this book was first published, such as the BTK murders, and I read elsewhere that the updated editions include that information. 3 Stars = I liked the book. I enjoyed it. I'm glad I read it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    It is no secret that I am a fan of crime and thriller reads and am as fascinated as the next man as to what makes a murderer tick. One of those who took that very interest to the extreme was former FBI agent and criminal profiler John Edward Douglas. Over a 25 year career, he would encounter some of America's most dangerous individuals including Ted Bundy, Ed Kemper, Charles Manson, Richard Speck, and David Berkowitz to name a few. His conversations would provide an unsettling look into the mind It is no secret that I am a fan of crime and thriller reads and am as fascinated as the next man as to what makes a murderer tick. One of those who took that very interest to the extreme was former FBI agent and criminal profiler John Edward Douglas. Over a 25 year career, he would encounter some of America's most dangerous individuals including Ted Bundy, Ed Kemper, Charles Manson, Richard Speck, and David Berkowitz to name a few. His conversations would provide an unsettling look into the minds of evil and why they did what they did. While the book does not stay away from some of my banes of non-fiction such repeating oneself and telling us all how great you are, for the most part, this is an absorbing look at criminals and those whose jobs it is to get in their heads and identify them.

  18. 3 out of 5

    Bel Rodrigues

    Quando John está falando sobre criminologia e serial killers, ele fala de forma primorosa. Aborda assuntos e explana casos que resolveu enquanto trabalhava para o FBI, ou seja, o cara sabe do que tá falando. O meu problema com a narrativa começou quando ele precisava, em todo caso citado, falar do quão bom ele é (e de como ele mudou a história do FBI), srsly, qual a necessidade de afirmar e REAFIRMAR isso durante boa parte do livro? Qualquer pessoa, lendo o que ele estava escrevendo, notaria a g Quando John está falando sobre criminologia e serial killers, ele fala de forma primorosa. Aborda assuntos e explana casos que resolveu enquanto trabalhava para o FBI, ou seja, o cara sabe do que tá falando. O meu problema com a narrativa começou quando ele precisava, em todo caso citado, falar do quão bom ele é (e de como ele mudou a história do FBI), srsly, qual a necessidade de afirmar e REAFIRMAR isso durante boa parte do livro? Qualquer pessoa, lendo o que ele estava escrevendo, notaria a grandiosidade do trabalho dele. Essa autopromoção cansou muito, o que me levou a arrastar a leitura por um tempo. Segundo, eu não só discordo da opinião dele sobre jovens assassinos como também me admiro por uma pessoa que aparentemente entende tanto desse universo, pensar de forma tão sucinta e superficial: todos os assassinos são monstros por natureza. Como se não existisse uma sociedade doente ao redor deles, pais que os abandonaram, traumas passados, etc. Qualquer pessoa que trabalha com os chamados "delinquentes" sabe muito bem que são casos extremamente raros em que eles nascem assim. Eles merecem punição, sim, mas citar somente a ponta do iceberg me parece raso e um pouco amador. Tirando esses dois fatores, todo o resto do livro é muito, muito bom.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Raquel Moritz

    John Douglas e seu colega Robert Ressler foram as pedras fundamentais da análise comportamental como ferramenta de investigação do FBI e, por esse pioneirismo, a leitura é válida, mas é claro que outros livros, filmes e séries já abordaram o tema em mais detalhes após a publicação dessa obra (original de 1995). Recomendado pra quem curte o tema e está começando a ler mais sobre o assunto, e também pra quem quer um complemento da série da Netflix.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cheese

