Hot Best Seller

The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

Availability: Ready to download

In Edward Fitzgerald's much-loved translation, "The Rubaiyat", the best selling poem of all time, with Attar's charming "The Bird Parliament".


Compare

In Edward Fitzgerald's much-loved translation, "The Rubaiyat", the best selling poem of all time, with Attar's charming "The Bird Parliament".

30 review for The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. I Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight The Stars before him from the Field of Night, Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light. II Before the phantom of False morning died, Methought a Voice within the Ta The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. I Wake! For the Sun, who scatter'd into flight The Stars before him from the Field of Night, Drives Night along with them from Heav'n, and strikes The Sultan's Turret with a Shaft of Light. II Before the phantom of False morning died, Methought a Voice within the Tavern cried, "When all the Temple is prepared within, Why nods the drowsy Worshipper outside?" III And, as the Cock crew, those who stood before The Tavern shouted--"Open then the Door! You know how little while we have to stay, And, once departed, may return no more." IV Now the New Year reviving old Desires, The thoughtful Soul to Solitude retires, Where the White Hand Of Moses on the Bough Puts out, and Jesus from the Ground suspires. V Iram indeed is gone with all his Rose, And Jamshyd's Sev'n-ring'd Cup where no one knows; But still a Ruby kindles in the Vine, And many a Garden by the Water blows, VI And David's lips are lockt; but in divine High-piping Pehlevi, with "Wine! Wine! Wine! Red Wine!"--the Nightingale cries to the Rose That sallow cheek of hers t' incarnadine. VII Come, fill the Cup, and in the fire of Spring Your Winter-garment of Repentance fling: The Bird of Time bas but a little way To flutter--and the Bird is on the Wing. VIII Whether at Naishapur or Babylon, Whether the Cup with sweet or bitter run, The Wine of Life keeps oozing drop by drop, The Leaves of Life keep falling one by one. IX Each Morn a thousand Roses brings, you say; Yes, but where leaves the Rose of Yesterday? And this first Summer month that brings the Rose Shall take Jamshyd and Kaikobad away. X Well, let it take them! What have we to do With Kaikobad the Great, or Kaikhosru? Let Zal and Rustum bluster as they will, Or Hatim call to Supper--heed not you XI With me along the strip of Herbage strown That just divides the desert from the sown, Where name of Slave and Sultan is forgot-- And Peace to Mahmud on his golden Throne! XII A Book of Verses underneath the Bough, A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread--and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness-- Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow! XIII Some for the Glories of This World; and some Sigh for the Prophet's Paradise to come; Ah, take the Cash, and let the Credit go, Nor heed the rumble of a distant Drum! XIV Look to the blowing Rose about us--"Lo, Laughing," she says, "into the world I blow, At once the silken tassel of my Purse Tear, and its Treasure on the Garden throw." XV And those who husbanded the Golden grain, And those who flung it to the winds like Rain, Alike to no such aureate Earth are turn'd As, buried once, Men want dug up again. XVI The Worldly Hope men set their Hearts upon Turns Ashes--or it prospers; and anon, Like Snow upon the Desert's dusty Face, Lighting a little hour or two--is gone. XVII Think, in this batter'd Caravanserai Whose Portals are alternate Night and Day, How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp Abode his destined Hour, and went his way. XVIII They say the Lion and the Lizard keep The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep: And Bahram, that great Hunter--the Wild Ass Stamps o'er his Head, but cannot break his Sleep. XIX I sometimes think that never blows so red The Rose as where some buried Caesar bled; That every Hyacinth the Garden wears Dropt in her Lap from some once lovely Head. XX And this reviving Herb whose tender Green Fledges the River-Lip on which we lean-- Ah, lean upon it lightly! for who knows From what once lovely Lip it springs unseen! XXI Ah, my Belov'ed fill the Cup that clears To-day Past Regrets and Future Fears: To-morrow!--Why, To-morrow I may be Myself with Yesterday's Sev'n Thousand Years. XXII For some we loved, the loveliest and the best That from his Vintage rolling Time hath prest, Have drunk their Cup a Round or two before, And one by one crept silently to rest. XXIII And we, that now make merry in the Room They left, and Summer dresses in new bloom Ourselves must we beneath the Couch of Earth Descend--ourselves to make a Couch--for whom? XXIV Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend, Before we too into the Dust descend; Dust into Dust, and under Dust to lie Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and--sans End! XXV Alike for those who for To-day prepare, And those that after some To-morrow stare, A Muezzin from the Tower of Darkness cries "Fools! your Reward is neither Here nor There." XXVI Why, all the Saints and Sages who discuss'd Of the Two Worlds so wisely--they are thrust Like foolish Prophets forth; their Words to Scorn Are scatter'd, and their Mouths are stopt with Dust. XXVII Myself when young did eagerly frequent Doctor and Saint, and heard great argument About it and about: but evermore Came out by the same door where in I went. XXVIII With them the seed of Wisdom did I sow, And with mine own hand wrought to make it grow; And this was all the Harvest that I reap'd-- "I came like Water, and like Wind I go." XXIX Into this Universe, and Why not knowing Nor Whence, like Water willy-nilly flowing; And out of it, as Wind along the Waste, I know not Whither, willy-nilly blowing. XXX What, without asking, hither hurried Whence? And, without asking, Whither hurried hence! Oh, many a Cup of this forbidden Wine Must drown the memory of that insolence! XXXI Up from Earth's Centre through the Seventh Gate rose, and on the Throne of Saturn sate; And many a Knot unravel'd by the Road; But not the Master-knot of Human Fate. XXXII There was the Door to which I found no Key; There was the Veil through which I might not see: Some little talk awhile of Me and Thee There was--and then no more of Thee and Me. XXXIII Earth could not answer; nor the Seas that mourn In flowing Purple, of their Lord forlorn; Nor rolling Heaven, with all his Signs reveal'd And hidden by the sleeve of Night and Morn. XXXIV Then of the Thee in Me works behind The Veil, I lifted up my hands to find A Lamp amid the Darkness; and I heard, As from Without--"The Me Within Thee Blind!" XXXV Then to the lip of this poor earthen Urn I lean'd, the Secret of my Life to learn: And Lip to Lip it murmur'd--"While you live Drink!--for, once dead, you never shall return." XXXVI I think the Vessel, that with fugitive Articulation answer'd, once did live, And drink; and Ah! the passive Lip I kiss'd, How many Kisses might it take--and give! XXXVII For I remember stopping by the way To watch a Potter thumping his wet Clay: And with its all-obliterated Tongue It murmur'd--"Gently, Brother, gently, pray!" XXXVIII And has not such a Story from of Old Down Man's successive generations roll'd Of such a clod of saturated Earth Cast by the Maker into Human mould? XXXIX And not a drop that from our Cups we throw For Earth to drink of, but may steal below To quench the fire of Anguish in some Eye There hidden--far beneath, and long ago. XL As then the Tulip for her morning sup Of Heav'nly Vintage from the soil looks up, Do you devoutly do the like, till Heav'n To Earth invert you--like an empty Cup. XLI Perplext no more with Human or Divine, To-morrow's tangle to the winds resign, And lose your fingers in the tresses of The Cypress--slender Minister of Wine. XLII And if the Wine you drink, the Lip you press End in what All begins and ends in--Yes; Think then you are To-day what Yesterday You were--To-morrow You shall not be less. XLIII So when that Angel of the darker Drink At last shall find you by the river-brink, And, offering his Cup, invite your Soul Forth to your Lips to quaff--you shall not shrink. XLIV Why, if the Soul can fling the Dust aside, And naked on the Air of Heaven ride, Were't not a Shame--were't not a Shame for him In this clay carcase crippled to abide? XLV 'Tis but a Tent where takes his one day's rest A Sultan to the realm of Death addrest; The Sultan rises, and the dark Ferrash Strikes, and prepares it for another Guest. XLVI And fear not lest Existence closing your Account, and mine, should know the like no more; The Eternal Saki from that Bowl has pour'd Millions of Bubbles like us, and will pour. XLVII When You and I behind the Veil are past, Oh, but the long, long while the World shall last, Which of our Coming and Departure heeds As the Sea's self should heed a pebble-cast. XLVIII A Moment's Halt--a momentary taste Of Being from the Well amid the Waste-- And Lo!--the phantom Caravan has reach'd The Nothing it set out from--Oh, make haste! XLIX Would you that spangle of Existence spend About the Secret--Quick about it, Friend! A Hair perhaps divides the False and True-- And upon what, prithee, may life depend? L A Hair perhaps divides the False and True; Yes; and a single Alif were the clue-- Could you but find it--to the Treasure-house, And peradventure to The Master too; LI Whose secret Presence, through Creation's veins Running Quicksilver-like eludes your pains; Taking all shapes from Mah to Mahi; and They change and perish all--but He remains; LII A moment guess'd--then back behind the Fold Immerst of Darkness round the Drama roll'd Which, for the Pastime of Eternity, He doth Himself contrive, enact, behold. LIII But if in vain, down on the stubborn floor Of Earth, and up to Heav'n's unopening Door You gaze To-day, while You are You--how then To-morrow, You when shall be You no more? LIV Waste not your Hour, nor in the vain pursuit Of This and That endeavour and dispute; Better be jocund with the fruitful Grape Than sadden after none, or bitter, Fruit. LV You know, my Friends, with what a brave Carouse I made a Second Marriage in my house; Divorced old barren Reason from my Bed And took the Daughter of the Vine to Spouse. LVI For "Is" and "Is-not" though with Rule and Line And "Up" and "Down" by Logic I define, Of all that one should care to fathom, Was never deep in anything but--Wine. LVII Ah, but my Computations, People say, Reduced the Year to better reckoning?--Nay 'Twas only striking from the Calendar Unborn To-morrow, and dead Yesterday. LVIII And lately, by the Tavern Door agape, Came shining through the Dusk an Angel Shape Bearing a Vessel on his Shoulder; and He bid me taste of it; and 'twas--the Grape! LIX The Grape that can with Logic absolute The Two-and-Seventy jarring Sects confute: The sovereign Alchemist that in a trice Life's leaden metal into Gold transmute: LX The mighty Mahmud, Allah-breathing Lord That all the misbelieving and black Horde Of Fears and Sorrows that infest the Soul Scatters before him with his whirlwind Sword. LXI Why, be this Juice the growth of God, who dare Blaspheme the twisted tendril as a Snare? A Blessing, we should use it, should we not? And if a Curse--why, then, Who set it there? LXII I must abjure the Balm of Life, I must, Scared by some After-reckoning ta'en on trust, Or lured with Hope of some Diviner Drink, To fill the Cup--when crumbled into Dust! LXIII Oh, threats of Hell and Hopes of Paradise! One thing at least is certain--This Life flies; One thing is certain and the rest is Lies; The Flower that once has blown for ever dies. LXIV Strange, is it not? that of the myriads who Before us pass'd the door of Darkness through, Not one returns to tell us of the Road, Which to discover we must travel too. LXV The Revelations of Devout and Learn'd Who rose before us, and as Prophets burn'd, Are all but Stories, which, awoke from Sleep, They told their comrades, and to Sleep return'd. LXVI I sent my Soul through the Invisible, Some letter of that After-life to spell: And by and by my Soul return'd to me, And answer'd "I Myself am Heav'n and Hell:" LXVII Heav'n but the Vision of fulfill'd Desire, And Hell the Shadow from a Soul on fire, Cast on the Darkness into which Ourselves, So late emerged from, shall so soon expire. LXVIII We are no other than a moving row Of Magic Shadow-shapes that come and go Round with the Sun-illumined Lantern held In Midnight by the Master of the Show; LXIX But helpless Pieces of the Game He plays Upon this Chequer-board of Nights and Days; Hither and thither moves, and checks, and slays, And one by one back in the Closet lays. LXX The Ball no question makes of Ayes and Noes, But Here or There as strikes the Player goes; And He that toss'd you down into the Field, He knows about it all--He knows--HE knows! LXXI The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it. LXXII And that inverted Bowl they call the Sky, Whereunder crawling coop'd we live and die, Lift not your hands to It for help--for It As impotently moves as you or I. LXXIII With Earth's first Clay They did the Last Man knead, And there of the Last Harvest sow'd the Seed: And the first Morning of Creation wrote What the Last Dawn of Reckoning shall read. LXXIV Yesterday This Day's Madness did prepare; To-morrow's Silence, Triumph, or Despair: Drink! for you know not whence you came, nor why: Drink! for you know not why you go, nor where. LXXV I tell you this--When, started from the Goal, Over the flaming shoulders of the Foal Of Heav'n Parwin and Mushtari they flung In my predestined Plot of Dust and Soul. LXXVI The Vine had struck a fibre: which about If clings my being--let the Dervish flout; Of my Base metal may be filed a Key, That shall unlock the Door he howls without. LXXVII And this I know: whether the one True Light Kindle to Love, or Wrath-consume me quite, One Flash of It within the Tavern caught Better than in the Temple lost outright. LXXVIII What! out of senseless Nothing to provoke A conscious Something to resent the yoke Of unpermitted Pleasure, under pain Of Everlasting Penalties, if broke! LXXIX What! from his helpless Creature be repaid Pure Gold for what he lent him dross-allay'd-- Sue for a Debt he never did contract, And cannot answer--Oh, the sorry trade! LXXX Oh, Thou, who didst with pitfall and with gin Beset the Road I was to wander in, Thou wilt not with Predestined Evil round Enmesh, and then impute my Fall to Sin! LXXXI Oh, Thou who Man of baser Earth didst make, And ev'n with Paradise devise the Snake: For all the Sin wherewith the Face of Man Is blacken'd--Man's forgiveness give--and take! LXXXII As under cover of departing Day Slunk hunger-stricken Ramazan away, Once more within the Potter's house alone I stood, surrounded by the Shapes of Clay. LXXXIII Shapes of all Sorts and Sizes, great and small, That stood along the floor and by the wall; And some loquacious Vessels were; and some Listen'd perhaps, but never talk'd at all. LXXXIV Said one among them--"Surely not in vain My substance of the common Earth was ta'en And to this Figure moulded, to be broke, Or trampled back to shapeless Earth again." LXXXV Then said a Second--"Ne'er a peevish Boy Would break the Bowl from which he drank in joy, And He that with his hand the Vessel made Will surely not in after Wrath destroy." LXXXVI After a momentary silence spake Some Vessel of a more ungainly Make; "They sneer at me for leaning all awry: What! did the Hand then of the Potter shake?" LXXXVII Whereat some one of the loquacious Lot-- I think a Sufi pipkin-waxing hot-- "All this of Pot and Potter--Tell me then, Who is the Potter, pray, and who the Pot?" LXXXVIII "Why," said another, "Some there are who tell Of one who threatens he will toss to Hell The luckless Pots he marr'd in making--Pish! He's a Good Fellow, and 'twill all be well." LXXXIX "Well," Murmur'd one, "Let whoso make or buy, My Clay with long Oblivion is gone dry: But fill me with the old familiar juice, Methinks I might recover by and by." XC So while the Vessels one by one were speaking, The little Moon look'd in that all were seeking: And then they jogg'd each other, "Brother! Brother! Now for the Porter's shoulder-knot a-creaking!" XCI Ah, with the Grape my fading Life provide, And wash the Body whence the Life has died, And lay me, shrouded in the living Leaf, By some not unfrequented Garden-side. XCII That ev'n my buried Ashes such a snare Of Vintage shall fling up into the Air As not a True-believer passing by But shall be overtaken unaware. XCIII Indeed the Idols I have loved so long Have done my credit in this World much wrong: Have drown'd my Glory in a shallow Cup And sold my Reputation for a Song. XCIV Indeed, indeed, Repentance of before I swore--but was I sober when I swore? And then and then came Spring, and Rose-in-hand My thread-bare Penitence apieces tore. XCV And much as Wine has play'd the Infidel, And robb'd me of my Robe of Honour--Well, I wonder often what the Vintners buy One half so precious as the stuff they sell. XCVI Yet Ah, that Spring should vanish with the Rose! That Youth's sweet-scented manuscript should close! The Nightingale that in the branches sang, Ah, whence, and whither flown again, who knows! XCVII Would but the Desert of the Fountain yield One glimpse--if dimly, yet indeed, reveal'd, To which the fainting Traveller might spring, As springs the trampled herbage of the field! ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش این نسخه: ماد فوریه سال 2004 میلادی در دفترم، دوازده نسخه از این کتاب مستطاب، هنوز هم هست؛ برای همین است که مشخصات نسخه های چاپ شده را، در این ریویو نمیبینید، بسیار زیاد است، و نوشتن تکه ای از پاره های نشر نیز، دردی را از پژوهشگران، درمان نخواهد کرد، و نمیکند؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش این فراموشکار از خیام دلآویز نیز، به دوره ی دبیرستان فیوضات تبریز برمیگردد، سالهای 1342 هجری شمسی به بعد، چند سال پیشتر، خواستم نسخه ی روانشاد: ادوارد فیتزجرالد را، با نسخه های کهن موجود در اینترنت، برابر نهم، و و برای خود پژوهشی کنم، شاید که گرهی گشوده شود؛ بیشتر نسخه ها را گرد آوردم، و صفحاتی چند از نسخه ی چاپ شده ی فیتز جرالد را نیز یافتم، سپس به نسخه های هدایت، و دیگران پرداختم، هنوز هم گاه، دستی بالا میزنم، و چند خطی مینویسم جامی­ ست که عقل آفرین می­زندش، - صد بوسه­ ی مهر، بر جبین می­زندش این کوزه­ گر دهر چنین جام لطیف، - می­سازد، و باز، برزمین می­زندش *** ای کاش که جای آرمیدن بودی، - یا این ره دور را رسیدن بودی یا از پس صد هزار سال از دل خاک، - چون سبزه امید بردمیدن بودی *** این کوزه چو من عاشق زاری بوده ست، - در بند سر زلف نگاری بوده ست این دسته که بر گردن او می بینی، - دستی است که بر گردن یاری بودست *** هرچند که رنگ و روی زیباست مرا، - چون لاله رخ و چو سرو بالاست مرا معلوم نشد که در طربخانه ی خاک، - نقاش ازل بهر چه آراست مرا خیام ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyam Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. The Slender Story of his Life is curiously twined about that of two other very considerable Figures in their Time and Country: one of whom tells the Story of all Three. This was Nizam ul Mulk, Vizier to Alp Arslan the Son, and Malik Shah the Grandson, of Toghrul Beg the Tartar, who had wrested Persia from the feeble Successor Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyam Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. The Slender Story of his Life is curiously twined about that of two other very considerable Figures in their Time and Country: one of whom tells the Story of all Three. This was Nizam ul Mulk, Vizier to Alp Arslan the Son, and Malik Shah the Grandson, of Toghrul Beg the Tartar, who had wrested Persia from the feeble Successor of Mahmud the Great, and founded that Seljukian Dynasty which finally roused Europe into the Crusades. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: این نسخه: در ماه فوریه سال 2004 میلادی این کوزه چو من عاشق زاری بوده ست در بند سر زلف نگاری بوده ست این دسته که بر گردن او می بینی دستی است که بر گردن یاری بودست خیام در دفترم دوازده نسخه از این کتاب مستطاب هنوز هم هست؛ برای همین است مشخصات نسخه های چاپ شده را در این ریویو نمیبینید، بسیار است و نوشتن تکه ای از پاره های نشر هم دردی را از پژوهشگران درمان نخواهد کرد، و نمیکند؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش این فراموشکار از خیام دلآویز نیز به دوره ی دبیرستان فیوضات تبریز برمیگردد، سالهای 1342 هجری خورشیدی به بعد، چند سال پیشتر نیز خواستم نسخه ی روانشاد: ادوارد فیتزجرالد را با نسخه های کهن موجود در اینترنت برابر نهم، و و برای خود پژوهشی کنم، شاید که گرهی گشوده شود؛ بیشتر نسخه ها را گرد آوردم و صفحاتی چند از نسخه ی چاپ شده فیتز جرالد را نیز یافتم، سپس به نسخه های هدایت و دیگران پرداختم، هنوز هم گاه دستی بالا میزنم و چند خطی مینویسم. ا. شربیانی

