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The Mysterious Affair at Styles - Latest Edition 2010 (Hercule Poirot #1)

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The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. It was written in 1916 and was first published by John Lane in the US in October 1920 and in the UK by The Bodley Head (John Lane's UK company) on January 21, 1921. The US edition retailed at $2.00 and the UK edition at seven shillings and sixpence (7/6). It is Christie's first published novel, and int The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. It was written in 1916 and was first published by John Lane in the US in October 1920 and in the UK by The Bodley Head (John Lane's UK company) on January 21, 1921. The US edition retailed at $2.00 and the UK edition at seven shillings and sixpence (7/6). It is Christie's first published novel, and introduces Hercule Poirot, Inspector (later, Chief Inspector) Japp and Lieutenant Hastings (later, Captain). The story is told in first person by Hastings, and features many of the elements that, thanks to Christie, have become icons of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. It is set in a large, isolated country manor. There are a half-dozen suspects, most of whom are hiding facts about themselves. The book includes maps of the house, the murder scene, and a drawing of a fragment of a will. Also, there are a number of red herrings and surprise plot twists.


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The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. It was written in 1916 and was first published by John Lane in the US in October 1920 and in the UK by The Bodley Head (John Lane's UK company) on January 21, 1921. The US edition retailed at $2.00 and the UK edition at seven shillings and sixpence (7/6). It is Christie's first published novel, and int The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a detective novel by Agatha Christie. It was written in 1916 and was first published by John Lane in the US in October 1920 and in the UK by The Bodley Head (John Lane's UK company) on January 21, 1921. The US edition retailed at $2.00 and the UK edition at seven shillings and sixpence (7/6). It is Christie's first published novel, and introduces Hercule Poirot, Inspector (later, Chief Inspector) Japp and Lieutenant Hastings (later, Captain). The story is told in first person by Hastings, and features many of the elements that, thanks to Christie, have become icons of the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. It is set in a large, isolated country manor. There are a half-dozen suspects, most of whom are hiding facts about themselves. The book includes maps of the house, the murder scene, and a drawing of a fragment of a will. Also, there are a number of red herrings and surprise plot twists.

30 review for The Mysterious Affair at Styles - Latest Edition 2010 (Hercule Poirot #1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    mark monday

    Choose Your Own Adventure! You are Captain Arthur Hastings, and you are slowly falling in love with a Belgian. The feelings are embarrassing at first; you find the Belgian himself to be quite an embarrassment. But there is just something about him. Could it be his suave, continental sense of humor... his keen sense of justice... his shapely, rubenesque figure? Or is it simply his hypnotic mustache, perhaps? The passion develops in fits and starts. You don’t want to love him, you really don’t. You Choose Your Own Adventure! You are Captain Arthur Hastings, and you are slowly falling in love with a Belgian. The feelings are embarrassing at first; you find the Belgian himself to be quite an embarrassment. But there is just something about him. Could it be his suave, continental sense of humor... his keen sense of justice... his shapely, rubenesque figure? Or is it simply his hypnotic mustache, perhaps? The passion develops in fits and starts. You don’t want to love him, you really don’t. You don’t want to follow him around, adventure after adventure. You don’t want to be his little bitch, always at his beck and call, sniping and moaning at him but loving it nonetheless. You don’t like mysteries but you are about to fall victim to the greatest mystery of them all: the mystery of the human heart! Try as you may, the Belgian has hold of you, heart and soul. You will follow him forever. If you decide that to love somebody, you must set them free... preferably in Iraq, choose https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... If you decide to follow the little Belgian to the ends of the earth, choose http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    j

    "Dear me, Poirot," I said with a sigh, "I think you have explained everything! And how wonderful of you to wait until page 230 to finally shed light on all your absurd behavior throughout the book, and to justify and the red herrings and narrative padding! But of course, it could only be so in the classic style of a fiendish murder mystery! Why, in fact, though this is but the first case we have solved together, I have no doubt we could do the exact same thing as many as 86 more times, depending "Dear me, Poirot," I said with a sigh, "I think you have explained everything! And how wonderful of you to wait until page 230 to finally shed light on all your absurd behavior throughout the book, and to justify and the red herrings and narrative padding! But of course, it could only be so in the classic style of a fiendish murder mystery! Why, in fact, though this is but the first case we have solved together, I have no doubt we could do the exact same thing as many as 86 more times, depending on if you count the smaller cases!" "Quite so, mon ami," Poirot chuckled. "You make such a reliably dim-witted Watson!" I looked at Poirot in silent amazement. The colossal cheek of the little man! Then we drank some tea and he kissed me passionately, on the mouth.

  3. 3 out of 5

    James

    If you've read my reviews before, you know I love mystery fiction, and in particular, the classics. Agatha Christie died in 1976, and I was born the following year. Two things come to mind... (1) It's a good thing I wasn't alive when she died because I would have been so miserable to be around. (2) Since I was born just about a year later, I'm wondering if maybe a small part of her lives on... as I love her genius and her works of literature... and I can re-read her books over and over again wit If you've read my reviews before, you know I love mystery fiction, and in particular, the classics. Agatha Christie died in 1976, and I was born the following year. Two things come to mind... (1) It's a good thing I wasn't alive when she died because I would have been so miserable to be around. (2) Since I was born just about a year later, I'm wondering if maybe a small part of her lives on... as I love her genius and her works of literature... and I can re-read her books over and over again without ever getting bored. There are tons of reviews of all her major works, and I don't need to be repetitive in my review. What I'd really try to get across is why you need to read ANY of her works, and then why I'd suggest this one: 1. This was one of her first books, and I believe the first published one, in 1920, which means she was probably writing it exactly 100 years ago. And though some of the language is a little different, and it takes place with a different cultural atmosphere, the crux of the story -- its plot, is appropriate at any point in time. People don't love Christie for her beautiful language or her great ideas... yeah, she had some of those... but it's her plots and characters that stand out. And those transcend time. 2. Who else can create such a puzzle that you are constantly trying to guess what's going on? True, tons of writers today, but not 100 years ago. And even with modern writers, it's often in a suspense and thriller type of novel, where it's all about the chase. Christie was all about the calm approach to solving a murder. She didn't try to end each chapter with a big WOW and heart-wrenching scare tactic. It's simple evolution of a timeline, collections of clues, conversations with people... and then you start to see the puzzle come together. But at the last minute, you get the unexpected twist. 3. With this first book, you meet Hercule Poirot, one of her two popular detectives. Poirot is annoying. He's painful. He will make you angry while you are laughing. And that's the cool part. Columbo is the best comparison I can come up with. And I'm certain Columbo was based on large part by Christie's Poirot. So why this book??????? It's the first in the series. It's a prime example of why her stories work. It's the ultimate tale - a family with secrets. It takes place in the UK... the best place to visit and perhaps live. I don't live there, only visited it. :} But it's really the slow build-up of the clues that will have your mind working overtime. So... if you need a Christie stand-alone book, go to "And Then There Were None." If you like female investigators, choose a Miss Marple. If you like a Belgian male detective, flip a coin and pick between Murder on the Orient Express or The Mysterious Affair at Styles. Both will be a great read. But if you need to start at the beginning, go with this one to see what an author's first book looks like. Because if I didn't have my Christie... I'd be like... About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  4. 3 out of 5