    Ok so I’m obviously late to the party on this, 20 years late. Like most people I heard about this after watching the Netflix show of the same name, directed by David Fincher (Se7en, Fight Club, Gone Girl and Zodiac). I really enjoyed the show and so I thought I’d give the book a go, to see how the facts match up from the show. Answer is the show is very accurate in most of it. Before we start - This book is non-fiction and they based the movie Silence of the lambs from some of their work. So the b Ok so I’m obviously late to the party on this, 20 years late. Like most people I heard about this after watching the Netflix show of the same name, directed by David Fincher (Se7en, Fight Club, Gone Girl and Zodiac). I really enjoyed the show and so I thought I’d give the book a go, to see how the facts match up from the show. Answer is the show is very accurate in most of it. Before we start - This book is non-fiction and they based the movie Silence of the lambs from some of their work. So the book, errrr wow. I wanted this book to never end. Couldn't put it down. So Mindhunter is written by an FBI agent who started a Behaviourial science programme within the FBI with a bunch of other agents in the late 70's to help deal with the increasing violent crimes in America. It was a very small team whom dealt with a very high workload. Their aim was to help local police in states all over America profile and prevent serious crime and often repeat crimes. Profiling if you don't know is "the recording and analysis of a person's psychological and behavioural characteristics, so as to assess or predict their capabilities in a certain sphere or to assist in identifying categories of people." - It's basically the opposite of psychotherapy. It's where you look at a person using psychotherapy techniques and reverse it to decide what they are capable of. I've had some training in this myself and it's really good in helping you understand why people can be absolute dicks or why you warm to some people and not others, it can also more importantly tell you a lot about yourself. So one day John Douglas (the writer) decided after speaking with his colleagues that instead of going by their experiences with murderers and rapists, why don't they go and interview these high profile killers/rapists to see what made them do it and why. What ensued turned the FBI into one of the most successful law enforcement agencies in the world specifically consultation. John Douglas was even consulted on the Yorkshire Ripper case ere in the UK. So John and his colleague interview, Ed Kemper, Charles Manson to name a couple and started building profiles of killers specifically SERIAL KILLERS. The more interviews they had the more breakthroughs they would have and Police all over the country started to get wind of their actions. Bear in mind this was in the late 70's the Police at first thought it was a load of 'Mumbo jumbo', but as time went on they started to make a huge difference in speeding up investigations and even help close old cases and help locate killers. The book itself is written by John Douglas and early on in the book you get to know that John has a talent for writing and telling stories, he really knows how to keep you engaged in the story and manages to fit in a lot of cases all very interesting and different in their own right from the Unabomber, to stalking president Reagan, to the green river killer and summer of Sam to name a few. There was even a case of a woman who faked kidnapping of her own child and killed and buried him so she could enjoy her single life again. Some unbelievable people. What this book does though is help you understand “why?”, which is a very important question. It also addresses the moral question of the death penalty and rehabilitation. If you're looking for cause, basically everything comes back to nurture NOT nature. A fantastic read which I would recommend to anyone.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    I must say, this book is a mixed bag. The story of the development of criminal profiling is certainly an interesting one, but I don't believe that Mr. Douglas deserves quite as much credit as he is willing to give himself. He also freely characterizes the killers in this book as monsters. Having worked with a number of this kind of person, I tend to see them more as broken human beings who deserve to be punished. The "monster" epithet implies that society has no responsibility in the way these k I must say, this book is a mixed bag. The story of the development of criminal profiling is certainly an interesting one, but I don't believe that Mr. Douglas deserves quite as much credit as he is willing to give himself. He also freely characterizes the killers in this book as monsters. Having worked with a number of this kind of person, I tend to see them more as broken human beings who deserve to be punished. The "monster" epithet implies that society has no responsibility in the way these killers turned out. That is not the case, All that being said, this book is a good enough read for an armchair detective.