  3. 3 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Omar Khayyám was a Persian polymath, mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet. He wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, and music. His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings. Zamakhshari referred to him as “the philosopher of the world”. Many sources have testified that he taught The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Omar Khayyám was a Persian polymath, mathematician, philosopher, astronomer, physician, and poet. He wrote treatises on mechanics, geography, and music. His significance as a philosopher and teacher, and his few remaining philosophical works, have not received the same attention as his scientific and poetic writings. Zamakhshari referred to him as “the philosopher of the world”. Many sources have testified that he taught for decades the philosophy of Ibn Sina in Nishapur where Khayyám was born buried and where his mausoleum remains today a masterpiece of Iranian architecture visited by many people every year. Outside Iran and Persian speaking countries, Khayyám has had impact on literature and societies through translation and works of scholars. The greatest such impact among several others was in English-speaking countries; the English scholar Thomas Hyde (1636–1703) was the first non-Persian to study him. The most influential of all was Edward FitzGerald (1809–83), who made Khayyám the most famous poet of the East in the West through his celebrated translation and adaptations of Khayyám's rather small number of quatrains (rubaiyaas) in Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám.' ترانه‌ های خیام، اثر: صادق هدایت؛ کتابی مشهور است که ناشناس مانده؛ نسخه های چاپ شده را در این ریویو نمیبینید، بسیار زیاد هستند و نوشتن تکه ای از پاره های نشر هم دردی را از پژوهشگران درمان نخواهد کرد و نمیکند؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش این فراموشکار از خیام دلآویز نیز به دوره ی دبیرستان فیوضات تبریز برمیگردد، سالهای 1342 هجری شمسی به بعد، چند سال پیشتر خواستم نسخه ی روانشاد: ادوارد فیتزجرالد را با نسخه های کهن موجود در اینترنت برابر نهم و برای خود پژوهشی کنم شاید که گرهی گشوده شود؛ بیشتر نسخه ها را گرد آوردم و صفحاتی چند از نسخه ی چاپ شده فیتز جرالد را نیز یافتم، سپس به نسخه های هدایت و دیگران پرداختم، هنوز هم گاه دستی بالا میزنم و چند خطی مینویسم جامی­ ست که عقل، آفرین می­زندش، - صد بوسه­ یِ مهر، بر جبین می­زندش این کوزه­ گرِ دهر، چنین جام لطیف، - می­سازد و باز، برزمین می­زندش *** ای کاش، که جایِ آرمیدن بودی، - یا این رهِ دور را، رسیدن بودی یا از پسِ صد هزار سال، از دلِ خاک، - چون سبزه، امیدِ بردمیدن بودی *** این کوزه چو من، عاشق زاری بوده ست، - در بندِ سرِ زلفِ نگاری بوده ست این دسته که بر گردن او میبینی، - دستی ست که بر گردن یاری بوده ست *** هرچند که رنگ و روی زیباست مرا، - چون لاله رخ و، چو سرو بالاست مرا معلوم نشد، که در طربخانه ی خاک، - نقاش ازل، بهر چه، آراست مرا خیام ا. شربیانی

  4. 3 out of 5

    Manny

    I kept thinking about the Rubaiyat last week while I was translating Zep's Happy Sex. I understand that Fitzgerald's translation is extremely non-literal, and almost amounts to a new poem - there is a nice piece by Borges discussing this unusual collaboration between two poets from different cultures and centuries. But what are you supposed to do when you translate poetry? Literal translation seems pointless. I had similar problems while trying to translate Zep's sexy French jokes. If the result I kept thinking about the Rubaiyat last week while I was translating Zep's Happy Sex. I understand that Fitzgerald's translation is extremely non-literal, and almost amounts to a new poem - there is a nice piece by Borges discussing this unusual collaboration between two poets from different cultures and centuries. But what are you supposed to do when you translate poetry? Literal translation seems pointless. I had similar problems while trying to translate Zep's sexy French jokes. If the result wasn't sexy or funny, it seemed to me that I must have failed. Well, I've worked with machine translation for a while, and I suddenly wondered if the theoretical framework it gives you makes it possible to explore these issues in a more precise way. Here's a Powerpoint slide showing the fundamental equation of statistical machine translation, the technique which for example powers Google Translate: What this says is that decoding (translating) amounts to finding words (the e-best) which optimize the product of the translation model, P(f|e) and the language model, P(e). The translation model measures how likely it is that the translated words correspond to the original ones. The language model measures how plausible the translated words are per se. When translating literature, the language model should presumably take into account the genre. If you're translating a moving epic love poem, the language model should measure the probability that a string of words is a moving epic love poem. Similarly, if you're translating a sexy joke, it should measure the probability that a string of words is a sexy joke. The problem is that there's a tension between the translation model and the language model. If you optimize the translation model term, and get a very literal translation, you're going to be far from optimal on the language model term. Now (I'm thinking aloud here) why is the problem so acute when you're translating literature? It seems to me that the answer lies in the unusually strong constraints associated with the demands of literary text. Even requiring a text string to be a sexy joke is a strong constraint. Most literal translations, though they may be grammatical and even idiomatic, will have a low probability of being sexy jokes. By accepting a lower value for P(f|e), though, you have a better chance of improving your score for P(e). Your optimum tradeoff point is most likely going to have a lowish P(f|e), and hence be fairly non-literal. Requiring a text string to be a moving epic love poem is an exceptionally strong constraint. The probability that a literal translation is going to meet this constraint is vanishingly small. So the optimum tradeoff point will most likely have an even lower P(f|e), and hence be even less literal. Ah, my hands are getting tired from being waved around so much...