    Brina

    February has been a tough month for me this time around. I can't pinpoint it but there have been too many gray days even without the snow on the ground. Spring is mercifully around the corner and with it sun and happier reading times ahead. I tend to read mysteries as palette cleansers in between denser reads but at count I have read four mysteries this month and perhaps I can squeeze in another. In fact, February should be mystery month. On that note, what better way to spend the lingering wint February has been a tough month for me this time around. I can't pinpoint it but there have been too many gray days even without the snow on the ground. Spring is mercifully around the corner and with it sun and happier reading times ahead. I tend to read mysteries as palette cleansers in between denser reads but at count I have read four mysteries this month and perhaps I can squeeze in another. In fact, February should be mystery month. On that note, what better way to spend the lingering winter days with the Queen of Crime, Dame Agatha Christie herself. The Mysterious Affair at Styles is her first case that introduced Hercule Poirot to the world, and, as usual, Dame Christie did not disappoint. Colonel Hastings has been called to Styles Arms at the request of his friend John Cavendish. It is the war years and Hastings is appreciative to take leave of the army. At Styles, Hastings encounters arguments between the various inhabitants of the manor. There is fighting between Mr and Mrs Alfred and Emily Inglethorpe, between Mr Inglethorpe and his cousin Evelyn Howard, between John and Mary Cavendish, and between John and his brother Lawrence. Either the Great War has made the extended Inglethorpe-Cavendish clan tense, or things are not as rosy on the inside of the manor as they appear on the outside. It is in this tense environment that within two nights of Hastings arrival that Mrs Emily Inglethorpe is found dying in her bed. A doctor is summoned and rules Mrs Inglethorpe's death to be murder by strychnine poisoning. Hastings is asked to lead the investigative team but with his narrow mind, he is clueless as to who would want to murder and elderly lady. By chance, a group of Belgians is staying at a cottage close to Styles Arms, and among them is Hastings old friend, the one and only Hercule Poirot. Already highly regarded as a premier detective in his home country, Poirot is summoned by Hastings to assist him in solving this dreadful case. Christie first published The Mysterious Affair at Styles in 1921 and the book has stood the test of time. Poirot mentions that Hastings should use his gray cells, and he seems a step ahead of both Hastings and Scotland Yard Inspector Japp. Inspector Japp almost immediately accuses John Cavendish of murdering his mother and places her on trial, yet Poirot by thoroughly examining each and every clue tells his counterparts to have patience because perhaps a key piece is missing and perhaps the wrong person has been implicated. Yes, John Cavendish can stand to gain in his mother's will from her death but does it make him a murderer. Only Poirot seems to attest to the truth and leads Hastings, the inhabitants of Styles Arms, and Christie's readers on a fact finding mission to unravel the case. As Styles gained in popularity, Christie found that she had a formula that worked with cases starring her famous Belgian detective. As with many of Christie's future cases featuring Poirot, he has all the principal players gather as he explains to them the crime, motive, and guilty party in an easy to follow step by step manner. And as with many cases, Poirot introduces a new piece of evidence toward the end that plays a significant role in the case. Christie's cases are always fun to read even if it is tricky to guess whodunit based on the lack of this key clue. Yet I keep reading her cases and other mysteries to sharpen my mind and keep my little gray cells in order. It is a good thing that February does not last too much longer or I would probably be reading a case featuring the famous Belgian detective before the calendar turns to spring. 4 stars

  5. 3 out of 5

    Tina Haigler

    Ok. Let's get down to business. This is an old fashioned British mystery novel. So much information! Trying to keep it all straight in my head was extremely difficult. My brain was all over the place but that's what makes a good mystery, in my opinion. This is the first book starring the world famous Hercule Poirot and his friend Hastings. Poirot is an eccentric detective from Belgium who fled to England during WWI. Hastings is a little on the dramatic side, always jumps to the wrong conclusions Ok. Let's get down to business. This is an old fashioned British mystery novel. So much information! Trying to keep it all straight in my head was extremely difficult. My brain was all over the place but that's what makes a good mystery, in my opinion. This is the first book starring the world famous Hercule Poirot and his friend Hastings. Poirot is an eccentric detective from Belgium who fled to England during WWI. Hastings is a little on the dramatic side, always jumps to the wrong conclusions, and never catches on to the hints that Poirot throws his way. It definitely helps inject some humor into what would normally be very dour subject matter. The first part of this book (other than the murder of course) is a little slow due to character building, so for about the first 100 pages. After that, Scotland Yard gets involved and that's when things start to get a bit more interesting. The investigation heats up. There are six suspects. People start being cleared or becoming suspicious. At this point it could be anyone. Everyone in this book seems a little shady for one reason or another. The servants seem to be the only ones you don't suspect. Also this book has a lot of dialogue. You have the suspects talking to each other, Poirot interviewing people for information, and Poirot explaining clues, and of course when he reveals everything at the end of the book. I might be a little biased because I love David Suchet as Poirot in the TV show but I really enjoyed this book. It kept me guessing and it was intricate and interesting enough to keep my attention. If you enjoy an old fashioned mystery but have never read Agatha Christie before, this one is a good place to start :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jaline