  22. 3 out of 5

    Miz

    As a fan of criminal behaviour studies and of the literature surrounding it (including Silence of the Lands and Criminal Minds), this was a fascinating read for me. I did feel like it read as a bit boastful but if I had set the department up then maybe I would boast about it :) I want to know when this type of profiling DOESN'T work, but also more modern cases. Sequel please :)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    I liked this book. John Douglas was one of the original profilers in the FBI and spent a lot of time interviewing these criminals and studying them. As well as getting gravely ill while working on the Green River Case. I think it would be really hard to separate from the evil they see.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Tenho de começar com esta passagem. "Perguntam-nos por que razão é o crime real tão empolgante para os leitores espectadores... Cremos que a reposta é que, pela sua própria natureza, o crime real lida com a essência e com os fundamentos daquilo a que de forma arrogante chamamos . Ou seja, os instintos e as emoções que todos sentimos: amor, ódio, ciúme, vingança, ambição, lascívia, alegria e tristeza, terror, desilusão, desespero e sentimentos de grandiosidade e de legitimidade pessoal... em muit Tenho de começar com esta passagem. "Perguntam-nos por que razão é o crime real tão empolgante para os leitores espectadores... Cremos que a reposta é que, pela sua própria natureza, o crime real lida com a essência e com os fundamentos daquilo a que de forma arrogante chamamos . Ou seja, os instintos e as emoções que todos sentimos: amor, ódio, ciúme, vingança, ambição, lascívia, alegria e tristeza, terror, desilusão, desespero e sentimentos de grandiosidade e de legitimidade pessoal... em muitos casos acompanhados de medidas iguais de desajustamento profundo e de autoaversão." Gosto cada vez mais de ver e ler sobre crimes reais. Costumo assistir a alguns canais no YouTube com relatados de crimes e sempre tive curiosidade sobre toda a história envolvente. O que aconteceu para o homem se transformar num monstro? Será que nascem assim? Será que todos passaram por um trauma na infância? Interessa-me sobretudo a psicologia da mente criminosa. Quando o livro "MIndhunter - Caçador de Mentes" chegou às minhas mãos fiquei em pulgas para pegar nele. Tinha assistido à série na Netflix baseada no livro, no inicio do ano, e adorado. Tinha visto opiniões no Youtube estrangeiro relacionadas com o livro e não podia ter ficado mais feliz por ver que a Editoral Presença tinha lançado a obra em Portugal. Acabadinho de ser editado, a edição está impecável e vale cada página. Quando John Douglas quis trabalhar a mente humana dos criminosos, de forma a estruturar uma analise detalhada e conseguir apanhar os assassinos antes de expandirem o terror, não teve o trabalho facilitado. O FBI não acreditava que a psicologia estava relacionada ou que podia ser traçado um perfil antes de apanharem o criminoso. John Douglas revolucionou a investigação ao desenvolver métodos para saber como funcionava a mente dos serial killers. Começou a trabalhar na década de 70, antes de existir o termo "serial killer". Ele estudou diversos casos e investigou vários assassinos e torturadores. Esteve na prisão de frente com os mais temidos criminosos de forma aprofundar os seus conhecimentos e descobrir pormenores importantes para acrescentar à sua analise. Foi um homem muito importante na formação de vários agentes e na melhoria das investigações. Muitos casos foram solucionados devido à sua inteligência e perspicácia. Neste livro conhecemos a vida do John Douglas, informações sobre a sua vida pessoal. Casar com um agente do FBI, ausente de casa a maioria das vezes, com a mente sempre a fervilhar, não é de todo fácil. Percebemos isso ao longo dos capítulos, ele não tinha praticamente vida pessoal. Estava demasiado envolvido com o seu trabalho. OS casos relatados neste livro são imensos. Tem histórias macabras de fazer arrepiar qualquer leitor. É imaginável a forma doentia com funcionava a mente destes assassinos. Mas Douglas sabia como fazer cada um deles escorregar nas próprias palavras, entendia cada detalhe e acabava por ter bastante sucesso na resolução dos crimes. O que mais me impressionou foram os padrões, os traumas de infância, a forma como os serial killers se relacionavam com a mãe. Cresciam em ambientes poucos hostis, com famílias disfuncionais. Na adolescência, através do comportamentos das suas mães, acreditavam não eram dignos de relações amorosas com outras mulheres por serem feios, rudes ou gordos. Douglas defende que estes homens não nascem monstros, considera que desenvolveram esse ódio contra as mulheres devido a traumas ocorridos na infância. Mas este é apenas um detalhe no meio de outras características desenvolvidas no livro. Optei por não focar esta opinião em nenhum caso em particular, mas os maiores crimes da história são relatados ao detalhe neste livro. Desde Kemper, Brudos, estrupador Ted Bundy, maníaco Charles Manson, assassino de crianças negras Wayne, Rissell que ficou conhecido por começar a matar aos 14 anos são uma pequena parte do que vão encontrar. Cuidado, contém descrições muito fortes e macabras. "Aquilo que tento fazer com um caso é recolher todos os indícios com que tenho de trabalhar - os relatórios do caso, as fotografias e as descrições do local do crime, os depoimentos das vítimas ou os protocolos da autópsia - e pôr-me mental e emocionalmente na cabeça do criminoso." Uma mão cheia de psicologia, explicações e detalhes interessantíssimos. Este livro é excepcional, acrescenta conhecimento e deixa um fascínio pela mente humana em qualquer leitor. Um dos meus preferidos deste ano, super completo, instigante e com uma narrativa que nos prende do inicio ao fim. Super recomendo.