  5. 3 out of 5

    Foad

    تا قبل از این کتاب، خیام بیشتر کارکرد ابوسعید ابوالخیر رو داشت: یک اسم، که هر کس هر رباعی ای رو پیدا می کرد و نمی دونست شاعرش کیه، بهش نسبت می داد. رباعیات خیام تا قبل از این کتاب، ملغمه ای عجیب و غریب بود از رباعیات کفرآمیز در کنار رباعیات عرفانی، رباعیات تلخ اندیشانه در کنار رباعیات عاشقانه، رباعیات خوش باشی و فلسفی در کنار رباعیاتی که فقط قصد عبارت پردازی دارن، همه در هم و مخلوط. رباعیاتی که ادوارد فیتزجرالد (مترجم انگلیسی رباعیات خیام) ترجمه کرده و نشر هرمس چاپ کرده، همچین حالتی داره و آدم خ تا قبل از این کتاب، خیام بیشتر کارکرد ابوسعید ابوالخیر رو داشت: یک اسم، که هر کس هر رباعی ای رو پیدا می کرد و نمی دونست شاعرش کیه، بهش نسبت می داد. رباعیات خیام تا قبل از این کتاب، ملغمه ای عجیب و غریب بود از رباعیات کفرآمیز در کنار رباعیات عرفانی، رباعیات تلخ اندیشانه در کنار رباعیات عاشقانه، رباعیات خوش باشی و فلسفی در کنار رباعیاتی که فقط قصد عبارت پردازی دارن، همه در هم و مخلوط. رباعیاتی که ادوارد فیتزجرالد (مترجم انگلیسی رباعیات خیام) ترجمه کرده و نشر هرمس چاپ کرده، همچین حالتی داره و آدم خنده ش میگیره که چطور ممکنه این دو رباعی رو یه نفر گفته باشه. در نتیجه، مفهوم خیام برای مخاطب دویست سال قبل، به کلی متفاوت از مفهوم خیام برای ما بوده. رباعيات خيام چيزى شبيه به رباعيات ابوسعيد ابوالخير قلمداد مى شده، تا جایی که حتی ملاصدرا به عنوان یکی از عارفان بزرگ، تمام رباعیات خیام رو از حفظ داشته. اما بعد از این کتاب، ماجرا تغییر کرد. بعد از این کتاب، رباعیات خیام به این شکل یکدستی که امروز می شناسیم دراومد. میشه گفت خیامی که ما می شناسیم، با خوش باشی ها و تلخ اندیشی ها و طنزهاش، بعد از این کتاب صادق هدایت به وجود اومد. هدایت اومد از بین خیل عظیم رباعیات منسوب به خیام، تعداد انگشت شماری که در نسخه های قدیمی تر به خیام نسبت داده شدن و در نتیجه، معتبرتر هستن رو شناسایی کرد (سیزده رباعی) و دید مضمون تمام این رباعی ها مشترکه: رباعی هایی فلسفی، کفرآمیز، طنزآمیز، عشرت طلبانه، و همراه با اشاره هایی به نجوم. در نتیجه، شکل کلی تفکر عمر خیام و مضامین مورد علاقه ش رو با استفاده از این سیزده رباعی تشخیص داد، و بعد، با در نظر گرفتن این شکل کلی تفکر، باقی رباعیات رو غربال کرد: هر کدوم به مضمون اون سیزده رباعی می خوردن رو قبول کرد و هر کدوم که نمی خوردن رو رد کرد. در نتیجه، رباعیات خیام برای نخستین بار، یکدست شد، و خیام از یک اسم توخالی که هر رباعی ای رو بهش نسبت می دادن، به متفکری با اسلوب تفکر واضح و متمایز تبدیل شد، متفكرى كه امروز براى ما نماد شكاكيت، طنز، خوش باشى و بدبينيه. تا جایی که اطلاعات من قد میده، این تصحیح اولین تصحیح منظم از خیامه و تصحیح های معروف و معتبرتر فروغی و غنی، و بعدتر فولادوند و دشتی و دیگران، همه کمابیش متأثر از این تصحیح هستن و از همین شیوه برای تصحیح خیام استفاده می کنن. پ ن: بعداً جستجوی مختصری کردم، و دیدم که انگار اون سیزده رباعی که کلید شناسایی خیام هستن، اولین بار توسط علامه قزوینی در مونس الاحرار کشف شدن، و به عنوان معتبرترین رباعیات خیام معرفی شدن. صادق هدایت در تصحیح خودش، از این کلید که قبلاً توسط علامه قزوینی کشف شده استفاده می کنه.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Sir Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: در سال 1963 میلادی ؛ خوانش این نسخه : سال 1996 میلادی این گلستان مطابق با نسخه ی محمدعلی فروغی ذکاء الملک، همراه با ترجمه ی انگلیسی سر ادوارد فیتز جرالد و ترجمه فرانسه دکتر مهدی فولادوند به خط امیر احمد فلسفی با بهره گیری از آثار نگارگران معاصر Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Sir Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: در سال 1963 میلادی ؛ خوانش این نسخه : سال 1996 میلادی این گلستان مطابق با نسخه ی محمدعلی فروغی ذکاء الملک، همراه با ترجمه ی انگلیسی سر ادوارد فیتز جرالد و ترجمه فرانسه دکتر مهدی فولادوند به خط امیر احمد فلسفی با بهره گیری از آثار نگارگران معاصر ایران، آقایان: غلامرضا اسماعیل زاده، امیر طهماسبی، حسنعلی ماچیانی، عبدالله محرمی، هوشنگ نعمتی و رضا یساولی تدوین یافته است. بخش فرانسه و انگلیسی این کتاب مزین به آثار نقاشان برجسته ی مکتب صفویه، استاد رضا عباسی، افضل الحسینی و معین مصور میباشد، که در سال 1375 هجری خورشیدی توسط انتشارات فرهنگسرا یساولی با بهره گیری از خدمات لیتوگرافی کوه نور و فرآیند گویا در تیراژ 5000 نسخه در سازمان چاپ و انتشارات به زیور طبع آراسته و در صحافی گوهر تجلید گردیده است چند رباعی برگزیده جامی­ ست که عقل آفرین می­زندش، - صد بوسه­ ی مهر، بر جبین می­زندش این کوزه­ گر دهر چنین جام لطیف، - می­سازد، و باز، برزمین می­زندش *** ای کاش که جای آرمیدن بودی، - یا این ره دور را رسیدن بودی یا از پس صد هزار سال از دل خاک، - چون سبزه امید بردمیدن بودی *** این کوزه چو من عاشق زاری بوده ست، - در بند سر زلف نگاری بوده ست این دسته که بر گردن او می بینی، - دستی است که بر گردن یاری بودست *** هرچند که رنگ و روی زیباست مرا، - چون لاله رخ و چو سرو بالاست مرا معلوم نشد که در طربخانه ی خاک، - نقاش ازل بهر چه آراست مرا خیام ا. شربیانی

  7. 4 out of 5

    Foad

    آشنایی من با حکیم، بر می گردد به دوران کودکی. آن دوران که هنوز زیاد از شعر و شاعری نمی دانستم و اگر کتاب خیام، میان آن همه کتاب شعرِ کتابخانه ی پدرم توجه مرا جلب کرد، به خاطر طرح جلد رؤیایی اش بود: نگارگری ای که عده ای منجم دستار به سر را نشان میداد که با حیرت به آسمان سحر انگیزِ بالای سرشان نگاه می کردند. در پیش زمینه، پیری با موهای سفید وآشفته نشسته بود و لبخندی رندانه بر لب داشت. دستش را بالا آورده بود که یعنی: «می بینید که!» زیر نگارگری، مصرعی از حکیم نوشته بود که: اجرام که ساکنان این ایوانن آشنایی من با حکیم، بر می گردد به دوران کودکی. آن دوران که هنوز زیاد از شعر و شاعری نمی دانستم و اگر کتاب خیام، میان آن همه کتاب شعرِ کتابخانه ی پدرم توجه مرا جلب کرد، به خاطر طرح جلد رؤیایی اش بود: نگارگری ای که عده ای منجم دستار به سر را نشان میداد که با حیرت به آسمان سحر انگیزِ بالای سرشان نگاه می کردند. در پیش زمینه، پیری با موهای سفید وآشفته نشسته بود و لبخندی رندانه بر لب داشت. دستش را بالا آورده بود که یعنی: «می بینید که!» زیر نگارگری، مصرعی از حکیم نوشته بود که: اجرام که ساکنان این ایوانند. فضای خانه، همیشه مخالف علاقه ای بود که من بدون خواندن رباعیات خیام و تنها با دیدن نگارگری های موجود در کتاب، به او پیدا کرده بودم. همه او را زندیق و می خواره می خواندند. این تصویر منفی، تا سال ها در ذهن من باقی ماند. گذشت، تا سال ها بعد، سه رباعی از خیام را در کتاب ادبیات فارسی خواندم. اولین رباعی هایی بود که از او می خواندم و به کلی، مغایر تصویری که از او در ذهنم بود. هیچ معنای خلافی در آن ها نیافتم. همان روز، وقتی به خانه آمدم، پس از سال ها کتاب مهجور رباعیات خیام را برداشتم و ورق زدم و این بار، نگارگری ها نبودند که من را به خیام علاقه مند می کردند، خود رباعیات بودند. از آن پس، آن کتاب که گذار سالیان شیرازه اش را نابود کرده بود، شد دوست و همراه من. حتی در بستر خواب هم همراهش داشتم. یادم نمی رود. عصر یک روز، مادرم اصرار می کرد که کتاب را کنار بگذارم و بخوابم. من کتاب را بستم، اما همین که چشم مادر را دور دیدم، باز گشودمش و خواندمش و خواندمش و خواندمش. تا جایی که دیگر چشم هایم توان بیدار ماندن نداشتند. رؤیای بی تصویر آن روزم، سرشار بود از رباعیات خیام. نمی دانم آن ها را می خواندم یا می شنیدم یا از ذهنم می گذراندم. از آن روز، خیام شد شاعر من! قبل از آن، اگر سعدی و حافظ را شاعران بزرگی میدانستم یا اشعار مولوی را ضعیف می دانستم، فقط به خاطر این بود که پدرم و برادر بزرگترم این چنین می گفتند. اما خیام، اولین کسی بود که من به رغم فضای خانواده می پرستیدمش.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Mohammed-Makram

    الإعجاز فى المجاز من يقرأ هذا الكتاب فى اطار المعقول سيكفّر الشاعر او على الأقل سيتهمه بالزندقه لكن ما هكذا نقرأ الشعر و لا هكذا نتذوق الفن 01 سمعتُ صوتاً هاتفاً في السّحَر نادى مِن الحانِ : غُفاة البشَر هبُّوا املأوا كأس الطلى قبَل أن تَفعم كأس العمرْ كفّ القدَر 02 أحسُّ في نفسي دبيب الفناء ولم أصَب في العيشِ إلاّ الشقاء يا حسرتا إن حانَ حيني ولم يُتحْ لفكري حلّ لُغز القضاء 03 أفق وهات الكأس أنعمُ بها واكشف خفايا النفس مِن حُجبها وروّ أوصالي بها قَبلَما يُصاغ دنّ الخمَر مِن تُربها 04 تروحُ أيامي ولا ت الإعجاز فى المجاز من يقرأ هذا الكتاب فى اطار المعقول سيكفّر الشاعر او على الأقل سيتهمه بالزندقه لكن ما هكذا نقرأ الشعر و لا هكذا نتذوق الفن 01 سمعتُ صوتاً هاتفاً في السّحَر نادى مِن الحانِ : غُفاة البشَر هبُّوا املأوا كأس الطلى قبَل أن تَفعم كأس العمرْ كفّ القدَر 02 أحسُّ في نفسي دبيب الفناء ولم أصَب في العيشِ إلاّ الشقاء يا حسرتا إن حانَ حيني ولم يُتحْ لفكري حلّ لُغز القضاء 03 أفق وهات الكأس أنعمُ بها واكشف خفايا النفس مِن حُجبها وروّ أوصالي بها قَبلَما يُصاغ دنّ الخمَر مِن تُربها 04 تروحُ أيامي ولا تغتدي كما تهبُّ الريح في الفدفدِ وما طويتَ النفس هماً عَلى يومين : أمسْ المنقضى والغدِ 05 سمعتُ في حلمي صوتاً أهابَ ما فتَّق النّوم كمام الشبابَ أفق فإنَّ النّوم صنو الردى واشرب فمثواكَ فراش الترابَ 06 لو أنّني خُيَّرت أو كانَ لي مفتاحُ باب القدر المقفلِ لاخترتَ عن دنيا الأسى أنّني لم أهبطَ الدُنيا ولم أرحلِ 07 لَبستُ ثوبَ العيش لم أُستشَر وحرتُ فيه بين شتّى الفِكَر وسوفَ أنضو الثوب عنّي ولم أُدرك لماذا جئتُ ، أينَ المقر 08 نمضي وتبقى العيشةُ الراضية وتنمحي آثارُنا الماضية فقَبل أن نَحيا ومِن بعدِنا وهذه الدُنيا علَى ما هيه 09 يا نفسَ ماهذا الأسى والكدر قَد وقعَ الإثم وضاع الحذر هَل ذاقَ حلو العفوَ إلاّ الَّذي أذنبَ والله عفَا واغتفر 10 نلبسُ بينَ الناس ثوب الرياء ونحنُ في قبضةِ كفّ القضاء وكم سعينا نرتجي مهرباً فكانَ مسعَانَا جميعاً هباء 11 يامَن يَحارُ الفَهمُ في قدرتك وتطلبُ النَفسُ حمى طاعتك أسكرَني الإثمُ ولكنّني صحوَت بالآمال في رحمتك 12 قلبي في صدري أسيرٌ سجين تُخجلهُ عشرةُ ماءٍ وطين وكم جرى عزمي بتحطيمه فكانَ يَنهاني نداءُ اليقين 13 لا تَشغل البَال بماضي الزمان ولا بَآتي العيش قبلَ الأوان واغنم مِن الحاضرِ لذّاتهِ فليسَ في طبعِ اللَّيالي الأمان 14 القلبُ قَد أضناهُ عِشق الجمال والصدرُ قَد ضاقَ بما لا يُقال يا ربْ هل يُرضيك هذا الظما والماءُ ينساب أمامي زُلال 15 وإنَّما نحنُ رخاخ القضاء ينقلنا في اللوحِ أنّى يشاء وكلُّ مَن يفرغ مِن دورهِ يُلقَى به في مستقّرِ الفناء 16 رأيتُ صفّاً مِن دنانٍ سرى ما بينها همسُ حديثٍ جرى كأنّها تسألُ : أينَ الَّذي قَد صاغَنا أوباعَنا أو شرى 17 هل في مجالِ السكون شىءٌ بديع أحلى مِن الكأسِ وزهرُ الربيع عجبتُ للخمّار هل يشترى بمالهِ أحسنَ مما يبيع ! 18 عش راضياً واهجر دواعي الألم واعدل مع الظَالم مهما ظلَم نهايةُ الدُنيا فناءٌ فَعش فيها طليقاً واعتبرها عدم 19 لا تأمل الخلَّ المقيم الوفاء فإنَّما أنتَ بدنيا الرياء تحمَّل الداء ولا تلتمس لهُ دواءً وانفرد بالشقاء 20 لا توحشَ النفس بخوف الظّنون واغنم مِن الحاضرِ أمَنْ اليقين فقد تساوى في الثرى راحلٌ غداً وماضٍ مِن ألوف السنين