    To celebrate completing my 1000th book of the decade, I chose Agatha Christie’s first Hercule Poirot mystery novel for this reading slot. I am especially proud of this milestone because earlier in the decade when I was working full-time there was one month (September 2014) where I only read one book and two months where I only read two books (May and June 2012)! Agatha Christie wrote this novel in 1916, and it was first published in the United States by John Lane for $2.00 per copy in October 192 To celebrate completing my 1000th book of the decade, I chose Agatha Christie’s first Hercule Poirot mystery novel for this reading slot. I am especially proud of this milestone because earlier in the decade when I was working full-time there was one month (September 2014) where I only read one book and two months where I only read two books (May and June 2012)! Agatha Christie wrote this novel in 1916, and it was first published in the United States by John Lane for $2.00 per copy in October 1920. It was first published in the United Kingdom by The Bodley Head in January 1921 and could be purchased for seven shillings and sixpence. Another historically significant fact is that when Penguin Books first began publishing in 1935, this novel was one of the first 10 books they published. Agatha Christie did not start out as a Master of the mystery genre, but she persisted and went on to solve some difficult literary problems with the genre via her books – literary problems that had even stumped the illustrious Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. (Specifically, the problem with introducing too many clues that end up canceling each other out). And, she knows her Shakespeare! The line from 1602’s Hamlet is, “Though this be madness yet there is method in it.” In this novel, one of the residents of the Styles estate asks in reference to Hercule Poirot, ”Is he quite mad, Mr. Hastings?” and Hastings replies, ”I honestly don’t know. Sometimes, I feel sure he is as mad as a hatter; and then, just as he is at his maddest, I find there is method in his madness.” For a debut novel, this one is excellent. It is well thought through, the writing is clear and the pace is brisk and entertaining. The characters are all interesting, too. At first I thought I might have to write them all down, but instead I just highlighted their first reference in case I needed to look back. I never had to – before the story is even a couple of chapters in, I knew exactly who all the characters were and what their relationships were to each other. I really had to pay attention while reading this novel. There are, indeed, a plethora of clues. Although Hercule Poirot’s busy mind is sifting them out as they appear, sorting them into mental cubbyholes, and weighing and measuring them, it is true that many of them cancel each other out. Poirot and Hastings (the narrator) are working together, yet Poirot doesn’t disclose all of his deductions to his friend; he tries to prod him into discovering his own deductions. So we have Hastings coming to certain conclusions and Poirot coming to other conclusions. There’s an entire ship load of red herrings in this story! I thoroughly enjoyed this story, and although I did guess the actual culprit at least once, I got there via a different route altogether – and it didn’t stop me from suspecting all the other people in the household of murder either. Agatha Christie, if you did in fact write this novel as a challenge to present a murder mystery that leaves one guessing until Hercule Poirot points his finger, you succeeded with me! One last note: while Agatha Christie and her contemporaries helped to open doors for many of today’s mystery writers (especially women), there were also earlier female mystery writers who opened those doors for Ms Christie and her colleagues. I hope to take this journey with Agatha Christie from novice to master and learn more about how she accomplished that feat.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Hercule Poirot #1), original publication year 1920 Characters: Hercule Poirot, Inspector Japp, Arthur Hastings, John Cavendish, Emily Inglethorp, Alfred Inglethorp, Cynthia Murdoch, Mary Cavendish, Evie Howard, Lawrence Cavendish. Abstract: The famous case that launched the career of Hercule Poirot. When a wealthy heiress is murdered, Poirot steps out of retirement to find the killer. As the master detective makes his way through the list of suspects, he finds the The Mysterious Affair at Styles (Hercule Poirot #1), original publication year 1920 Characters: Hercule Poirot, Inspector Japp, Arthur Hastings, John Cavendish, Emily Inglethorp, Alfred Inglethorp, Cynthia Murdoch, Mary Cavendish, Evie Howard, Lawrence Cavendish. Abstract: The famous case that launched the career of Hercule Poirot. When a wealthy heiress is murdered, Poirot steps out of retirement to find the killer. As the master detective makes his way through the list of suspects, he finds the solution in an elaborately planned scheme almost impossible to believe. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 1998 میلادی و سال 2004 میلادی عنوان یک: «جنایت مرموز»، ترجمه: «قیطاس مردانی‌راد»، نشر: «تهران، پیام عدالت»، چاپ نخست 1372، در 305ص.، چاپ دوم در سال 1377 خورشیدی؛ شابک: 9645977606؛‭ ‏عنوان دو: «طلوع در استایلز: اسرار خانه ییلاقی»، ترجمه: بهرام‌ افراس‍یاب‍ی، نشر: تهران، مراد، 1372، در 333 ص.، شابک: ندارد ‏عنوان سه: «طلوع در استایلز: اسرار خانه ییلاقی»، ترجمه: بهرام‌ افراس‍یاب‍ی، نشر: تهران، مهرفام، 1389، در 333 ص.، شابک: 978-964-9915-13-5؛ عنوان چهار: «قتل در عمارت استایلز»، ترجمه: محی الدین غفرانی، نشر: تهران، ساحل، چاپ نخست ‌1372، چاپ دوم 1373، در 248 ص.، شابک: ندارد عنوان پنج: «اولین پرونده های پوارو»، ترجمه: محمدرضا عمادی، نشر: تهران، هرم، چاپ نخست ‌1383، چاپ دوم 1386، در 248 ص.، شابک: ندارد عنوان شش: «ماجرای اسرارآمیز در استایلز»، ترجمه: رویا سعیدی، نشر: تهران، هرمس، چاپ نخست ‌1382، چاپ دوم 1386، در 248 ص.، چاپ سوم 1390، در 288 صفحه، شابک: 9643631699؛ چکیده: بانوی املاک «استایلز»، «کورت» را در رختخواب خود مرده یافت. او به قتل رسیده بود. اعضای خانواده و نزدیکترین دوستان او مظنون به قتل بودند: «جان کاوندیش»، پسر بزرگ او که بیشترین منافع را میبرد. «آلفرد اینگلتورپ» شوهر او، که به هنگام وقوع جنایت در محل نبود. «مری»، همسر «جان»، درگیر با دکتر «باور اشتاین»، نخستین کسی که آن را قتل نامید. «لارنس کاوندیش» پسر کوچکتر قربانی، که فنجان قهوه جنایت را شست. «اِوِلین هاوارد» که ... «سینتیا مردوک»، تحت سرپرستی مقتول، تنها مظنونی که به سم دسترسی داشت. هر یک میتوانستند قاتل باشند کاپیتان «آرتور هستینگز» که هنوز از جراحتی که در جنگ دیده بهبود نیافته، و در حال گذراندن مرخصی استعلاجی است، از یکی از دوستانش به نام «جان کاوندیش»، نامه‌ ای دریافت می‌کند، که او را دعوت می‌کند تا دوره ی نقاهت خود را در «استایلز کورت» بگذراند. «هستینگز» پس از ورود به «استایلز» با بقیه ی اعضای خانواده «کاوندیش» آشنا می‌شود. از جمله، «امیلی» که خانم خانه و نامادری «جان» و «لارنس کاوندیش» است، و «جان» و «لارنس» برای تامین معاش کاملا وابسته به او هستند. «امیلی» درگیر بعضی فعالیتهای بشردوستانه است، و یکی از این فعالیتها این است که به پناهندگان جنگی، و از جمله گروهی از بلژیکی‌ها کمک می‌کند. «هستینگز» یکی از این پناهندگان را از پیش می‌شناسد. او، کارآگاه معروف، «هرکول پوآرو» است ... «ماجرای اسرارآمیز در استایلز» اثر به یادماندنی ست، نخستین کتابی ست، که «کریستی» نوشته، و نخستین بار است که «پوآرو»، کارآگاه بلژیکی به خوانشگران معرفی می‌شود. «کریستی» نگارش این کتاب را در 1916 میلادی در بحبوحه ی جنگ جهانی نخست، آغاز کردند. ایشان در آن سال­ها، در داروخانه‌ ای در یک بیمارستان، کار، و در اوقات فراغت روی کتاب کار و سعی می‌کردند، به پرونده­ ی پیچیده و کارآگاه عجیب و غریب خویش زندگی ببخشند. «کریستی» پس از پایان نگارش کتاب، آن را برای شش ناشر مختلف ارسال کردند، و همگی آنها کتاب را رد کردند. تا اینکه بالاخره انتشارات «بادلی» پذیرفت، تا کتاب را با شرایطی نه چندان منصفانه منتشر کند. از انتشار کتاب تنها 25 پوند عاید «کریستی» شد یادداشت: کتاب تحت پنج عنوان متفاوت به فارسی بارها منتشر شده، عنوان نخست: «جنایت مرموز»، با ترجمه­ ی قیطاس مردانی‌راد، نشر پیام عدالت، عنوان دوم: «طلوع در استایلز: اسرار خانه ییلاقی» با ترجمه­ ی بهرام افراسیابی، انتشارات مراد، عنوان سوم: «قتل در عمارت استایلز»، با ترجمه محی­ الدین غفرانی، ت‍وس‍ط ان‍‍تش‍ارات ساحل، و عنوان چهارم: «ماجرای اسرارآمیز در استایلز»، با ترجمه رویا سعیدی و نیز عنوان پنجم: «اولین پرونده­ های پوارو» با ترجمه­ ی محمدرضا عمادی، در نشر هرم از متن کتاب: «فکر نکنید در برنامه ریزی و انجام کارهای تبهکارانه استادید، همیشه هستند کسانی که نقشه شوم و پلیدتان را نقش بر آب میکنند». پایان نقل از متن. ا. شربیانی