  25. 3 out of 5

    Alex Hawkey

    This book is written buy one of the FBI's top profiles, John Douglas. The man has worked on the cases that are world renowned for being some of the most psychotic killings to date. He has researched killers and rapists, helped police officers catch the most dangerous of criminals, and taught local law enforcement how to pick out the warning signs of chronic offenders and dangerous people. This book tells of his life and how he came to be the man that would one day be the inspiration for Jack Cra This book is written buy one of the FBI's top profiles, John Douglas. The man has worked on the cases that are world renowned for being some of the most psychotic killings to date. He has researched killers and rapists, helped police officers catch the most dangerous of criminals, and taught local law enforcement how to pick out the warning signs of chronic offenders and dangerous people. This book tells of his life and how he came to be the man that would one day be the inspiration for Jack Crawford in "Silence of the Lambs". John Douglas makes many points in this book. He does not have one moral to the story. All these themes he explains through his stories and they seem to make him who he ends up being. One theme that life can turn on a dime. When he got kicked out of the Air Force, his life was not looking to good. He was living off of 7 dollars a week from the military and had an apartment the size of a closet. He ended up getting a job at a gym and "... met a guy at the club named Frank Haines who turned out to be an FBI agent… I was offered a probationary appointment at an initial salary of $10,869." (pg 42-43). Just like that his life was turned to criminal justice. A month or 2 before he had no money and his life was going nowhere. Then, he is apart of one of the most prestigious law enforcement agencies in the world. Life changes quickly. Another theme that I learned from this book, whether he learned it himself for not, was that the mind really does have an incredible amount of power over the body. John had been stressed about all the cases he had been working on in the FBI. The stress had been so great that he had contracted a virus that caused him to have a fever that cooked his brain at 107 degrees. He essentially had a stroke. The left side of his body was paralyzed. Many of his brain cells were dead. Somehow, he lived. But he lived angrily. He blamed the FBI for his sickness. They had worked him so hard and they should have known that it could kill a man. He got no apology. He was making little progress in rehabilitation and was worried he would never be able to work again. One day, he returned to Quanico and, spontaneously and genuinely, he “…got a standing ovation from these agents from all over the county.” (pg 11) He felt appreciated. He felt like he was apart of the family again. John then began to work harder at his rehabilitation and began work again full time a month after the applause. A man that was crippled was able to overcome on a great disability because he believed that people really did believe he did good work and he did it in a month. Amazing. I think anyone who is a police buff or a person very interested in criminal psychology. I say police buffs because this man was a high ranking member of the FBI and has a lot of insider information. People who want to know more about how the police view crimes would enjoy this. Also, anyone who wants to study criminal psychology would also enjoy this because John Douglas was an FBI profiler; he talks about the mindset of serial killers and regular offenders throughout the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. I think a fun fact about me is that the first time I ever contemplated being a psychologist (of any type, too) was when I started getting into serial killers. God, I was such a nerd about serial killer facts. I could tell you all about Ted Bundy’s upbringing, John Wayne Gacy’s crimes, Jeffrey Dahmer’s near miss with the police. I wanted to be a criminal psychologist. I wanted to be a profiler. Now, I see what John Douglas does as a whole bunc This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. I think a fun fact about me is that the first time I ever contemplated being a psychologist (of any type, too) was when I started getting into serial killers. God, I was such a nerd about serial killer facts. I could tell you all about Ted Bundy’s upbringing, John Wayne Gacy’s crimes, Jeffrey Dahmer’s near miss with the police. I wanted to be a criminal psychologist. I wanted to be a profiler. Now, I see what John Douglas does as a whole bunch of Freudian guesswork on par with dream interpretations and his id/ego/superego. Aka, a whole bunch of bunk. I literally just listened to a book by Malcolm Gladwell where he included a piece on Douglas that talked about the issues of profiling. (Link here.) I was impressed with how he covered why profiling is so cool and captures our minds — look at the popularity of shows like Criminal Minds and Mindhunter, the latter based off of Douglas’ life and work — and why it’s just wrong. Profiling takes highly unstable factors and pretends that their stable. It also makes highly variable statements that contradict one another so that if one’s right, holy shit, this is amazing!! I took a class where we talked about psychopathy. We spent no time talking about profiling. We just talked about stable factors that have been found and verified through studies. Why? Because it’s not verifiable. Douglas even mentioned that you can’t take profiling and look at it to create an algorithm. Since he was reading it, he sounded almost proud that a human beat a machine. However, if you can’t create some sort of algorithm to help make predictions, doesn’t it mean that the predictions are likely, well, unpredictable and made up? The most I can say for this book is that if I had read it a few years ago, I would have found it amazing. Now, I know that profiling is impressive but that’s just because it’s someone playing psychic but with a cloak of legitimacy surrounding it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    An interesting autobiographical type book detailing the authors career in the then new speciality of criminal profiling. This was an intriguing and detailed read as the author examines how profiling is developed and used to study the most depraved crimes. Notes are made of more notorious crimes and criminals and many more that are less well known but equally important nonetheless. Much of the writing is technical but still relatively easy to digest. As a reader from the UK, I found it particularl An interesting autobiographical type book detailing the authors career in the then new speciality of criminal profiling. This was an intriguing and detailed read as the author examines how profiling is developed and used to study the most depraved crimes. Notes are made of more notorious crimes and criminals and many more that are less well known but equally important nonetheless. Much of the writing is technical but still relatively easy to digest. As a reader from the UK, I found it particularly interesting how the FBIs profiling department developed and came to be. Drawing on his experiences of psychology, psychiatry and criminal behaviours, this was an enjoyable read for those interested in the serial offender phenomenon.