  9. 3 out of 5

    Agir(آگِر)

    پر كن قدح باده، كه معلومم نيست كاين دم كه فرو برم برآرم يا نه خیام کیست؟ برخی از شاعران ایرانی آنچنان که بوده اند؛ در بین مردم سرزمین ما شناخته نشده اند. بنظر می رسد که دو دلیل اصلی داشته باشد: یکی اینکه عده ای مغرض بطوری عامدانه تلاش کرده اند چهره ای مطابق اعتقادات خودشان از این شعرا بسازند و نمی خواستند مردم شخصیت واقعی شاعران معروف را بشناسند و دلیل دیگر در لفافه گویی این شاعران و استفاده از صنایع ادبی و گاها سخت فهم در شعر بوده که تنها جنبهی زیبایی نداشته بلکه از ترس اینکه توسط متعصبان مورد آزار پر كن قدح باده، كه معلومم نيست كاين دم كه فرو برم برآرم يا نه خیام کیست؟ برخی از شاعران ایرانی آنچنان که بوده اند؛ در بین مردم سرزمین ما شناخته نشده اند. بنظر می رسد که دو دلیل اصلی داشته باشد: یکی اینکه عده ای مغرض بطوری عامدانه تلاش کرده اند چهره ای مطابق اعتقادات خودشان از این شعرا بسازند و نمی خواستند مردم شخصیت واقعی شاعران معروف را بشناسند و دلیل دیگر در لفافه گویی این شاعران و استفاده از صنایع ادبی و گاها سخت‌ فهم در شعر بوده که تنها جنبه‌ی زیبایی نداشته بلکه از ترس اینکه توسط متعصبان مورد آزار و اذیت قرار گیرند از چنین تکنیک هایی کمال استفاده را برده اند خود خیام هم متوجه این برداشتهای اشتباه بوده و حتی در مورد باورهایش مستقیما شعر سروده گر من ز مي مغانه مستم، هستم گر كافر و گبر و بت پرستم، هستم هر طايفه اي بمن گماني دارد من زان خودم، چنانكه هستم هستم مي خوردن و شاد بودن آئين منست فارغ بودن ز كفر و دين؛ دين منست؛ گفتم بعروس دهر: كابين تو چيست؟ گفتا: دل خرم تو كابين منست رندی ديدم نشسته بر خنگ زمين، نه كفر و نه اسلام و نه دنيا و نه دين نی حق، نه حقيقت، نه شريعت نه يقين اندردو جهان كرا بود زهره ی اين؟ خیام با اینکه نسبت به دیگر شاعران بی پرواتر بوده ولی منسوب کردن یک عالمه شعر به خیام در طول تاریخ -چه عامدانه و چه غیرعامدانه- باعث گردیده تصویرمبهم تری از شخصیت و افکارش داشته باشیم با این حال، مقدمه یکی از نابغه های ادبیات ایران یعنی صادق هدایت کمک زیادی به آدم می کنه تا پاسخ پرسش بالا را تا حدودی بیابیم. به گفته ی هدایت: اگر يكي از اين نسخه هاي رباعيات را از روی تفريح ورق بزنيم و بخوانيم در آن به افكار متضاد، به مضمون هاي گوناگون و به موضوع هاي قديم و جديد بر مي خوريم؛ بطوريكه اگر يكنفر صد سال عمر كرده باشد و روزي دو مرتبه كيش و مسلك و عقيده خود را عوض کرده باشد قادر به گفتن چنين افكاری نخواهد بود صادق هدایت در انتخاب شعرها وسواس زیادی بکار برده تا شعرهای سطحی نسبت داده شده به خیام وارد این کتاب نشوند هر آخوندي كه شراب خورده و يك رباعي درين زمينه گفته از ترس تكفير آنرا به خيام نسبت داده . لهذا رباعياتي كه اغلب دم از شرابخواري و معشوقه بازي می زند بدون يك جنبه‌ی فلسفي و يا نكته زننده و يا ناشي از افكار نپخته و افيوني است و سخناني كه داراي معاني مجازي است و درشت است مي شود با كمال اطمينان دور بريزيم به نظر هدایت، خیام دهری است. دهری یعنی اعتقاد به اینکه خدایی جز طبیعت وجود ندارد و خبری از مبدا و معاد نیست و طبیعت همیشه وجود داشته است. استیفن هاوکینگ هم به بوجود خدا باوری ندارد و جهان را خلق شده در یک لحظه خاص نمی داند. جالب اینکه نظریات خیام به مادی گراهای امروز بسیار نزدیک است و باید بگویم خیام چون ستاره شناس و دانشمند بوده نظریاتش براساس دلایل عقلی و تجربه گرایی هستند :برخی از شعرهای خیام خیام که بخاطر عقایدش مورد استهزای آخوند و شیخ ها بوده، پاسخ سختی به آنها می دهد اینکه عقاید کداممان انسانی ترند ای صاحب فتوی، ز تو پركارتريم با اينهمه مستی، از تو هشيارتريم؛ تو خون كسان خوری و ما خون رزان انصاف بده؛ كدام خونخوارتريم؟ شيخي بزني فاحشه گفتا: مستی هر لحظه بدام دگری پا بستی؛ گفتا: شيخا، هر آنچه گوئی هستم آيا تو چنانكه می نمائی هستی؟ خیام است و شاید از خود پرسیده حالا که باید گفت چرا اینقدر اندک؟ این است که با چهار مصرع های آهنگینش، به سراغ اعتقادات هزارساله شان می رود و با دو دوتا چهارتایی آنها را زیر سوال می برد طبق آنچه در ادیان آمده خداوند کامل است و بدین خاطر نباید چیزی ناقص بیافریند حالا مسئله این است چرا انسانی ساخته که زود بیمار می شود و فانی می شود و چرا بعد از اینکه جهان را ساخته دوباره نابودش می کند تا جهان کاملتری جایگزینش شود آیا تناقضی در این بین وجود ندارد؟ دارنده چه تركيب طبايع آراست باز از چه سبب فكندش اندر كم و كاست؟ گر زشت آمد اين صور، عيب كراست؟ ور نيك آمد، خرابی از بهر چه خواست؟ :بهشت و جهنم خیام در برخی شعرهایش بهشت و جهنم را زیر سوال می برد که در ریویوهای دیگری آنرا آورده ام. با اینحال اگر دوزخی هم وجود داشته باشد آنرا جایی بسیار بهتر از بهشتی می داند که جای زهدفروشان و شیخهای متظاهر باشد گويند كه دوزخی بود عاشق و مست قولی است خلاف، دل در آن نتوان بست گر عاشق و مست دوزخی خواهد بود فردا باشد بهشت همچون كف دست اگر برای حورالعین و شراب عبادت می کنی همین ها در این جهان هم هست. چه معلوم که جهانی دیگر وجود داشته باشد یا نه گويند: بهشت و حور عين خواهد بود و آنجا می ناب و انگبين خواهد بود؛ گر ما می و معشوقه گزيديم چه باك؟ آخر نه بعاقبت همين خواهد بود؟ گويند: بهشت و حور و كوثر باشد جوی می و شير و شهد و شكر باشد؛ پر كن قدح باده و بر دستم نه .نقدی ز هزار نسيه بهتر باشد گويند بهشت عدن با حور خوش است من مي گويم كه: آب انگور خوش است؛ اين نقد بگير و دست از آن نسيه بدار كاواز دهل برادر از دور خوش است خیام در چند شعر این حرف را تکرار کرده و دارد می گوید باید از این جهان بهشتی ساخت تا همه ی انسان ها در آن لذت ببرند و نباید به آنچه نامعلوم است دل بست. این حرفی است که فلسفه امروزی هم به آن باور دارد ای دل تو به ادراك معما نرسی در نكته زيركان دانا نرسی؛ اينجا ز می و جام بهشتي می ساز كانجا كه بهشت است رسي يا نرسی :خیام و می خیام مرگ را آخر همه چیز می داند باز آمدنت نيست، چو رفتي رفتی آمد شدن تو اندرين عالم چيست؟ آمد مگسی پديد و ناپيدا شد دنيا ديدی و هر چه ديدی هيچ است و آن نيز كه گفتی و شنيدی هيچ است خیام به این نتیجه می رسد که کسی از دلیل اصلی زندگی ما خبر ندارد ،در دايره ای كآمدن و رفتن ماست آن را نه بدايت، نه نهايت پيداست؛ ،كس می نزند دمی در اين عالم راست !كين آمدن از كجا و رفتن بكجاست و او برای مرگ پاسخی نمی یابد جز نیستی هر لاله كه پژمرد، نخواهد بشكفت و این هراس از مرگ، رهایش نمی کند پوچی زندگی را بمانند نویسندگانی چون آلبر کامو و سارتر که قرن ها بعد آمدند درک می کند اما برای فرار از آن دست به دامن می و فراموشی می شود خوش باش كه در نشيمن كون و فساد وابسته يك دميم و آنهم هيچ است من بی می ناب زيستن نتوانم بي باده، كشيد بار تن نتوانم :من بنده آن دمم كه ساقي گويد يك جام دگر بگیر» و من نتوانم»