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    ولأنه يوليو الساخن، والليالي الصيفية تحتاج إلى تشغيل الخلايا الصغيرة بالمخ فقد انتقلنا إلى مدينة ستايلز لجريمة غامضة ورواية أشهر محقق في تاريخ الأدب، هيركول بوارو، بل رواية أجاثا كريستي نفسها الأولي سيدة عجوز ثرية وبيت زوجها الراحل الريفي الكبير، حيث تعيش مع زوجها الجديد الذي يصغرها بكثير، وابني زوجها السابق وزوجة أحدهما وفتاة يتيمة تعطف عليها وعثر عليها مقتولة بالسم..سم في فنجان قهوة وكل أهل البيت مشتبه بهم..بل وشخصيات اخري..لتبدأ الرواية كما تري ياصديقي فأن اهل البيت الذين لا تربط بينهم جميعا صلة ولأنه يوليو الساخن، والليالي الصيفية تحتاج إلى تشغيل الخلايا الصغيرة بالمخ فقد انتقلنا إلى مدينة ستايلز لجريمة غامضة ورواية أشهر محقق في تاريخ الأدب، هيركول بوارو، بل رواية أجاثا كريستي نفسها الأولي سيدة عجوز ثرية وبيت زوجها الراحل الريفي الكبير، حيث تعيش مع زوجها الجديد الذي يصغرها بكثير، وابني زوجها السابق وزوجة أحدهما وفتاة يتيمة تعطف عليها وعثر عليها مقتولة بالسم..سم في فنجان قهوة وكل أهل البيت مشتبه بهم..بل وشخصيات اخري..لتبدأ الرواية كما تري ياصديقي فأن اهل البيت الذين لا تربط بينهم جميعا صلة دم واحدة... هم مجرمون محتملون فكل منهم له مصالح تقضي مع موت العجوز.. لكن شكوكنا كلها غالبا ستتفق علي أحدهم بالاخص...كل الشواهد تقول ذلك ولسوء حظ هاستينج ، الراوي، الذي جاء زيارة صيفية في يوليو الساخن لزيارة صديقه بهذا البيت يجد نفسه مجبرا لتشغيل خلايا مخه الرمادية فيستعين بصديقه اللاجئ البلجيكي الفذ، المحقق بوارو لفك لغز جريمة ستايلز الساخنة كأيام وليالي يوليو الحارة ولكن من مفاجأة لمفاجأة ستحدث.. ستجد ان هناك كثيرا مما تعتقده ليس صحيحا…. حتي مقدمة المراجعة نفسها ،ولنر تحليل المقدمة ولما ليست صحيحة كليا 1-هيراكول بوارو بوارو ليس اشهر محقق في تاريخ الادب..علي الاقل ليس وحده هيركول بوارو ، اشهر محقق سري في تاريخ الأدب يظهر هنا في اول رواية منشورة له في 1920 ، ستجد اسلوبه يتشابه قليلا مع أسلوب سابقه، شيرلوك هولمز الذي صدرت أول رواياته في 1887 ، لآرثر كونان دويل والذي يعد صاحب التأثير في كتابة اجاثا لتلك الشخصية… وبالطبع شيرلوك كان مقتبسا من دوبين لإدجار آلان بو ولكن لهذا مراجعة أخرى ، بل مراجعات مراجعة أول ظهور لشيرلوك هولمز مراجعة أول محقق سري في تاريخ الادب ستجد هنا تشابه بسيط في طريقة تقديم الرواية الاولى مع الاثنان السابقان لبوارو ؛ ** الراوي هو صديق المحقق، وطلب منه المحقق ان يدون له تفاصيل القضية وحكايتها لكن بعكس مقدمة معرفتنا بشيرلوك ودوبين ، الراوي هو صديق قديم لذلك المحقق البلجيكي الفذ ..لكنه بالصدفة يقابله بستايلز بعد الحادث ليشركه في التحقيقات ** بوارو كشيرلوك ودوبين فذ جدا ، أنه يصيب دوما في توقعاته مبكرا جدا في الأحداث ويتحفظ علي توقعه ذلك حتي من شريكه الراوي لذلك دوما يأتي الحل بالنهاية مفاجئا وكأن الاخ بوارو لديه خلايا رمادية خارقة للطبيعة ليمكنه من كل هذا الحدس "الحدس أمرا مذهلا، لا يمكن شرحه...ولا تجاهله" ولكن الاختلافات بين رواية بوارو الاولي وشيرلوك ودوبين أفضل بكثير مما منح اجاثا شهرة اضخم -ومبيعات أعلى علي مر السنوات لدرجة اعادة تجسيد الشخصية في فيلم جديد هذا العام بكنيث بيرناه وهذه الاختلافات في الروايات بينهم اهمها ؛ ** تنوع في الشخصيات ، زيادة في الشكوك في كل الشخصيات...هناك ما يسمي ب"الرنجة الحمراء"، أو أدلة مضللة علي كل شخصية يكشفها بوارو لنا كلها بالنهاية بمفاجآت متعددة -وإن كانت أكثر من اللزوم هنا، ولكن لاتنسى انها الرواية الاولى (النصيحة الدائمة) قد تربكك كثرة الشخصيات، ولكن دوما حاول عمل "توزيع أدوار" الشخصيات علي نجوم سينما في خيالك ليسهل عليك المتابعة ** حبكة رواية أجاثا أسرع كثيرا في الحوار والأحداث عن سابقتيها الكلاسيكية التي تتسم بطول الحوار المبالغ فيه احيانا وطول السرد الروائي ايضا بالرغم من قصر حجم روايتهما عن تلك ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ أجاثا كريستي هي ليست أول ظهور لبوارو، ولا أول رواية لأجاثا كريستي فقد كتبت أجاثا كريستي من قبل قصة قصيرة ظهر بها هيركول بوارو "علبة الشيكولاتة" هي أول قصة له كتبتها في 1909، ولكن هذه تعد أول رواية طويلة له كما انها ليست أولى رواياتها، وأنما أول رواية تنشر لها..مع العلم أنه سبق لها كتابة روايات كثيرة بعضها لم ينشر والبعض نشر بعد هذه الرواية في 1920 وقد كتبتها في 1916 وسط الحرب العالمية العظمي ، وحتي ستجد تأثير الحرب ظاهرا في خلفية الأحداث بالاخص هي سبب ان بوارو البلجيكي لاجئ سياسي بأنجلترا وقتها وعاما، لا يهم الترتيب كثيرا في روايات وقصص بوارو عدا طبعا معرفة أن "ستار" هي روايته الاخيرة وبالمناسبة ستدور أحداثها في نفس مكان تلك الرواية , أول رواية طويلة له هذه مثلا قراءتي الثالثة لبوارو ، بعد "جريمة في قطار الشرق السريع" و "من قتل السيد روجر أركويد"، والاخيرة تلك مشابهة جدا للروايتنا هنا ؛ من ناحية مكان وقوع الاحداث، والشخصيات المحيطة بالقتيل وخريطة حجرة القتيل والاهم ذكر بوارو للحدس النسائي المقتد مراجعة من قتل السيد روجر اركويد ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 3- خلايا المخ الرمادية الصغيرة والخيال نعم، ستعمل الخلايا الصغيرة كما وعدتك بالبداية وكما يقول السيد بوارو بأقصي قوتها أثناء قراءتك الرواية في ليلة من ليالي يوليو الصيفية الحارة...لكن خيالك لن يعرف كيف يحل اللغز الا بالنهاية فقط ايا كان المشتبه به الذي في خيالك الأول سيظهر لك أنه جاني وبرئ اكثر من مرة علي مدار الأحداث..ولكنك لن يشطح خيالك أبدا لتعرف من هو الجاني الحقيقي "أنت تمنح الزمام كثيرا لخيالك ، الخيال شيئا جيدا كخادم ، شيئا سيئا كسيد. التفسير الأبسط هو المحتمل أكثر" ولاننا نحترم مراجعة الروايات البوليسية ، دعنا لا نتحدث اكثر من هذا عن من الحبكة ولكن ادعوك إن لم تبدأ بعد في القراءة لملكة الجريمة علي مر العصور...البدء فورا فالقليل من تشغيل خلايا المخ الرمادية الصغيرة أمرا منشطا للذهن .. والخيال من ستايلز محمد العربي في 9 يوليو 2017

  9. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is Agatha Christie’s debut novel, published in 1920, and the first featuring her detective, Hercule Poirot. By any standards it is an assured and well written debut novel and, considering the period it was written, it is also remarkably undated. Apparently, Agatha Christie was challenged by her sister to write a detective story, for which I am eternally grateful, as this was her offering. Like one of the characters in this novel, Agatha worked in the dispensary of a local hospital and gaine This is Agatha Christie’s debut novel, published in 1920, and the first featuring her detective, Hercule Poirot. By any standards it is an assured and well written debut novel and, considering the period it was written, it is also remarkably undated. Apparently, Agatha Christie was challenged by her sister to write a detective story, for which I am eternally grateful, as this was her offering. Like one of the characters in this novel, Agatha worked in the dispensary of a local hospital and gained a knowledge of poisons, which she used in her novel. She also saw the arrival of Belgian refugees during WWI, which gave her detective his background. Our narrator, Hastings, writes an account of the ‘Affair at Styles.’ He has been invalided home from the Front, when he is invited to stay at Styles with an old friend, John Cavendish. John lives at Styles with his wife, Mary, his brother, Laurence, his step-mother, her companion, Evie Howard and his mother’s ward, Cynthia. Recently, there has been another addition to the household too, as his step-mother has remarried the much younger Alfred Inglethorp. Alfred has caused an air of constraint to the household and, when Mrs Inglethorp is murdered, he is the natural suspect. Nearby, M. Poirot has been staying in a house provided by Mrs Inglethorp, along with other Belgian refugees. Hastings knew Poirot well and, when the murder occurs, he asks him to investigate. This book contains many of the characters that Poirot fans will come to know well – not only Hastings but Detective Inspector James Japp of Scotland Yard. Interestingly, this edition also includes the original, unpublished ending, in which Poirot explains the crime in the courtroom – before this was re-written at the request of the publisher to take place in the drawing room setting that lovers of Golden Age mysteries are very familiar with. A wonderful beginning to my favourite detective series of all time.