  28. 3 out of 5

    Steve Kemp

    John Douglas has one hell of an ego on him that is for sure ! He loves to take a lot of credit that is due a different person. Same goes for all of his other books. Usually some good stuff in his books ,but you have to wade through the ocean of bullshit to get to it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cata

    As primeiras páginas são uma seca,focando-se demasiado na vida pessoal do autor. A partir do momento em que conhecemos os casos, os assassinos, como foram apanhados e a contribuição que deram ao FBI o livro melhora imenso

  30. 3 out of 5

    Bean Delphiki

    If you're deeply fascinated by criminology (and you're curious about the history of profiling), or you're a big fan of John E. Douglas, this book might be worth checking out. If, on the other hand, you're looking for a straightforward presentation of serial offender types and example cases, you're going to want to skip this one. Douglas clearly fancies himself a bit of a storyteller, but he lacks any sense of drama or poetry that might make the book more readable. Instead, he comes off as a bit f If you're deeply fascinated by criminology (and you're curious about the history of profiling), or you're a big fan of John E. Douglas, this book might be worth checking out. If, on the other hand, you're looking for a straightforward presentation of serial offender types and example cases, you're going to want to skip this one. Douglas clearly fancies himself a bit of a storyteller, but he lacks any sense of drama or poetry that might make the book more readable. Instead, he comes off as a bit folksy, like listening to your grandfather tell stories about his boyhood at the Thanksgiving dinner table. He gives a lot of personal background, and background about the development of the FBI's profiling unit, and there's just that bit too much of it. Douglas tries to tie all this personal background to his work, as though each episode of his life had a moral and a lesson for him as a profiler. At many points, this stretches credulity, and only seems to have been included to justify telling the personal story in the first place. The cases themselves are described in a matter-of-fact way which spares no details. If you're used to true crime as a genre though, nothing about these descriptions should faze you. There's a nice variety and breadth to the cases he covers. Douglas has a few quirks as an author which annoyed me. First was his apparent unawareness of the length of his own book, and the necessity of keeping some threads together. Early on, he mentions that most serial offenders are male, and assures the reader that he will explain why later on. This explanation appeared only a few pages before the end of the book, long past the point where I'd given up hope of seeing it. Its placement - coming only after numerous chapters full of male offenders - is baffling. And for a reader unfamiliar with the explanation itself (we don't really know why most offenders are male), this would surely be incredibly irritating. Douglas is also in the habit of referring back to short examples he's given chapters beforehand. In a book full of this many names - names of offenders, names of victims, names of FBI profilers, names of cops - something like, "the Shawcross case I mentioned in chapter four," is going to lose the reader. It certainly lost me. He also has a tendency to refer to almost all offenders as "inadequate types." Over the course of the book, this started to seriously annoy me. Inadequate how? Inadequate at what? It doesn't seem to be any more descriptive than calling an offender a "loser." All of this aside, I found Mindhunter a worthwhile read. Some of the best parts of the books are his descriptions of talking to offenders directly, and the little things he learned from them about the way they thought about their crimes at the point of committing them. I appreciated his honesty when he talked about finding many offenders so likeable that he'd be inclined to distrust they were guilty if he didn't know the forensics. He also has excellent things to say about law enforcement crossing wires with mental health professionals. And while there seems to be some braggadocio to Douglas's descriptions of flawless profile after flawless profile, he comes off as a very decent man. He is commendably honest about the strain this sort of work puts on family life; he nevertheless also manages to convey what it is about profiling that drives people to continue work in this important field.

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