  10. 3 out of 5

    Soheil

    گر مى نخورى طعنه مزن مستان را بنياد مكن تو حيله و دستان را تو غره بدان مشو كه مِى مينخورى صد لقمه خورى كه مى غلام است آن را راستش سخن در باب خيام و رباعياتش فراوان است و منم علاقه اى به بازگويى بيهوده ى آنها ندارم و صرفا به بيان تجربيات و احساسات شخصى خودم بسنده مى كنم. ماييم و مى و مطرب و اين كنج خراب جان و دل و جام و جامه پردرد شراب فارغ ز اميد رحمت و بيم عذاب آزاد ز خاك و باد و از آتش و آب مورد اول اينكه واقعا بعد از اتمام كتاب،عصبى بودم؛ازينكه چرا اين شاعر اون طور كه لايقشه به ما معرفى نميشه.به شخصه ‏گر مى نخورى طعنه مزن مستان را بنياد مكن تو حيله و دستان را تو غره بدان مشو كه مِى مينخورى صد لقمه خورى كه مى غلام است آن را راستش سخن در باب خيام و رباعياتش فراوان است و منم علاقه اى به بازگويى بيهوده ى آنها ندارم و صرفا به بيان تجربيات و احساسات شخصى خودم بسنده مى كنم. ‏ماييم و مى و مطرب و اين كنج خراب جان و دل و جام و جامه پردرد شراب فارغ ز اميد رحمت و بيم عذاب آزاد ز خاك و باد و از آتش و آب مورد اول اينكه واقعا بعد از اتمام كتاب،عصبى بودم؛ازينكه چرا اين شاعر اون طور كه لايقشه به ما معرفى نميشه.به شخصه يادم نمياد كه تو كتاباى درسيمون درست حسابى به اين شاعر پرداخته باشن؛تهش دو سه تا رباعى بود به همراه يه معلم ادبيات بى سواد(يا باسواد و محافظه كار! كه البته منظورم همه معلما نيست) كه تا يه مِى و شراب و جام تو شعر ميديد،سرى به عشق الهى و خدا و عرفان ربطش ميداد تا چيزى از فلسفش درز نكنه.تا اين حد مسخره كه من بايد تو كتاب "افسانه سيزيف" بفهمم كه اين شاعر گرام و كهنِ ايران،بخش مهمى از جريان فلسفى كسانى مثل نيچه و متأخرينش رو -قرن ها قبل- در قالب شعر بيان كرده! ‏تا چند زنم به روى درياها خشت بيزار شدم ز بت پرستان كنشت خيام كه گفت دوزخى خواهد بود كه رفت به دوزخ و كه آمد ز بهشت دوم اينكه اين اولين تجربه شعر خوانى من بود كه به خواست خودم -و نه به زور چوب معلم و نمره و امتحان- سراغش رفتم و اصلا كى بهتر از خيام؟!براى دوستانى كه مى خوان شعر خوندن رو شروع كنن،رباعيات خيام به خاطر سادگى بيان و اختصار شعر،گزينه ى خيلى خوبيه. ‏در پرده اسرار كسى را ره نيست زين تعبيه جان هيچكس آگه نيست جز در دل خاك هيچ منزلگه نيست مى خور كه چنين فسانه ها كوته نيست و اما چند ايراد... تقريبا فهميدم كه تفكر فلسفى غالب بر خيام لا ادرى گرى ست،اما شدت آن كاملا متغير است؛در جايى خوشحال است و از باده و يار و عيش دَم مى زند امادر جايى ديگر بدبين است و پوچى را مى بيند و مدام هشدار مى دهد.يكبار نقاش ازل(خدا) را مى ستايد و از كارش در حيرت است،اما بارى ديگر،از حكمت خدا بر آشفته مى شود.به طور كلى،گويى عقايد خود را نه به طور متضاد و متناقض،اما با فراز و نشيب هاى فراوان در مقابل خواننده قرار مى دهد و من علتش را نفهميدم. ‏گويند كسان بهشت با حور خوش است من ميگويم كه آب انگور خوش است اين نقد بگير و دست از آن نسيه بدار كِآواز دهل شنيدن از دور خوش است مورد بعدى اينست كه بعد از مدتى،برخى اشعار،حالتى تكرارى به خود مى گيرند.در واقع از جايى به بعد،وجود نشانه هايى مثل مى و جام و خاك و كوزه(گر) و سبزه و ... در اشعار،قابل پيش بينى مى شود؛اگرچه آزار دهنده نيست و سادگى و زيبايى اشعار به قدرى هست كه آن را بپوشاند. ‏هرگز دل من ز علم محروم نشد كم ماند ز اسرار كه معلوم نشد هفتاد و دو سال فكر كردم شب و روز معلومم شد كه هيچ معلوم نشد يك موردى هم كه خيلى كم و با كمال شگفتى بهش برمىخوردم،اين بود كه گاهى،قافيه ى مصرع آخر،با مصرع اول و دوم همخوانى نداشت و نمى فهميدم كه مشكلش به خاطر چيه! ‏ماييم كه اصل شادى و كان غميم سرمايه ى داديم و نهاد ستميم پستيم و بلنديم و نهاديم و كميم آيينه ى زنگ خورده و جام جميم حرف آخر اينكه به نظرم بيشتر از اينها بايد اين شخصيت ها رو بشناسيم و جدى بگيريمشون.چون خيلى وقتا آب در كوزست و ما تشنه لبان،گرد جهان مى گرديم! ‏من ظاهر نيستى و هستى دانم من باطن هر فراز و پستى دانم با اين همه از دانش خود شرمم باد گر مرتبه اى وراى مستى دانم ‏از دى كه گذشت هيچ ازو ياد مكن فردا كه نيامده ست فرياد مكن بر نامده و گذشته بنياد مكن حالى خوش باش و عمر بر باد مكن ‏چون حاصل آدمى در اين شورستان جز خوردن غصه نيست تا كندن جان خرم دل آنكه زين جهان زود برفت وآسوده كسى كه خود نيامد به جهان ‏آن قصر كه با چرخ هميزد پهلو بر درگه آن شهان نهادندى رو ديديم كه بر كنگره اش فاخته اى بنشسته همى گفت كه "كو كو كو كو" ‏نيكى و بدى كه در نهاد بشر است شادى و غمى كه در قضا و قدر است با چرخ مكن حواله كاندر ره عقل چرخ از تو هزار بار بيچاره تر است ‏اى صاحب فتوا ز تو پركار تريم با اين همه مستى از تو هشيار تريم تو خون كسان خورى و ما خون رزان انصاف بده؛كدام خونخوار تريم ‏شيخى به زنى فاحشه گفتا مستى هر لحظه به دام دگرى پا بستى گفتا شيخا هر آنچه گويى هستم آيا تو چنان كه مى نمايى هستى

  11. 3 out of 5

    ميقات الراجحي

    ماتزال ترجمة رامي أحسن تراجم هذه الرباعيات، وهي كذلك لا تلغي ترجمة أحمد فارس الشدياق، والنجفي والزهاوي ومحمد السباعي، وإن كانت ترجمة السباعي ذات كلمات موحشة مهجورة إلا أن بها رباعيات صورها قوية وغاية في القوة إلا أنها كغيرها اعتمدت على الترجمة الإنجليزية التي قام بها الأديب الإنجليزي Edward FitzGerald - في القرن التاسع عشر ثم جل من جاء من بعده قام بنـشر الترجمة العربية نقلًا عن ترجمة هذا الأخيرمن الفارسية للإنجليزية بإستثناء قلة من ترجمها مباشرة من لغتها الأم مثل أحمد رامي وجميل الزهاوي التي نشره ماتزال ترجمة رامي أحسن تراجم هذه الرباعيات، وهي كذلك لا تلغي ترجمة أحمد فارس الشدياق، والنجفي والزهاوي ومحمد السباعي، وإن كانت ترجمة السباعي ذات كلمات موحشة مهجورة إلا أن بها رباعيات صورها قوية وغاية في القوة إلا أنها كغيرها اعتمدت على الترجمة الإنجليزية التي قام بها الأديب الإنجليزي Edward FitzGerald - في القرن التاسع عشر ثم جل من جاء من بعده قام بنـشر الترجمة العربية نقلًا عن ترجمة هذا الأخيرمن الفارسية للإنجليزية بإستثناء قلة من ترجمها مباشرة من لغتها الأم مثل أحمد رامي وجميل الزهاوي التي نشرها نثرًا وشعرًا لتفهم شاعرية هذا الشاعر عمر الخيام يقال : عليك أن تفهم وتعي بعض الـشيء عن الصوفية وماذلك إلا من محاولات بعض الصوفية تقديس الخيام رباعيات الخيام تحتاج فقط - من وجهة نظري الإيمان بروح هذا الشاعر أنها ماتزال حولنا فقط

  12. 3 out of 5

    peiman-mir5 rezakhani

    درود بر صادق هدایت و یادش گرامی... که در این راه، زحمات زیادی کشیده و در جمع آوری اشعار زنده یاد «خیام»، پژوهش فراوان نموده است دوستانِ گرانقدر، در این که زنده یاد «خیام»، فیلسوف و ریاضی دان و ستاره شناس و عالم و گرانقدر بوده، تردید و شکی نیست و در اینکه با موهومات و خرافات مبارزه میکرده است و به داستان های آخرت و چرت و پرت های بهشت و جهنم اصلاً اعتقاد نداشته و دانشمندی مادی نیز بوده است، ذره ای شک و تردید وجود ندارد حال چرا در این زمان و یا سالها پس از مرگ این بزرگمرد اصرار دارند که ثابت کنند ایش درود بر صادق هدایت و یادش گرامی... که در این راه، زحمات زیادی کشیده و در جمع آوری اشعار زنده یاد «خیام»، پژوهش فراوان نموده است دوستانِ گرانقدر، در این که زنده یاد «خیام»، فیلسوف و ریاضی دان و ستاره شناس و عالم و گرانقدر بوده، تردید و شکی نیست و در اینکه با موهومات و خرافات مبارزه میکرده است و به داستان های آخرت و چرت و پرت های بهشت و جهنم اصلاً اعتقاد نداشته و دانشمندی مادی نیز بوده است، ذره ای شک و تردید وجود ندارد حال چرا در این زمان و یا سالها پس از مرگ این بزرگمرد اصرار دارند که ثابت کنند ایشان شاعر بوده، برای من هم جای سؤال است دوستان خردمند و گرامی، من اگر نظری میدهم، این نظر دلیل ندارد که حتماً درست باشد و البته در این که شما بی چون و چرا این نظرات را بپذیرید هیچ اصراری نیست.. ولی خواهشاً در این نظرات اندیشه کنید و با خرد خودتان تصمیم گیری نمایید عزیزانم، توجه کنید که، «خیام» در زندگی کاری و زندگی شخصی، تنها و تنها از فیلسوف و شاعر گرامی «ابوالعلاء معری» پیروی میکرد لذا به تمامی موفقیت های این مرد بزرگ و همچنین اندیشه های فلسفی وی دست پیدا کرده بود، جزء سرودن شعر پس برای رفع این موضوع، جناب خیام بزرگوار، شاعرانی را استخدام نمود که اشعار «ابوالعلاء معری» را از زبانِ زمختِ عربی و تازی، به زبانِ شیرین فارسی بسرایند و یا حداقل در مورد همان موضوع رباعیات دلنشین و زیبایی را به زبان فارسی بسرایند... و در احتمال دیگر ممکن است «خیام» با کمکِ شاعران دیگر، اشعار فلسفی زنده یاد «ابوالعلاء معری» را خود به فارسی سروده باشد به عنوان مثال ابیاتی از این دو اندیشمند بزرگ را در زیر مینویسم... توجه کنید و سپس قضاوت را به خرد خود بسپارید ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ این شعر از «ابوالعلاء معری» گرانقدر است خفف الوط ء ما أظن ادیم ال * ارض الا من هذه الاجساد بر زمین آهسته قدم بگذار که بنظر من جز انسانهای خاک شده چیزی روی زمین نیست ************************* و این شعر منسوب به «خیام» گرانقدر هر سبزه که بر کنار جوئی رسته است* گوئی ز لب فرشته خوئی رسته است پا بر سر هر سبزه بخواری ننهی* کان سبزه ز خاک لاله رویی رسته است ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ این شعر از «ابوالعلاء معری» گرانقدر است فلا یمس فخاراً من الفخر عائداً * الی عنصر الفخار للنفع یضرب چه بسا مردمان متکبری که خاک شده اند و کوزه گران گل آنها را برای ساختن ظرف زیر لگد میکوبند لعل إناء منه یصنع مرة* فیاکل فیه من أراد و یشرب شاید ظرفی که از خاک آنها درست می شود برای خوردن و آشامیدن مورد استفاده دیگران واقع شود و یحمل من ارض لاخری و مادری* فواهاً له بعد البلی یتغرب این ظرفها از شهری به شهر دیگر حمل میشود. وای بر آنها که پس از خاک شدن به غربت هم دچار میشوند **************************** و حال دقت کنید این اشعار زیبا هم با این موضوع منسوب به «خیام» گرانقدر است جامی است که عقل آفرین میزندش* صد بوسه ز مهر بر جبین میزندش این کوزه گر دهر چنین جام لطیف * میسازد و باز بر زمین میزندش برگیر پیاله و سبوئی دلجوی* فارغ بنشین به کشتزار و لب جوی بس شخص عزیز را که چرخ بدخوی * صد بار پیاله کرد و صدبار سبوی بر کوزه گری پریر کردم گذری * از خاک همی نمود هر دم هنری من دیدم اگر ندیده هر بی بصری * خاک پدرم در کف هر کوزه گری ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ عزیزانم، نمونه های زیادی را در بین رباعیات خیام و «ابوالعلاء معری» میتوانید با هم مقایسه کنید.. اما مهّم این است که بدانیم این دو بزرگوار برای من و شما راهنما بوده اند و باید تلاش کنیم تا از نوع اندیشه و فلسفۀ زندگی آنها حمایت کنیم و ایشان را سرلوحۀ زندگی خویش قرار دهیم در آخر به جمله زیبایی از «ابوالعلاء معری» اشاره میکنم که «خیام بزرگ» نیز در همان جهت رباعی زیبایی را انتخاب نموده است ابوالعلاء معری عزیز میفرمایند فقد کذبوا، ما یعرفون انقضاء* فلا تسمعوا من کاذب الزعماء دروغ میگویند آنها از پایان روزگار خبر ندارند از این دروغگویان خیالباف حرف گوش نکنید آیا مرده ای از خاک برخاست که از دیده ها و شنیده هایش، خبر دهد؟؟ ***************************** و حال این شعر پربار در همین راستا منسوب به «خیام» خردمند است تا چند زنم بروی دریاها خشت * بیزار شدم ز بت پرستان و کنشت خیام که گفت دوزخی خواهد بود؟ * که رفت به دوزخ و که آمد به بهشت؟ و کس خلد و جحیم را ندیده است اِی دل* گوئی که از آن جهان رسیدست اِی دل امید و هراس ما به چیزیست کز آن * جز نام نشانی نه پدید است اِی دل ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ امیدوارم این مقایسه و این ریویو برایِ شما بزرگوارانِ ادب دوست و خردگرا، مفید بوده باشه «پیروز باشید و ایرانی»