  10. 3 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    4★ ‘What have I always told you? Everything must be taken into account. If the fact will not fit the theory—let the theory go.’ ‘Well, we shall see,’ I said, nettled.” Hercule Poirot, world-renowned Belgian detective extraordinaire, first arrived on the literary scene in 1920, in this, Agatha Christie’s very first book. He seems to have arrived fully formed, with all of his eccentricities and powerful “little grey” cells ready to go. “He was hardly more than five feet, four inches, but carried him 4★ ‘What have I always told you? Everything must be taken into account. If the fact will not fit the theory—let the theory go.’ ‘Well, we shall see,’ I said, nettled.” Hercule Poirot, world-renowned Belgian detective extraordinaire, first arrived on the literary scene in 1920, in this, Agatha Christie’s very first book. He seems to have arrived fully formed, with all of his eccentricities and powerful “little grey” cells ready to go. “He was hardly more than five feet, four inches, but carried himself with great dignity. His head was exactly the shape of an egg, and he always perched it a little on one side. His moustache was very stiff and military. The neatness of his attire was almost incredible. I believe a speck of dust would have caused him more pain than a bullet wound.” He is introduced to us by Hastings, a young man returning from the front of WW1 to relax with his old friend John Cavendish at Styles, the Cavendish family estate. John’s mother is the matriarch of the family, whom Hastings remembers from past visits as “a lady who liked to make her own plans, and expected other people to fall in with them, and in this case she certainly had the whip hand, namely: the purse strings.” She’s now made her own plans to the extent that she remarried a rather strange man, twenty years younger, whom nobody seems to like. A gold-digger, perhaps? There are many other characters, all living or staying at Styles, and a few, like Poirot, from the nearby village. This situation became a Christie trademark – a closed group of people “It must be one of us!” living or staying together in a single dwelling (island, train). Someone dies in suspicious circumstances, (of course – this is Agatha Christie, after all), and Hastings asks if he might invite his old friend Poirot, a retired detective who is currently living in the village with a group of Belgians, to help investigate. Ah, the clues are many, the bits of thread, the grains of this or that, the odd timing of someone’s arrival or departure, the pieces of conversation overheard through closed doors – the suspicions! Little locked boxes, locked desks, bolted doors – all part of the mystery. Hastings greatly admires Poirot and knows how clever he is, and is delighted when Poirot compliments him on some observation Hastings offers. But when Poirot seems dismissive of his ‘insight’, Hastings thinks Poirot should count himself lucky that he has Hastings there to consult with. “I shrugged my shoulders. If he was going to take the matter that way, it was no good arguing with him. The idea crossed my mind, not for the first time, that poor old Poirot was growing old. Privately I thought it lucky that he had associated with him some one of a more receptive type of mind. Poirot was surveying me with quietly twinkling eyes. ‘You are not pleased with me, mon ami?’ ‘My dear Poirot,’ I said coldly, ‘it is not for me to dictate to you. You have a right to your own opinion, just as I have to mine.’ ‘A most admirable sentiment,’ remarked Poirot, rising briskly to his feet.” Fortunately, Poirot's twinkling eyes indicate he doesn’t take offence, and Hastings is generous enough to concede (privately, to us) from time to time, that really, the little fellow is something special and can outwit anyone. A delightful introduction to Christie’s enormous, influential body of work. It is a bit dated, (well, of course), and I didn’t find it quite as compelling as I might have when it was first published. But I certainly enjoyed M. Poirot’s (and Christie’s) debut! You can borrow a copy at the Open Library. It's free and easy to search. https://openlibrary.org/

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    How did I go for so long without reading an Agatha Christie?! I wish I'd picked one up sooner! I figured my first read should be the first book published (I have an OCDish need to read books in order) and I have to say that this is a fantastic debut novel. Most authors' work gets better with time - if Christie gets better than this then I have some treats in store! Long story cut short:- Mrs Inglethorp, the old lady owner of Styles Court, suffers a violent fit early one morning and dies. It appea How did I go for so long without reading an Agatha Christie?! I wish I'd picked one up sooner! I figured my first read should be the first book published (I have an OCDish need to read books in order) and I have to say that this is a fantastic debut novel. Most authors' work gets better with time - if Christie gets better than this then I have some treats in store! Long story cut short:- Mrs Inglethorp, the old lady owner of Styles Court, suffers a violent fit early one morning and dies. It appears that foul play is in the air and the family bring in Hercule Poirot to investigate... This book was everything a murder mystery should be. There were intriguing characters (which, incidentally, are nicely fleshed-out), a page-turning plot, plenty of clues and red-herrings and, best of all, it kept me guessing right until the very end. The narration also works well - by having Hastings as the narrator, we don't get to see inside Poirot's head, so we can continue to form our own conclusions right to the end. I also liked how quaint this was. As a reader of more modern thrillers such as James Patterson, Lee Child and David Baldacci, it was nice to realise that there isn't always a requirement for violence, blood and guts in order to have a good plot. I will definitely be picking up more of Christie's work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Araz Goran

    أجاثا كريستي ~ القضية الغامضة في مدينة ستايلز الظهور الأول للشيطان العبقري " بوراو ".. رواية معقدة، مرهقة، مليئة بالمفاجأت والتقلبات الغريبة، في كل لحضة يتجه عقلك وتفكيرك نحو أحد المشتبه بهم (وهم كُثر) ، ولا داعي للحرج عندما تكون مخطئاً في كل مرة.. لا تحاول .. لا تورط نفسك وتبحث عن القاتل هنا .. دع المسألة للوقت فحسب، النهاية وحدها يمكن أن تأتيك بهوية القاتل أو القاتلة !! عبقرية جداً....

  13. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    This is the first published novel of Agatha Christie, and the first to feature her famous detective character, Hercule Poirot. So far this is my favorite Christie novel, but I have only read three which leaves me well short of knowing which are her best. The novel was narrated by Arthur Hastings, Mr. Poirot’s assistant, who seemed somewhat unreliable, and incapable of understanding the significance of any clue presented to him. I give it 3.5 stars and a good but not great.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Lawyer