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. تاریخ خوانش این نسخه: ماه فوریه سال 2004 میلادی عنولن: رباعیات خیام؛ شاعر: خیام؛ به کوشش: خسرو زعیمی با همکاری انتشارات میراث؛ خط: کیخسرو خروش؛ تذهیب: محمدباقر آقامیری؛ ترجمه به انگلیسی: ادوارد فیتزجرالد؛ ترجمه به فرانسه: کلود آنت؛ موضوع: رباعیات خیام خط کیخسرو خر The Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar Khayyám, Edward FitzGerald (Translator) Written 1120 A.C.E. Omar Khayyam was born at Naishapur in Khorassan in the latter half of Eleventh Century, and died within the First Quarter of Twelfth Century. تاریخ خوانش این نسخه: ماه فوریه سال 2004 میلادی عنولن: رباعیات خیام؛ شاعر: خیام؛ به کوشش: خسرو زعیمی با همکاری انتشارات میراث؛ خط: کیخسرو خروش؛ تذهیب: محمدباقر آقامیری؛ ترجمه به انگلیسی: ادوارد فیتزجرالد؛ ترجمه به فرانسه: کلود آنت؛ موضوع: رباعیات خیام خط کیخسرو خروش به کوشش خسرو زعیمی سال 1362؛ در 275 ص؛ در دفترم دوازده نسخه از این کتاب مستطاب هنوز هم هست؛ برای همین است مشخصات نسخه های چاپ شده ی دیگر را در این ریویو نمیبینید، بسیار زیاد هستند و نوشتن تکه ای از پاره های نشر هم دردی را از پژوهشگران درمان نخواهد کرد، و نمیکند؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش این فراموشکار از خیام دلآویز نیز به دوره ی دبیرستان فیوضات تبریز برمیگردد، سالهای 1342 هجری شمسی به بعد، چند سال پیشتر خواستم نسخه ی روانشاد: ادوارد فیتزجرالد را با نسخه های کهن موجود در اینترنت برابر نهم و برای خود پژوهشکی کنم شاید که گرهی گشوده شود؛ بیشتر نسخه ها را گرد آوردم و صفحاتی چند از نسخه ی چاپ شده ی فیتز جرالد را نیز یافتم، سپس به نسخه های هدایت و دیگران پرداختم، هنوز هم گاه دستی بالا میزنم و چند خطی مینویسم برخیز و بیا بتا برای دل ما، حل کن به جمال خویشتن مشکل ما یک کوزه شراب تا بهم نوش کنیم، زان پیش که کوزه ها کنند از گـِل ما خیام ا. شربیانی

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Hartl

    In 1942, when my father was in the South Pacific, he asked for only one thing for Christmas...this book of poetry. My mother sent it to him with an inscription in the frontispiece which spoke wistfully of days to come. Later, he sent her a photo of him, reading this book, leaning back on a palm tree, with a bottle of wine and a loaf of bread on the cloth beside him...on the back of the photo, he wrote, "...all I'm missing is thou..." Obviously, this book is a family treasure, and I cannot read it In 1942, when my father was in the South Pacific, he asked for only one thing for Christmas...this book of poetry. My mother sent it to him with an inscription in the frontispiece which spoke wistfully of days to come. Later, he sent her a photo of him, reading this book, leaning back on a palm tree, with a bottle of wine and a loaf of bread on the cloth beside him...on the back of the photo, he wrote, "...all I'm missing is thou..." Obviously, this book is a family treasure, and I cannot read it without remembering my parent's great love affair. "Come, fill the Cup, and in the Fire of Spring The Winter Garment of Repentance fling: The Bird of Time has but a little way To fly--and Lo! the Bird is on the Wing." "Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough, A Flask of Wine, A Book of Verse--and Thou Beside me singing in the Wilderness-- And Wilderness is Paradise enow."

  15. 4 out of 5

    ZaRi

    من ظاهر نیستی و هستی دانم من باطن هر فراز و پستی دانم با این هـمه از دانش خود شرمم باد گـر مرتبه ای ورای مستی دانم *** یاران چو به اتفاق دیدار کنید باید که ز دوست یاد بسیار کنید چون باده خوشگوار نوشید به هم نوبت چو به ما رسد نگونسار کنید

  16. 3 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    It is a flash from the stage of non-belief to faith, There is no more than a syllable between doubt and certainty: Prize this precious moment dearly, It is our life's only fruit. I had a palm size edition of Edward Fitzgerald's translation. He changed his translation over the years and there are big differences between some of the different published editions. Reading this, the Avery translation, was a shock because none of the verses were recognisable. At first I found myself like Pnin hankering It is a flash from the stage of non-belief to faith, There is no more than a syllable between doubt and certainty: Prize this precious moment dearly, It is our life's only fruit. I had a palm size edition of Edward Fitzgerald's translation. He changed his translation over the years and there are big differences between some of the different published editions. Reading this, the Avery translation, was a shock because none of the verses were recognisable. At first I found myself like Pnin hankering after a wayward translation because it had its own strange music. Nobody has known anything better than sparkling wine Since the morning star and the moon graced the sky: Wine-sellers astonish me because What can they buy better than what they sell? I'm not sure if Fitzgerald knew Persian, but in any case Avery's intention was to write a literal translation. Avery in the introduction is generous towards Fitzgerald's translation, which is well known and much loved. When it comes to translating poetry what the ill-tempered might call inaccuracy can be creativity, a reinvention of the original in an alien language which has its own foreign rhythm. The year's caravan goes by swiftly, Seize the cheerful moment: Why sorrow, boy, over tomorrow's grief for friends? Bring out the cup - the night passes. Rereading what struck me was how repetitive many of the verses were. Some seem like variations of each other and the effect of reading them a little similar to reading Pascal's Pensées. The themes are the impermanence of life, the unknowability of the future and afterlife, the enjoyment of the present moment and Dust Thou Art, and Unto Dust Shalt Thou Return. A pie chart illustrating Khayyam's poetic impulses would not need many slices. How long shall I grieve for what I have or have not, Over whether to pass my life in pleasure? Fill the wine-bowl - it is not certain That I shall breathe out again the breath I now draw. Khayyam was a mathematician, astrologer and philosopher. The attribution of verses to his name was made only after his death. Some were also attributed to other writers and it seems that only one four line verse can be reliably thought to have actually been composed by Khayyam (and this because Ata-Malik Juvaini tells us that some of the survivors of the sack of Baghdad recited it in his history of the Mongol conquests). I suppose our ignorance over the authorship only proves the poet's point about the impermanence of life. These few odd days of life have passed Like water down the brook, wind across the desert; There are two days I have never been plagued with regret for, Yesterday that has gone, tomorrow that will come.

  17. 3 out of 5

    Rosa Jamali

    It wasn't easy to praise wine and create seize the day thought in twelfth century Iran. After a long time that Baghdad has ruled in Iranians land and bullied a nation by the name of religion.A big civilization's being extincted if they no longer use their own alphabet and writing in Arabic has been highly suggested!... Now it's high time that an autonomous Persian government is being established which could revitalise the faded culture of past. In Rubaiyat there's a high sense of nostalgia toward It wasn't easy to praise wine and create seize the day thought in twelfth century Iran. After a long time that Baghdad has ruled in Iranians land and bullied a nation by the name of religion.A big civilization's being extincted if they no longer use their own alphabet and writing in Arabic has been highly suggested!... Now it's high time that an autonomous Persian government is being established which could revitalise the faded culture of past. In Rubaiyat there's a high sense of nostalgia towards old Persian values with all its mythological kings as Jamshid and Keikhosru. Compared to his contemporaries creating a hypocrite literature; he unveils the truth. The sorry state is that in his contemporary poets you'll find worthless eulogies miserably written in praise of authorities whereas Omar khayyam is a daring man who depicts a real mistress, he talks about being and time, a lost identity where he questions death, doomsday and orthodox Muslims. The odd one out! ,...It's clear that the mistress of Rubaiyat is a real woman and not an imaginary character or probably a man as it was very common at that very time. Mysticism for centuries has suggested a range of vocabulary which is repetitive, addictive and cliche whereas the choice of vocabulary in Khayyam is vigorous and real. His question of death is the most common question of human being through the time and death and rebirth archetype is the main theme of Rubaiyat. That's a pity that he lived anonymous as a poet though his work has been recognised and always celebrated after his death.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Roy Lotz

    I feel a bit awkward reviewing a book this short, so I’ll keep my review short as well. There are some very fine verses here, especially good to read before a night of drunken foolery. Although FitzGerald’s translation is known for being somewhat inaccurate, I wouldn’t even consider trading it for a more scrupulous edition. Instead, why not view the poems as an artistic collaboration between two great poets, across time and space? When small-minded tin-eared scholars Take a look at his verse and h I feel a bit awkward reviewing a book this short, so I’ll keep my review short as well. There are some very fine verses here, especially good to read before a night of drunken foolery. Although FitzGerald’s translation is known for being somewhat inaccurate, I wouldn’t even consider trading it for a more scrupulous edition. Instead, why not view the poems as an artistic collaboration between two great poets, across time and space? When small-minded tin-eared scholars Take a look at his verse and holler: "Why! what grave and fatal inaccuracies!" Resist the urge to grab them by the collar When pencil-pushing professors sneer: “FitzGerald’s version does not adhere To the original Persian manuscript here!” Pat them on the back and have another beer

  19. 3 out of 5

    ژی

    خیام را خیلی دوست دارم، اولین آشنایی من با خیام از راه استاد هژار (مترجم رباعیات خیام به کردی) بود، واقعا طوری ترجمه اش کرده که حس میکنی خیام به زبان کردی رباعیاتش را سروده است! بعدا شروع کردم که رباعیات را به فارسی بخوانم و هنوزم میخوانمشون چون واقعا بینظیرن. یه بار در روز خیام را با خواندن یک از رباعیاتش در ویژه برنامه خیام در رادیوپل اشتراک کردم ،این بود: بنگر ز جهان چه طرف بر بستم ؟ هیچ وز حاصل عمر چیست در دستم ؟ هیچ شـمع طـربم ولی چـو بنـشستم هیچ من جام جمم ولی چو بشکستم هیچ خیام را خیلی دوست دارم، اولین آشنایی من با خیام از راه استاد هژار (مترجم رباعیات خیام به کردی) بود، واقعا طوری ترجمه‌ اش کرده که حس میکنی خیام به زبان کردی رباعیاتش را سروده‌ است! بعدا شروع کردم که رباعیات را به فارسی بخوانم و هنوزم میخوانمشون چون واقعا بی‌نظیرن. یه بار در روز خیام را با خواندن یک از رباعیاتش در ویژه برنامه خیام در رادیوپل اشتراک کردم ،این بود: بنگر ز جهان چه طرف بر بستم ؟ هیچ وز حاصل عمر چیست در دستم ؟ هیچ شـمع طـربم ولی چـو بنـشستم هیچ من جام جمم ولی چو بشکستم هیچ

  20. 3 out of 5

    Huda Aweys

    عمر الخيام :) ... واضح جدا من اشعاره انه كان من الدهريين .. المؤمنين بالله و بالاسلام و القرآن (لكن بيأولوا معانيه و احكامه على هواهم) ..، و الغير مؤمنين بالبعث و الحساب و الجنة و النار ، الشيطان عندهم ارقى و افضل من الانسان .. ماديين لأقصى حد .. و الخمر و النساء و الأموال و اللذة القريبة .. هي مقدساتهم اللى بيهيموا بيها .. و ( عصفور في اليد خير من عشرة على الشجرة) .. حكمتهم الأثيرة اللي بتعبر عن تفكير ضحل ومادي .. حيواني .. و سفيه للغاية ! ..، يعني لذة قريبة من خمر او زنا افضل لهم من متعة روحي عمر الخيام :) ... واضح جدا من اشعاره انه كان من الدهريين .. المؤمنين بالله و بالاسلام و القرآن (لكن بيأولوا معانيه و احكامه على هواهم) ..، و الغير مؤمنين بالبعث و الحساب و الجنة و النار ، الشيطان عندهم ارقى و افضل من الانسان .. ماديين لأقصى حد .. و الخمر و النساء و الأموال و اللذة القريبة .. هي مقدساتهم اللى بيهيموا بيها .. و ( عصفور في اليد خير من عشرة على الشجرة) .. حكمتهم الأثيرة اللي بتعبر عن تفكير ضحل ومادي .. حيواني .. و سفيه للغاية ! ..، يعني لذة قريبة من خمر او زنا افضل لهم من متعة روحية في الدنيا مع وعد بها و اضعاف مثلها في الآخرة ايضا و مع ذلك استشعرت تردده تجاه عقيدته تلك من حين لآخر اثناء قرائتي لأشعاره .. و كأنه حاسس ان فلسفته و عقيدته باطلة و ان ضعفه امام الخمر ، و هواه هو ما حذى به الى الميل لها .. فكان من وقت لآخر بيطلب المغفره من ربنا و يستعطفه بغناه عز و جل عن حسابه .. و بيقر بذنبه و بضعفه امام الخمر .. الا انه بعد كل دعاء مثل هذا ، كان بيعود لمثل قوله و اكثر عن البعث و الحساب بأنهم خرافة و لتغزله في الخمر و هيامه بها .. !! و في النهاية لما استسلم لنفسه و لاهوائه قاطبة بقى (يخبط) و يفلسف لنفسه زيادة و يلطش هنا شويه و هنا شويه :) و يجيب من هنا و من هناك ! .. ، يتكلم عن الجبرية و عن ان ربنا خلقه كده و ارادله كده شويه .. ... و يقول ان ربنا خلق المفاتن دي كلها عشان نستمتع بيها و يتساءل اومال هو خلقها ليه ؟؟ شويه ، و موش واصل له ان هو دا اختبارنا و امتحاننا و ان المطلوب مننا نصمد امام الفتن دي و نلجم انفسنا و نعلي ارواحنا و نسلمها الذمام .. ... و شوية يلوم على ربنا عز و جل بعبثية و يصفه بالظالم ... و بعدين يرجع للدهرية تاني ..... المهم يبرر لنفسه و خلاص :) مكابرة منه و عند ، رغم ان الموضوع بسيط ! و كأي سفيه .. بيخطأ و بدل مايحاول يقوم نفسه و يحاسب نفسه .. و يتحكم في نفسه .. بيهرب من دا بأنه يحاول يجر الناس كلها و يتهمهم باللي فيه ! .. و كل شوية يتهم الناس بالرياء ! .. الصائمين مراءين ، و القائمين مراءين ، و الذاكرين مراءين !! قمة السفه و انت كنت دخلت جوا قلوبهم ؟! :) .. طب و لو قاصد تشتم منهم الصائمين و القائمين و الذاكرين .. المراءين فقط .. موش دا معناه ان فيه آخرين غير مراءين مابتشغلش نفسك بيهم ليه طيب .. مابتتكلمش عنهم ليه دول .. و تحاول تفكر هما ليه صادقين و موش مراءين .. و لا خلاص كل الناس يا اما مراءين يا اما بلهاء .. ، و حضرتك (يا اللي موش عارف تتحكم في نفسك و تسيب الخمر اللى مخلي عقلك فى اجازة و بتهرب بيها من التفكير اصلا) اللي حكمت بدا !!!؟ :) !! قمة السفه و العجز حقيقة ... حتى لما تذكر الجنة و قرر يكتب عنها نظر لها نظرة مادية بحتة ، على انها مكان الحور ! و ماقدرش يتصور قيمتها الروحية و قارن مابينها و مابين الدنيا مقارنة ظالمة مجحفة بالتالى ، انتصر فيها للدنيا و لفلسفته المادية و قال : قال قوم أطيب الحور في الجن ة قلت المدام عندي أطيب فاغنم النقد و اترك الدين و اعلم أنصوت الطبول في البعد اعذب و انا ببساطة باؤمن بالروح و بالبعث :) و بعدالة الله .. و بحريتنا اللى وهبها لنا عز و جل في الاختيار ، و بالتالي اللي كاتبه دا بالنسبة لى محض هراء ، و ان كنت اعطيته نجمة اخرى وكنت بافكر ازودها بنجمة تالته كمان .. فدا كان على أبيات قليلة عجبتني في ديوانه .. نقلت بعضها هنا في اقتباسات (و اعجبتنى بناء على تأويلي و نيتي انا و ليس نيته او تأويله لها !) .. فالشعر هو احاسيس و مشاعر اللي بيكتبه .. بيحصل انها بتتوافق مع وجهة نظر اللي بيقرأ او مع مشاعره و احاسيسه زي لو واحد كتب عن الحب او الخيانة و اللي بيقرأ بيعيش حالة حب مع انسان او مع الخالق عز و جل .. او بيعاني من آثار خيانة كلها مشاعر انسانية بنتشاركها كلنا .. عموما .. ربنا بيهب بعضنا موهبة التعبير عنها شعرا او تمثيلا او غناء .. الخ ، و اللى بيكتب عن الحب او الزمن او الوفاء بيكتب عن معناهم المجرد و بالتالى كل واحد بيخصص المعنى المجرد دا و بيأوله بناء على حالته الشخصية و افكاره حتى و ان كانوا لايتفقوا مع ماقصده الشاعر ... (دا تقريبا كان ملخص لمحاضرة حضرتها عن الشعر لدكتور موش فاكرة اسمه في جامعة حلوان مع تعزيز برأيي الشخصي) :) ***** كل ذرات هذه الأرض كانت أوجهها كالشموس ذات بهاء ***** من تحرى حقيقة الدهر أضحى عنده الحزن و السرور سواء هو يقصد بحقيقة الدهر عقيدته الدهرية اللي خلاص بقت حقيقة بالنسبة له :) .. لكنى أولت البيت على هوايا :) و عقيدتي .. فعجبني ***** لا تنظرن إلى الفتى و فنونه و انظر لحفظ عهوده و وفائه فإذا رأيت المرء قام بعهده فاحسبه فاق الكل في عليائه ***** إلهي قل لي من خلى من خطيئة وكيف ترى عاش البرئ من الذنب إذا كنت تجري الذنب مني بمثلهفما الفرق مابيني و بينك ياربي يقصد ينظر على المؤمنين بالحساب و يقولهم ان ربنا مابيحاسبش (زي البشر اللي بيحاسبوا بعضهم و الا فما الفرق بين ربنا عز و جل و بينهم) .. لكنه نسي ان ربنا عادل ومن اسمائه العدل و ان محاسبته هي تطبيق للعدل ..لكنه غنى عن حسابنا طبعا (كان دكتور مصطفى محمود الله يرحمه اتكلم عن الموضوع دا باستفاضة اكتر فى كتبه ) .. و ان كان البيت من الابيات اللي عجبتني فدا لأني أولته على عقيدتي ايضا .. على رحمة ربنا :) ***** لئن جالست من تهواه عمرا و ذقت لذات الوجود فسوف تفارق الدنيا كأن الذي شاهدت حلم في هجود ***** لئن عمرت صاحي ألف حول فسوف تعاف هذي الدار قهرا

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashraf Shipiny

    اللهم إني عرفتك على مبلع إمكاني فاغفر لي ، فإن معرفتي إياك وسيلتي إليك

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shivam Chaturvedi

    If you were ever to compile the different odes to alcohol (there are likely to be very many in different languages and dialects, recited in different stages of inebriation), then this would have to rank right at the very top. The beauty and wonder with which Omar Khayyam has constructed his poem is a joy to behold. The comparisons stun you, for you'd have never seen it that way before. You almost get the feeling that you're sitting in one of those taverns in Arabia, that we so often see in movie If you were ever to compile the different odes to alcohol (there are likely to be very many in different languages and dialects, recited in different stages of inebriation), then this would have to rank right at the very top. The beauty and wonder with which Omar Khayyam has constructed his poem is a joy to behold. The comparisons stun you, for you'd have never seen it that way before. You almost get the feeling that you're sitting in one of those taverns in Arabia, that we so often see in movies and cartoons, and every gust of wind brings in a little sand and a bit of Khayyam's poetry with it. I can only imagine how must it feel to read this poem in its original form, which I hope to do some day, if even the translation is able to sweep you off your feet. For instance, this: The Grape(wine) that can with Logic absolute The Two-and-Seventy jarring Sects confute : The subtle Alchemist that in a Trice Life's leaden Metal into Gold transmute. Wow, just fucking wow. I feel a little guilty of trivializing a poem of this stature which has so many layers of meaning, stacked one on top of the other, into an ode to drinking. But then the sense you get from the many metaphysical meanings of this poem is to be drunk on life, or atleast go about with a sense of wonder and that stupid smile that is so often a characteristic of drunkards. For, Think, in this batter'd Caravanserai Whose Doorways are alternate Night and Day, How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp Abode his Hour or two, and went his way.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ola Al-Najres

    حين نقول رباعيات الخيام ، فإننا عن جمال الشعر الفارسي نتحدث ... عن الحكمة و مناجاة الله ، عن تساؤلات النفس و التفكر بالقدر ، عن أهواء القلب و زهد الدنيا ... و الكثير . جميلة ككل ، تجمع بين سلاسة الكلام و متانة التعبير . يا عالم الأسرار علم اليقين يا كاشف الضر عن البائسين يا قابل الأعذار فئنا إلى ظلّك فاقبل توبة التائبين * أفنيتُ عمري في ارتقابِ المُنى و لم أذق في العيش طعم الهنا و إنَّني أُشفق أن ينقضي عمري و ما فارقت هذا العَنا * عاشر من الناس كبار العقول و جانب الجهال أهل الفضول و اشرب نقيع السمّ من عاقلٍ و ا حين نقول رباعيات الخيام ، فإننا عن جمال الشعر الفارسي نتحدث ... عن الحكمة و مناجاة الله ، عن تساؤلات النفس و التفكر بالقدر ، عن أهواء القلب و زهد الدنيا ... و الكثير . جميلة ككل ، تجمع بين سلاسة الكلام و متانة التعبير . يا عالم الأسرار علم اليقين يا كاشف الضر عن البائسين يا قابل الأعذار فئنا إلى ظلّك فاقبل توبة التائبين * أفنيتُ عمري في ارتقابِ المُنى و لم أذق في العيش طعم الهنا و إنَّني أُشفق أن ينقضي عمري و ما فارقت هذا العَنا * عاشر من الناس كبار العقول و جانب الجهال أهل الفضول و اشرب نقيع السمّ من عاقلٍ و اسكب على الأرض دواء الجهول

  24. 3 out of 5

    Masoud Irannejad

    از منزل کفر تا به دین ، یک نفس است وز عالم شک تا به یقین ، یک نفس است این یک نفس عزیز را خوش میدار کز حاصل عمر ما همین یک نفس است

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Omar Khayyam (Ghiyāth ad-Dīn Abu'l-Fatḥ ʿUmar ibn Ibrāhīm al-Khayyām Nīshāpūrī: 1048 - 1131), born in Nishapur, educated in Samarkand and professionally active in Bukhara, was a brilliant mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who wrote poetry during the last years of his life,(*) when, after his patrons were killed or removed from power towards the end of the Seljuk sultanate and while new waves of Turkic tribes were breaking over the crumbling walls of Central Asian cities, he gave up scien Omar Khayyam (Ghiyāth ad-Dīn Abu'l-Fatḥ ʿUmar ibn Ibrāhīm al-Khayyām Nīshāpūrī: 1048 - 1131), born in Nishapur, educated in Samarkand and professionally active in Bukhara, was a brilliant mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who wrote poetry during the last years of his life,(*) when, after his patrons were killed or removed from power towards the end of the Seljuk sultanate and while new waves of Turkic tribes were breaking over the crumbling walls of Central Asian cities, he gave up science and returned to Nishapur, broke and despondent. His poetry took the form of quatrains (rubāʿī in the singular) written in New Persian, and he was able to wrest some interesting results from this very constrained form. My GRamazon friend Jan-Maat has written a fine review https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... about the the Ruba'iyat of Omar Khayyam in which he points out the rather limited range of topics of Khayyam's verse: "The themes are the impermanence of life, the unknowability of the future and afterlife, the enjoyment of the present moment and Dust Thou Art, and Unto Dust Shalt Thou Return. A pie chart illustrating Khayyam's poetic impulses would not need many slices." True enough - he graciously didn't mention the innumerable paeans to wine which do tend to become a bit tedious. But there is another aspect to Khayyam's poetry which should be mentioned; his skepticism was expressed in the face of, nay, against the burgeoning movement of dogmatic certainty and intellectual suppression led by stock conservative Islamic theologians and aided by Ghazali (Abū Ḥāmid Muḥammad ibn Muḥammad al-Ghazālī: c. 1058 - 1111), an extremely gifted theologian and jurist trained in Greek philosophy who wrote lucidly against the role of reason and logic in any matter touched upon by religion. The imams were already beginning to significantly tighten the screws on the freedom of thought and expression and producing tens of thousands of cookie cutter ideologues in their new madrasas (Ghazali was the headmaster of one with 3,000 students), and the Sunnis and Shiites were merrily sending each other to Hell in internecine wars for having the temerity of disagreeing.(**) This is the setting in which Khayyam wrote(***) Oh Canon Jurists, we work better than you, With all this drunkenness, we're more sober: You drink men's blood; we, the vine's. Be honest - which of us is more bloodthirsty? The imams were executing people for less. Ghazali demanded in one of his principal texts that those soiled by Greek philosophy should be put to death. That Ghazali himself had studied the Greeks intensively was passed over quietly. A religious man said to a whore, "you're drunk, Caught every moment in a different snare." She replied, "Oh Shaikh, I am what you say, Are you what you seem?" And how about this denial of religious certainty? How long shall I lay bricks on the face of the seas? I am sick of idolators and the temple. Khayyam, who said that there will be a hell? Who's been to hell, and who's been to heaven? Granted, Khayyam probably didn't go down to the bazaar, read these to the general public and call for insurrection (after all, he lived into his 80's). As the relative intellectual freedom of his youth slowly disappeared, as the armies protecting the high civilization of the Central Asian oases met defeat again and again - and let's not forget the personal anguish of an older man whose wealth and success is an unretrievable matter of the past - it is not so difficult to understand his despondency, a despondency which verged upon despair. He even went so far as to deny the value of the intellectual efforts he made as a younger man. My mind has never lacked learning, Few mysteries remained unconned; I have meditated for seventy-two years night and day, To learn that nothing has been learned at all. A number of persons have exerted themselves to demonstrate that Khayyam could not be the author of the most pessimistic quatrains, claiming that he could not be hypocritical or self-contradictory (with respect to his earlier, confident philosophical tomes). Perhaps, but what is more likely is that those authors have some other axe to grind or have never met one of the many elderly persons who end their lives in bitter disappointment under circumstances less crushing than Khayyam's. We don't all go out with the smile of wisdom and serenity upon our faces... (*) S. Frederick Starr is not the least uncertain about this in his excellent Lost Enlightenment https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... (**) The fact that things are no better in these respects one thousand years later is..., well, words fail me. (***) The translations above are the relatively recent renderings of Avery and Heath-Stubbs reviewed by Jan-Maat. They are accounted to be much more faithful to the meaning of the originals, as opposed to the famous English versions of Edward FitzGerald. FitzGerald acknowledged freely that he was "rendering" and not translating Khayyam's verses. I own an edition which contains all five versions of FitzGerald's Ruba'iyat. Here is one of the more heretical poems in FitzGerald's words: The Revelations of Devout and Learn'd Who rose before us, and as Prophets burn'd Are all but Stories, which, awoke from Sleep They told their fellows, and to Sleep return'd. And who, pray tell, would be willing to discard this? The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all your Tears wash out a Word of it. I'm keeping my FitzGerald, but it now shares a shelf with Avery and Heath-Stubbs, who, along with other considerations, translated more than twice as many quatrains as FitzGerald did. Rating http://leopard.booklikes.com/post/865...