    The Mysterious Affair at Styles: Meeting Hercule Poirot Dame Agatha Christie was born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller on 15 September 1890 in Torquay, Devon, South West England and lived a very full life until her death by natural causes on 12 January 1976. During those eighty-five years the lady published sixty-six novels and fourteen short story collections, becoming the best selling author in history, outsold only by the Bible. Agatha Christie as a child Christie's remarkable life as a writer h The Mysterious Affair at Styles: Meeting Hercule Poirot Dame Agatha Christie was born Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller on 15 September 1890 in Torquay, Devon, South West England and lived a very full life until her death by natural causes on 12 January 1976. During those eighty-five years the lady published sixty-six novels and fourteen short story collections, becoming the best selling author in history, outsold only by the Bible. Agatha Christie as a child Christie's remarkable life as a writer had to begin somewhere. She was homeschooled by her father. Although her mother didn't want her to read before she was eight, young Agatha, bored, taught herself to read by age five. Agatha was the recipient of her Mother Clara's gifted storytelling. Her first writing would be short stories. It was this book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, published by John Lane of the Bodley Head in London in 1921. Curiously, The Times published it completely as a serial to great reception. Even more curious is that Christie's first book was offered by Lane to be published in the United States in 1920. Both the American and subsequent English editions featured the same dust jacket. < blockquote> The Mysterious Affair at Styles, First Edition, The Bodley Head, London, 1921 Oddly enough, Agatha Christie wrote her first Poirot novel on a bet with her older sister Madge that Agatha could not write a detective novel. But Agatha, who had a taste for mysteries, had cut her teeth on The Woman in White and The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins, and the Sherlock Holmes stories by A. Conan Doyle. Christie took the bet. Agatha had met and married Archie Christie in 1914. Her husband fought in World War One as a fighter pilot. While her husband was overseas, Christie began The Mysterious Affair at Styles in 1916, the year in which the novel is set. Conveniently, Christie volunteered at a hospital where she worked in the dispensary. She learned quite a bit about poisons, how they worked, the symptoms, and the anomalies in which poisons did not always cause the expected reaction. So, Hercule Poirot was born. Her inspiration was a group of Belgian refugees living in her hometown of Torquay. From her Autobiography, Christie wrote: "Then I remembered our Belgian refugees. We had quite a colony of Belgian refugees living in the parish of Tor. Why not make my detective a Belgian? I thought. There were all types of refugees. How about a refugee police officer? A retired police officer. Not too young a one. What a mistake I made there. The result is that my fictional detective must really be well over a hundred now. Anyway, I settled on a Belgian detective." Christie's debut novel was well received both in England and the United States. Copies sold briskly. Incredibly, Agatha Christie earned only 25 Pounds for her novel, something that would change with her future novels subject to more favorable contracts. The Bodley Head summarized the plot simply on the original dust jacket. "Introducing Hercule Poirot, the brilliant – and eccentric – detective who, at a friend's request, steps out of retirement – and into the shadows of a classic mystery on the outskirts of Essex. The victim is the wealthy mistress of Styles Court, found in her locked bedroom with the name of her late husband on her dying lips. Poirot has a few questions for her fortune-hunting new spouse, her aimless stepsons, her private doctor, and her hired companion. The answers are positively poisonous. Who's responsible, and why, can only be revealed by the master detective himself." Today the setting in an English Country Manor seems in no way original. But Christie ushered in the Golden Age of Mystery with Poirot's debut. Author Robert Barnard, in appreciation of Christie's work had this to say: In general The Mysterious Affair at Styles is a considerable achievement for a first-off author. The country-house-party murder is a stereotype in the detective-story genre, which Christie makes no great use of. Not her sort of occasion, at least later in life, and perhaps not really her class. The family party is much more in her line, and this is what we have here. This is one of the few Christies anchored in time and space: we are in Essex, during the First World War. The family is kept together under one roof by the exigencies of war and of a matriarch demanding rather than tyrannical – not one of her later splendid monsters, but a sympathetic and lightly shaded characterisation. If the lifestyle of the family still seems to us lavish, even wasteful, nevertheless we have the half sense that we are witnessing the beginning of the end of the Edwardian summer, that the era of country-house living has entered its final phase. Christie takes advantage of this end-of-an-era feeling in several ways: while she uses the full range of servants and their testimony, a sense of decline, of break-up is evident; feudal attitudes exist, but they crack easily. The marriage of the matriarch with a mysterious nobody is the central out-of-joint event in an intricate web of subtle changes. The family is lightly but effectively characterised, and on the outskirts of the story are the villagers, the small businessmen, and the surrounding farmers – the nucleus of Mayhem Parva. It is, too, a very clever story, with clues and red herrings falling thick and fast. We are entering the age when plans of the house were an indispensable aid to the aspirant solver of detective stories, and when cleverness was more important than suspense. But here we come to a problem that Agatha Christie has not yet solved, for cleverness over the long length easily becomes exhausting, and too many clues tend to cancel each other out, as far as reader interest is concerned. These were problems which Conan Doyle never satisfactorily overcame, but which Christie would." Christie won that bet with Sister Madge. Repeatedly.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    This is the first installment in the Hecule Poirot series and was just as brilliant as every other detective book I have read by the undoubted Queen of crime fiction! The novel is set in an English manor house, Styles, owned by the the Cavendish family. Hastings, our protagonist, is staying with the family in their regal abode when the unexpected and inexplicable murder of Emily Cavendish (or the more recently referred to, Emily Inglethorpe) occurs. The murder scene, a locked bedroom, baffles det This is the first installment in the Hecule Poirot series and was just as brilliant as every other detective book I have read by the undoubted Queen of crime fiction! The novel is set in an English manor house, Styles, owned by the the Cavendish family. Hastings, our protagonist, is staying with the family in their regal abode when the unexpected and inexplicable murder of Emily Cavendish (or the more recently referred to, Emily Inglethorpe) occurs. The murder scene, a locked bedroom, baffles detectives and family alike, and it is up to the famous Belgian detective to solve this unsolvable puzzle. I already knew a death would occur before I even turned the first page, as this is a Christie novel, but that didn't dampen the thrilling atmosphere. The emphasis placed on Mrs Cavendish/Inglethorp's "as yet untasted coffee" early in the novel also led me to a premature conclusion concerning the victim and the means of her demise. Even this didn't hamper my enjoyment, but added to it: I adore playing the amateur sleuth and seeing if my predictions come true. And that is where Christie's brilliance lies. She involves the reader in the crime and places them in Poirot's role, in the hope of uncovering the clues that will lead to the answer of 'whoddunit?'. I love Christie for giving us an almost voyeuristic insight into the historical upper-class. I also love that the characters continually dismiss Poirot. I have also experienced this in the Miss Marple series. Both are deemed 'past it' when they don't jump to the same, obvious conclusion as the other characters, yet the reader knows who will ultimately be proven correct. As always, Christie takes the reader in a series of previously unsuspected direction before all is revealed and solved just before the close of the novel. This, as with all her other works, left me completely baffled throughout as to who the perpetrator of the crime was. I am no Poirot, but I enjoy attempting to assume his role in these thrilling insights into historical England.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: We strained and heaved together. The framework of the door was solid, and for a long time it resisted our efforts, but at last we felt it give beneath our weight, and finally, with a resounding crash, it was burst open. We stumbled in together, Lawrence still holding his candle. Mrs. Inglethorp was lying on the bed, her whole form agitated by violent convulsions, in one of which she must have overturned the table beside her. As we entered, however, her limbs relaxed, and she fell back up EXCERPT: We strained and heaved together. The framework of the door was solid, and for a long time it resisted our efforts, but at last we felt it give beneath our weight, and finally, with a resounding crash, it was burst open. We stumbled in together, Lawrence still holding his candle. Mrs. Inglethorp was lying on the bed, her whole form agitated by violent convulsions, in one of which she must have overturned the table beside her. As we entered, however, her limbs relaxed, and she fell back upon the pillows. John strode across the room, and lit the gas. Turning to Annie, one of the housemaids, he sent her downstairs to the dining-room for brandy. Then he went across to his mother whilst I unbolted the door that gave on the corridor. I turned to Lawrence, to suggest that I had better leave them now that there was no further need of my services, but the words were frozen on my lips. Never have I seen such a ghastly look on any man's face. He was white as chalk, the candle he held in his shaking hand was sputtering onto the carpet, and his eyes, petrified with terror, or some such kindred emotion, stared fixedly over my head at a point on the further wall. It was as though he had seen something that turned him to stone. I instinctively followed the direction of his eyes, but I could see nothing unusual. The still feebly flickering ashes in the grate, and the row of prim ornaments on the mantelpiece, were surely harmless enough. THE BLURB: Poirot, a Belgian refugee of the Great War, is settling in England near the home of Emily Inglethorp, who helped him to his new life. His friend Hastings arrives as a guest at her home. When the woman is killed, Poirot uses his detective skills to solve the mystery. MY THOUGHTS: Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was the result of a dare from her sister Madge who challenged her to write a story. Thank you Madge! But for this sisterly dare, we may never have been able to read the delightful detective stories Miss Christie is so famous for. And although The Mysterious Affair at Styles was her first novel, I think it remains of the best. All through listening, I was changing my mind as to the identity of the murderer. And, in the end, I was still wrong! I listened to the audio version of The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie, narrated by Hugh Fraser, via OverDrive. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the 'about' page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my blog sandysbookaday.wordpress.com https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I'm a long time Agatha Christie fan, and I recently decided to re-read some of her novels. ***** 'The Mysterious Affair at Styles' is Agatha Christie's first published book, and it's less sophisticated than her later work. The story does, however, introduce three well-known Christie characters: Hercule Poirot, Captain Hastings, and Inspector Japp. As the book opens Hastings has been injured in WWI and is recuperating at Styles Court, a manor house in the country. Styles Court belongs to the Cave I'm a long time Agatha Christie fan, and I recently decided to re-read some of her novels. ***** 'The Mysterious Affair at Styles' is Agatha Christie's first published book, and it's less sophisticated than her later work. The story does, however, introduce three well-known Christie characters: Hercule Poirot, Captain Hastings, and Inspector Japp. As the book opens Hastings has been injured in WWI and is recuperating at Styles Court, a manor house in the country. Styles Court belongs to the Cavendish family, and is currently occupied by a diverse assemblage of people, including: Emily Inglethorpe - the widow of the late Mr. Cavendish - who inherited a lifetime interest in the house AND a large sum of money; Emily's new - much younger - husband, Alfred Inglethorpe; Emily's adult stepson, John Cavendish; John's wife Mary; John's bachelor brother Lawrence; Evelyn Howard - Emily's longtime friend and companion; Cynthia Murdoch - the orphaned daughter of family friends; and Dorcas, the maid. There's a tense atmosphere at Styles because of simmering resentments and secrets. For example: John Cavendish - who'll inherit the manor house when his stepmother dies - thinks it should have been his all along; in addition, John is suspected of dallying with the pretty wife of a neighboring farmer. John's wife Mary, in turn, spends a lot of time with Dr. Bauerstein - the local toxicologist who hails from Germany. To add to this 'quadrangle', Captain Hastings has a crush on beautiful Mary. Evelyn Howard hates Alfred Inglethorpe, convinced he only married Emily for her money. Alfred Inglethorpe's thick beard looks like a disguise, and he has long poorly explained absences. Lawrence Cavendish resents Cynthia Murdoch, who's very aware of her status as an 'outsider'; Cynthia supports herself with a job in a pharmacy.....and she seems to be the only one of this bunch who's actually employed. As it happens, a group of Belgian refugees, including Hercule Poirot, are living in a house near Styles Court - an arrangement facilitated by Emily Inglethorpe. Hastings is thrilled to see Poirot and lauds the former policeman's detective skills - so it's clear they've met before. In the midst of the testy atmosphere at Styles Court Emily Inglethorpe dies from strychnine poisoning - in a locked room. Hastings suspects foul play and prevails on Poirot to investigate, and the Belgian complies.....with Hastings as his partner. To round out the 'detective trio', Inspector Japp is assigned to the case. During the investigation Poirot learns that Emily had a loud fight with an unknown male on the day before she died; Emily's latest will is missing; there have been shenanigans with Emily's locked document box; someone bought strychnine at the town's pharmacy; coffee and cocoa were consumed on the evening of the murder....and a cup has been smashed; there's something suspicious about Emily's medicine packets; etc. As often happens in these stories, Poirot makes shrewd deductions about everything.....but doesn't share them; Hastings tries to demonstrate his investigative skills but misinterprets most of the clues; and Japp hares off after the wrong suspect(s). The book is chock full of misdirection and red herrings, but - in the end - Poirot gathers the suspects and reveals the truth. The book is just so-so. Though Christie's nascent writing skills are apparent, the plot is overly convoluted (to the point of unbelievability); Poirot talks too much (yak yak yak); and there's a whiff of anti-Semitism and classism (though this is common in Christie's books......a sign of her times.) If you're a long time Agatha Christie fan, this book would make a fun re-read; and if you're new to the famous author's works, this is a good place to start. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  18. 4 out of 5