  26. 3 out of 5

    محمد غنيم

    الخيام فيلسوف ضل في مسألة القدر فهو جبري النزعة يظن أن الله قد جبر الناس على المعاصي فلا يحق له أو من الظلم أن يسألهم عن ذلك، وهذا ما جعله لا يستنكف عن شرب الخمر والتباهي بها والدعوة إليها، لكنني أجد في رباعياته بضع أبيات توحي بأنه قد رجع عن هذا، ولعله فعل، غير أن فتنتة القدر بين الجبر والاعتزال فتنة عظيمة يندر أن يعود منها أحد إلى الحق دون أن يكون في ننفسه بعض شوائب، أا حكمة العامة المتعلقة بالأصدقاء والصحاب وما إلى ذلك فهي ب\يعة غير أنه قليلة في رباعياته وقد أهدر رباعياته في وصف الخمر وأرى أنه الخيام فيلسوف ضل في مسألة القدر فهو جبري النزعة يظن أن الله قد جبر الناس على المعاصي فلا يحق له أو من الظلم أن يسألهم عن ذلك، وهذا ما جعله لا يستنكف عن شرب الخمر والتباهي بها والدعوة إليها، لكنني أجد في رباعياته بضع أبيات توحي بأنه قد رجع عن هذا، ولعله فعل، غير أن فتنتة القدر بين الجبر والاعتزال فتنة عظيمة يندر أن يعود منها أحد إلى الحق دون أن يكون في ننفسه بعض شوائب، أا حكمة العامة المتعلقة بالأصدقاء والصحاب وما إلى ذلك فهي ب\يعة غير أنه قليلة في رباعياته وقد أهدر رباعياته في وصف الخمر وأرى أنها أخذت فوق حقها لتغني كوكب الشرق بها.. وقد انتقت منها أروع أبياتها إلا قليلا... ويبدوا أنني سأتناول هذه الرباعيات قريبا فبشيء من التفصيل

  27. 3 out of 5

    Nazanin Moshiri

    خیام شخصیتی ست که شناختی ازش نداشتم. حتی به یاد ندارم کتاب های درسی هم توجه خاصی به خودش و یا آثارش داشته باشند. شنیدن پادکست منصور ضابطیان عزیز به بهانه ی سالروز تولد خیام ، انگیزه ای شد برای خواندن رباعیات او و تا حدودی شناختنش... هزاران افسوس که چرا زودتر این گنج رو کشف نکرده بودم. در عین سادگی حیرت انگیز بود. خیام رمز اصلی آرامش و خوشبختی رو سال ها پیش بار ها و بار ها بیان کرده. زندگی در لحظه و لذت از حال...گذشته و آینده رو رها کنیم و از الانمون نهایت لذت رو ببریم. لذتی که قطعا برای هر کس تعریف خیام شخصیتی ست که شناختی ازش نداشتم. حتی به یاد ندارم کتاب های درسی هم توجه خاصی به خودش و یا آثارش داشته باشند. شنیدن پادکست منصور ضابطیان عزیز به بهانه ی سالروز تولد خیام ، انگیزه ای شد برای خواندن رباعیات او و تا حدودی شناختنش... هزاران افسوس که چرا زودتر این گنج رو کشف نکرده بودم. در عین سادگی حیرت انگیز بود. خیام رمز اصلی آرامش و خوشبختی رو سال ها پیش بار ها و بار ها بیان کرده. زندگی در لحظه و لذت از حال...گذشته و آینده رو رها کنیم و از الانمون نهایت لذت رو ببریم. لذتی که قطعا برای هر کس تعریف متفاوتی داره. از حادثه ی زمان راننده مترس وز هر چه رسد چو نیست پاینده مترس این یک دم نقد را به عشرت بگذار وز رفته میاندیش وز آینده مترس         ************** از دی که گذشت هیچ از او یاد مکن فردا که نیامده ست فریاد مکن بر نامده و گذشته بنیاد مکن خوش باش کنون و عمر بر باد مکن         ************* خیام اگر ز باده مستی خوش باش گر با صنمی دمی نشستی خوش باش پایان همه چیز جهان نیستی است پندار که نیستی چو هستی خوش باش

  28. 4 out of 5

    zahra haji

    في رباعيات الخيام نجد الشك والهواجس إلى جانب اليقين والإيمان وحب الحياة و اللهو وشرب الخمر ومن ثم الندم وطلب المغفرة معظم الرباعيات يغلب عليها اليأس والتشاؤم والكثير من التساؤلات حول القضاء و القدر والموت والوجود والهروب من الحيرة والشك ومن الحياة بالشرب قرأتها بترجمة أحمد رامي الأكثر من رائعة أفنيت عمري في ارتقاب المنى .. ولم أذق في العيش طعم الهنا وإنني أشفق أن ينقضى .. عمري وما فارقت هذا العنا لا تأمل الخل المقيم الوفاء .. فإنما أنت بدنيا الرياء تحمل الداء ولا تلتمس .. له دواء وانفرد بالشقاء لن يرج في رباعيات الخيام نجد الشك والهواجس إلى جانب اليقين والإيمان وحب الحياة و اللهو وشرب الخمر ومن ثم الندم وطلب المغفرة معظم الرباعيات يغلب عليها اليأس والتشاؤم والكثير من التساؤلات حول القضاء و القدر والموت والوجود والهروب من الحيرة والشك ومن الحياة بالشرب قرأتها بترجمة أحمد رامي الأكثر من رائعة أفنيت عمري في ارتقاب المنى .. ولم أذق في العيش طعم الهنا وإنني أشفق أن ينقضى .. عمري وما فارقت هذا العنا لا تأمل الخل المقيم الوفاء .. فإنما أنت بدنيا الرياء تحمل الداء ولا تلتمس .. له دواء وانفرد بالشقاء لن يرجع المقدار فيما حكم .. وحملك الهم يزيد الألم ولو حزنت العمر لن ينمحى .. ماخطه في اللوح مر القلم أولى بهذا القلب أن يخفقا .. وفي ضرام الحب أن يحرقا ما أضيع اليوم الذي مر بي .. من غير أن أهوى وأن أعشقا

  29. 3 out of 5

    Zanna

    First, let Orientalism be taken as read. Fitzgerald has not translated Khayyam's poetry, rather has appropriated some of the substance, stripped context from it, shaped it to the white gaze. As Said discusses, his work is regarded as a kind of mining, extracting the raw elements and then refining them to make real art, something an "Oriental" is presumed incapable of. Fitzgerald apparently had a genuine passion for Khayyam's work, but the preface reveals an uncritical view of British imperiali First, let Orientalism be taken as read. Fitzgerald has not translated Khayyam's poetry, rather has appropriated some of the substance, stripped context from it, shaped it to the white gaze. As Said discusses, his work is regarded as a kind of mining, extracting the raw elements and then refining them to make real art, something an "Oriental" is presumed incapable of. Fitzgerald apparently had a genuine passion for Khayyam's work, but the preface reveals an uncritical view of British imperialism. Moreover, he has an irritating habit of randomly capitalising common nouns, which I have refused to reproduce. Thus warned not to find anything genuinely "Persian" in the text, we can proceed cautiously.XXXVIII One moment in annihilation's waste One moment of the well of life to taste The stars are setting and the caravan Starts for the dawn of nothing - Oh make haste!Already I have lost my caution. I know (passingly) the poetry of "heech" (nothing) in Iranian culture, poetry and visual art and I am trying to reconstruct that meaning here. Nothing could be more arcanely English than the expression "O make haste!" and I am upset that I have forgotten the Farsi for "hurry up"... Retranslation: One moment in annihilation/I taste from the well of life and see/the stars are coming down and the caravan/has set out for the dawn of nothing - let them come quickly! XI Here with a loaf of bread beneath the bough A flask of wine, a book of verse and thou Beside me singing in the wilderness And wilderness is paradise enoughThis would be inexcusably cheesy if it weren't for the word "paradise" which has actually come to English from an old Farsi word, I think for a walled garden. Retranslation: Under the trees with bread and wine and a book, and you here with me singing, the wilderness around us is paradise. LXXIV Ah moon of my delight who knowst no wane The moon of heaven is rising once again How oft hereafter rising shall she look Through this same garden after me - in vain!The sense of mournful yearning present in other verses comes to the fore here, but the phrase "moon of my delight" is just hilarious. I am going to call all my friends that from now on. I Awake! For morning in the bowl of night Has flung the stone that puts the stars to flight And ho! The hunter of the East has caught The Sultan's turret in a noose of light.I was much too lazy to read all the notes and variants in the back of the book, but apparently, the act of casting a stone into a bowl was a signal to break camp. This business about a sultan's turret seems a muddle of cultural references to me, but still there is something compelling about this opening to the collection, this cry to awake. Like Tennyson's line come into the garden Maud, for the black bat, night, has flown, it catches the sense of lightness I feel when I am outside at that liminal time when night has ended but the day has not really begun. At that time I cannot be trusted to have critical consciousness; I am liable to cry over any kind of nonsense. The introduction to this edition hopes that the Rubai'yat will be rehabilitated, while I felt it was crumbling under my eyes. Even so, I am susceptible to its dubious charms.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Raya راية

    صفا لك اليوم ورقّ النسيم وجال في الأزهار دمع الغيوم ورجّع البلبل ألحانه يقول هيّا اطرب وخلِّ الهموم يعود السبب الأول في اختياري لهذا الكتاب هو مسلسل أم كلثوم حيث شاهدته مؤخّراً، وأعجبني ولعها في غناء القصائد. حيث قال لها الشيخ أبو العلا محمد وهي لا زالت صبيّة صغيرة في بداية مشوارها، قال لها بأن من يغنّي القصائد يُخلّد في الذاكرة. وبالفعل كانت تهتم بالقصائد وهي بنفسها اختارت أبيات الخيّام هذه التي ترجمها أحمد رامي ولحّنها رياض السنباطي لتكون بذلك إحدى روائع الفن العربي الغنائي الخالدة.. يتأرجح الخيّ صفا لك اليوم ورقّ النسيم وجال في الأزهار دمع الغيوم ورجّع البلبل ألحانه يقول هيّا اطرب وخلِّ الهموم يعود السبب الأول في اختياري لهذا الكتاب هو مسلسل أم كلثوم حيث شاهدته مؤخّراً، وأعجبني ولعها في غناء القصائد. حيث قال لها الشيخ أبو العلا محمد وهي لا زالت صبيّة صغيرة في بداية مشوارها، قال لها بأن من يغنّي القصائد يُخلّد في الذاكرة. وبالفعل كانت تهتم بالقصائد وهي بنفسها اختارت أبيات الخيّام هذه التي ترجمها أحمد رامي ولحّنها رياض السنباطي لتكون بذلك إحدى روائع الفن العربي الغنائي الخالدة.. يتأرجح الخيّام في رباعياته بين عدة موضوعات فتارة يتغزّل ويمدح الخمر ويطرب بشربها ويرى راحته وسعادته في صحبتها وصحبة ندمائها، ومرة يطرح أسئلة عن جدوى الوجود البشري في هذه الحياة وعن حتمية القدر، وأشعاراً عن الحكمة، وعن التأمل وعن اليأس وعن التوبة والتضرّع إلى الله.. ككل استمتعت بقراءة هذه الرباعيات الشهيرة بأفكارها المتنوعة، وترجمة أحمد رامي المتميّزة البسيطة. وشكراً للست التي جعلتني أقرأها. رباعيات الخيام- أم كلثوم: https://youtu.be/CM0cuz7Qt8g ❤ ...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.