    Piyangie

    This is my first introduction to Agatha Christie. Having never read her before, I thought of starting her with the Poirot series which includes her famous detective, Hercule Poirot. The story is a cleverly written murder mystery with interesting twists and turns so as to not give out who the culprit is. The characters were all nice and likable. The eccentric Poirot (it seems detectives are rather eccentric people; Sherlock Holmes comes to my mind!) and his friend and narrator, Mr. Hastings provi This is my first introduction to Agatha Christie. Having never read her before, I thought of starting her with the Poirot series which includes her famous detective, Hercule Poirot. The story is a cleverly written murder mystery with interesting twists and turns so as to not give out who the culprit is. The characters were all nice and likable. The eccentric Poirot (it seems detectives are rather eccentric people; Sherlock Holmes comes to my mind!) and his friend and narrator, Mr. Hastings provided the contrasting points of view on the case keeping the reader in curious wonder as to the turn of the events. Overall, it was a very interesting first read. I'm very glad to have finally started up with Agatha Christie, though a little late in my reading life. I certainly have missed on a great murder mystery author.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder*

    I have a goal to read all of Poirot's stuff - order isn't terribly important for this type of 'series', but I don't want to touch his final act and book, Curtain, until I've read the others. Just an OCD reader thing. The mystery itself was baffling (closed room rocks), but I didn't care much until the surprising end about the culprit. It's hard to explain why, but maybe because the characters didn't draw me in much, besides the main detective Poirot and the semi-clueless Hastings. The book was co I have a goal to read all of Poirot's stuff - order isn't terribly important for this type of 'series', but I don't want to touch his final act and book, Curtain, until I've read the others. Just an OCD reader thing. The mystery itself was baffling (closed room rocks), but I didn't care much until the surprising end about the culprit. It's hard to explain why, but maybe because the characters didn't draw me in much, besides the main detective Poirot and the semi-clueless Hastings. The book was completely enjoyable, though, as Poirot shines when he's introduced in this first book featuring the Belgian detective. He doesn't focus on his mustache quite as much yet, alludes to the little grey cells only once, but steals the scenes wherever he goes. Hastings is amusing - I admit some of his books I found dry but I'll have to revisit - but here he's likable as the narrator. I don't get his thing for the women, though, were all men so easily led into marriage back then? Even if I felt little for the victim or cared about the accused cast, I didn't figure out the ending and liked the neat curveball Christie threw the readers way, something I never saw coming. The clues add up but, like Hastings, I'm too dense to get them. It's amazing how Agatha could conceive and hold all that in her mind, but then there is a reason she still stands as one of the very best in detective fiction. Overall a great book featuring Poirot. It's a fast, smooth read with stylish dialogue, a few twists thrown in every few chapters to keep the waters from feeling too calm and keeping the readers mind working. I wasn't entranced by the players, though, so this is not a five-star rating. Still, it's worth a read for mystery fans.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Ayman Gomaa

    اول تجربة مع ملكة الروايات البوليسية :) بعد قراءة كثير من الروايات البوليسية يتملكك الغرور انك تستطيع التخمين القاتل و السر فى نهاية الرواية او على الاقل تشك باحد الافراد و لكن اجاثا كريسيتى غير اى روائىة xD رواية مشوقة و اول تجربة مع المفتش بوارو المبدع ملك التحليل و التفاصيل كم التقلبات فى احداث الرواية و محاولة الشك فى شخص معين ملوش اى لازمة مع اجاثا اقرا و استمتع و تقبل انك لن تتوقع ابدا القاتل مع اجاثا :)

  21. 3 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    The first Poirot. Everybody has a motive, everyone acts suspiciously--and the customary floor plans are provided.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Well this was a nice surprise! I *don’t do* cosy mysteries, or at least not for several decades. I’ve read a few Christies in my time but it’s the tv series and films that I remember more. So I can’t really explain the urge I got to read one; several of my goodread friends regularly read or re-read them so maybe it was their influence! So I started right at the beginning. I fought liking it for the first few chapters and then just gave in and enjoyed it. It’s hilarious that Hastings has pretensi Well this was a nice surprise! I *don’t do* cosy mysteries, or at least not for several decades. I’ve read a few Christies in my time but it’s the tv series and films that I remember more. So I can’t really explain the urge I got to read one; several of my goodread friends regularly read or re-read them so maybe it was their influence! So I started right at the beginning. I fought liking it for the first few chapters and then just gave in and enjoyed it. It’s hilarious that Hastings has pretensions to be a detective himself because he isn’t terribly bright! : “Yes, he is intelligent. But we must be more intelligent. We must be so intelligent that he does not suspect us of being intelligent at all." I acquiesced. "There, mon ami, you will be of great assistance to me." I was pleased with the compliment. There had been times when I hardly thought that Poirot appreciated me at my true worth. I even enjoyed the little maps and diagrams! I have to say as well that the Poirot tv series with John Suchet, from years ago, was really excellent as I could still visualise it as I was reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Thus begins the sleuthing adventures of that diminutive Belgian private detective Hercule Poirot! The setting is an English country manor house during World War I. The lady of the house has a will, potentially multiple wills, and just about everybody at the house has some reason for wishing her dead, or at least suspecting the others with vehement certitude. Nearly everyone's got a motive and red herrings are flying about the place like, well, like flying fish! I loved the WWI details and such how Thus begins the sleuthing adventures of that diminutive Belgian private detective Hercule Poirot! The setting is an English country manor house during World War I. The lady of the house has a will, potentially multiple wills, and just about everybody at the house has some reason for wishing her dead, or at least suspecting the others with vehement certitude. Nearly everyone's got a motive and red herrings are flying about the place like, well, like flying fish! I loved the WWI details and such how Poirot and some fellow Belgian refugees are guest to the English and soldiers are convalescing at houses such as this. Interesting slice of wartime life. I've read a few of Agatha Christie's Poirot books before and grown fond of the recurring characters, so it was nice to finally see where it all began. While not her best work, I believe The Mysterious Affair at Styles is Christie's very first work, and with that in mind, this ain't half bad! I don't know if it deserves four stars, because I'm a fan and was happy to get some insights into the main characters that would carry this series into the dozens. This book lays the blueprint for many (most?) of her others, which would be written with varying degrees of skill, some better and some worse than this one. So I don't mind giving it the rating I did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)

    *3.5/5

  25. 3 out of 5

    Jadranka

    "Tajanstveni događaj u Stajlsu" je pisan prepoznatljivim stilom Agate Kristi, a značajan je iz najmanje dva razloga:ovo je roman prvenac Kraljice detektivskih romana i ujedno putem njega Agata nas upoznaje sa jednim od najpoznatijih književnih likova uopšte - reč je naravno o belgijskom detektivu Herkulu Poarou. Zaleđinu za lik simpatičnog detektiva pronašla je u okolnosti da su u njen rodni grad stigle izbeglice iz Belgije koje su tražile utočište pred Prvi svetski rat. Agata Kristi je "Tajanstv "Tajanstveni događaj u Stajlsu" je pisan prepoznatljivim stilom Agate Kristi, a značajan je iz najmanje dva razloga:ovo je roman prvenac Kraljice detektivskih romana i ujedno putem njega Agata nas upoznaje sa jednim od najpoznatijih književnih likova uopšte - reč je naravno o belgijskom detektivu Herkulu Poarou. Zaleđinu za lik simpatičnog detektiva pronašla je u okolnosti da su u njen rodni grad stigle izbeglice iz Belgije koje su tražile utočište pred Prvi svetski rat. Agata Kristi je "Tajanstveni događaj u Stajlsu" počela da piše još 1916.godine, a roman je svetlost dana ugledao tek pet goodina kasnije - 1921.godine. Prethodno je rukopis bio odbijen od strane više izdavača. Dodatna zanimljivost vezana za ovaj roman je ta da je na nagovor izdavača Agata izmenila prvobitnu verziju rukopisa. Naime, u prvobitnoj verziji Herkul Poaro zločin objašnjava sa mesta za svedoke za vreme suđenja. Međutim, na nagovor Džona Lejna (suosnivača izdavačke kuće koja je roman izdala) pristaje da to promeni, i mada samo razjašnjenje ostaje isto, Poaro ga ne daje za vreme suđenja već ubicu razotkriva pred publikom okupljenom u privatnom salonu. Upravo to će biti okruženje koje će Agata često koristiti i u svojim kasnijim romanima. U ovo izdanje je uključen i prvobitni završetak u sudnici, pa je na čitaocima da prosude koja je verzija bolja i prihvatljivija.

  26. 3 out of 5

    abby

    This was Agatha's Christie's first novel, and, as such, I was prepared for it to be a bit rough, but this was delightful. Maybe it seems odd to use such a cheery word to describe a murder mystery, but, let's face it, Christie's books are like dinner theater. The actor who plays the victim will pop out from behind the curtain very much alive when all is said and done. Mrs. Inglethorp raised her two stepsons as her own, but there are tensions between them when she inherits the family home, Styles, This was Agatha's Christie's first novel, and, as such, I was prepared for it to be a bit rough, but this was delightful. Maybe it seems odd to use such a cheery word to describe a murder mystery, but, let's face it, Christie's books are like dinner theater. The actor who plays the victim will pop out from behind the curtain very much alive when all is said and done. Mrs. Inglethorp raised her two stepsons as her own, but there are tensions between them when she inherits the family home, Styles, and her late husband's fortune over the boys. Now that she has remarried, the sons worry that they might be overlooked again in favor of her scoundrel of a new husband. Yes, it seems Mrs. Inglethorp is surrounded by fortune hunters, and there's no shortage of suspects when she is poisoned in the middle of the night. But while she might not be beloved by her family, Mrs. Inglethorp gained a reputation for her generosity to the Belgian people during WW1. And one specific Belgian, Hercule Poirot, is determined to get to the bottom of her murder. I very much enjoyed Poirot's friend Hastings as the narrator, particularly because made himself an unsuspecting idiot the whole book. Hastings is weirdly jealous and a bit of a creeper over his friend's wife, so he deserves it. I didn't see the murderer coming, and the reveal was a nice surprise. And while there's the pinch of racism, smidgen of anti-semitism, and heaping tablespoon of anti-sexism you'd expect from a novel written in 1920, sometimes I get the impression Christie is mocking in her usage. I'm becoming a bit of an addict for her books, and I can't wait to read more.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    This was the book that started it all for Agatha Christie, according to the wiki article about her. It certainly was the book that started it all for Hercule Poirot and his friend Hastings. I have never read much of Christie's work, and chose this title for my Literary Birthday challenge for that very reason. I have seen episodes of both Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple on television in the past so it was very easy to picture our famous detective and his partner while I was reading. Seeing these s This was the book that started it all for Agatha Christie, according to the wiki article about her. It certainly was the book that started it all for Hercule Poirot and his friend Hastings. I have never read much of Christie's work, and chose this title for my Literary Birthday challenge for that very reason. I have seen episodes of both Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple on television in the past so it was very easy to picture our famous detective and his partner while I was reading. Seeing these shows also prepared me for the relationship between Hastings and Poirot as well as the typical 'gather all the suspects into one room and confront them with the truth' style of revealing the solution. The story itself was interesting for me to a point. I don't read too many mysteries and I honestly could not get caught up in any of the characters other than Poirot himself. I made the usual guesses about 'whodunnit'; changed my mind several times, and never did choose the correct culprit. But the explanations at the end were clear and made sense, so I was satisfied. A few things did capture my attention: 1. Hastings at one point describes an attorney's appearance and says he had a lawyer's mouth....now what exactly would that be? 2. We know Poirot is a tidy man, a fussy dresser very careful of his appearance, that's fine and dandy. But there were two scenes that seemed a little odd and I wonder if in future books Christie ever explains the detective's concern about spent matches. He picks up one that John tosses into the shrubbery, then later he puts some used matches in a china pot in his room. What does he plan to do with them? Why does he care about those used matches? Why do I care that he cared? And here are some nifty examples of Hercule Poirot's mind at work: Scolding Hastings: "You gave too much rein to your imagination. Imagination is a good servant, and a bad master. The simplest explanation is always the most likely." Another scolding for Hastings (he certainly never seemed too bright compared to Poirot): "What have I always told you? Everything must be taken into account. If the fact will not fit the theory—let the theory go." And finally, Poirot simply thinking:"Instinct is a marvellous thing," mused Poirot. "It can neither be explained nor ignored." I do not really see myself rushing off to read more Christie after this, but it was fun to meet Poirot on the written page at last and not just on the small screen.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    When Hastings was visiting friends at Styles Court in Essex he had no idea what was about to happen. The shock the death of the elderly owner of the property caused was such that there were many suspects. Hastings quickly found his old friend Detective Hercule Poirot, who was also visiting town, and asked him to become involved. After all, the little Frenchman was well-known for his ability to solve even the most mysterious of mysteries. But would he be outdone this time? Hastings thought he knew When Hastings was visiting friends at Styles Court in Essex he had no idea what was about to happen. The shock the death of the elderly owner of the property caused was such that there were many suspects. Hastings quickly found his old friend Detective Hercule Poirot, who was also visiting town, and asked him to become involved. After all, the little Frenchman was well-known for his ability to solve even the most mysterious of mysteries. But would he be outdone this time? Hastings thought he knew whodunit – but Poirot was keeping his thoughts to himself, much to Hastings’ annoyance. Was it because he didn't know? Was the magnificent Poirot stumped this time? The Mysterious Affair at Styles is the first in the Hercule Poirot mystery series by Agatha Christie and it was a lot of fun. I enjoy reading of the Frenchman’s antics, and this was no exception. Recommended.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    The Mysterious Affair at Styles was a fun quick read. This book is Agatha Christie’s first published novel and the first to feature the famous Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. Beloved by many for being a completely pompous prig, this character launched Christie’s career and ultimately resulted in her books being the most widely read in history selling millions of copies. This author, perhaps being outsold only by Shakespeare or the Bible, has to have been doing something right. In this debut no The Mysterious Affair at Styles was a fun quick read. This book is Agatha Christie’s first published novel and the first to feature the famous Belgian detective Hercule Poirot. Beloved by many for being a completely pompous prig, this character launched Christie’s career and ultimately resulted in her books being the most widely read in history selling millions of copies. This author, perhaps being outsold only by Shakespeare or the Bible, has to have been doing something right. In this debut novel, we cover some familiar territory. A rich old woman, living in an English Mansion, has been murdered. We have a body, a murder weapon, some strange clues, and a well experienced detective that already has it all figured out. So sit back on that cozy couch, sip some hot coffee, and read The Mysterious Affair at Styles. What more could you love?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mwanamali

    What did I think? Satisfaction...

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