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The Jungle Book (Illustrated): with free audiobook download (English Classics 5)

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This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the ever popular classic The Jungle Book. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** *** The Jungle Book is a collection of stories by English author Rudyard Kip This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the ever popular classic The Jungle Book. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** *** The Jungle Book is a collection of stories by English author Rudyard Kipling. The tales in the book are fables, using animals in an anthropomorphic manner to give moral lessons. The verses of The Law of the Jungle, for example, lay down rules for the safety of individuals, families, and communities. Kipling put in them nearly everything he knew or "heard or dreamed about the Indian jungle." Other readers have interpreted the work as allegories of the politics and society of the time. The best-known of them are the three stories revolving around the adventures of Mowgli, an abandoned "man cub" who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. The most famous of the other four stories are probably "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the story of a heroic mongoose, and "Toomai of the Elephants", the tale of a young elephant-handler. As with much of Kipling's work, each of the stories is followed by a piece of verse.


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This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the ever popular classic The Jungle Book. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** *** The Jungle Book is a collection of stories by English author Rudyard Kip This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the ever popular classic The Jungle Book. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** *** The Jungle Book is a collection of stories by English author Rudyard Kipling. The tales in the book are fables, using animals in an anthropomorphic manner to give moral lessons. The verses of The Law of the Jungle, for example, lay down rules for the safety of individuals, families, and communities. Kipling put in them nearly everything he knew or "heard or dreamed about the Indian jungle." Other readers have interpreted the work as allegories of the politics and society of the time. The best-known of them are the three stories revolving around the adventures of Mowgli, an abandoned "man cub" who is raised by wolves in the Indian jungle. The most famous of the other four stories are probably "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi", the story of a heroic mongoose, and "Toomai of the Elephants", the tale of a young elephant-handler. As with much of Kipling's work, each of the stories is followed by a piece of verse.

8 review for The Jungle Book (Illustrated): with free audiobook download (English Classics 5)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Luca Ambrosino

    English (The Jungle Book) / Italiano I didn't know that "The Jungle Book" was a collection of tales. Thanks to the Disney movie, I had always identified this novel with the story of Mowgli, the man cub raised by a pack of wolves. But another bedtime reading to my daughter makes me discover that this book is made up of seven stories, and only three of them tell about Mowgli ("Mowgli's Brothers", "Kaa's Hunting" and "Tiger! Tiger!"). The search for a place to live safe from hunters is told in "The English (The Jungle Book) / Italiano I didn't know that "The Jungle Book" was a collection of tales. Thanks to the Disney movie, I had always identified this novel with the story of Mowgli, the man cub raised by a pack of wolves. But another bedtime reading to my daughter makes me discover that this book is made up of seven stories, and only three of them tell about Mowgli ("Mowgli's Brothers", "Kaa's Hunting" and "Tiger! Tiger!"). The search for a place to live safe from hunters is told in "The White Seal". "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" presents us with a nice domesticated mongoose. "Toomai of the Elephants" tells the story of a child with great talent. Finally, an unusual night meeting is told in "Her Majesty's Servants". And to the well-known characters of Bagheera, Baloo, Kaa, Shere Khan and Akela, are added Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Nag, Nagaina, Kotick, Sea Catch, Billy the mule and many others.Probably this is not a maserpiece, anyway Kipling produces an enjoyable read. "The Jungle Book", or the untamed beauty of wildlife.Vote: 7 Non sapevo che "Il Libro della Giungla" fosse una raccolta di racconti, grazie alla Disney lo avevo sempre identificato con la storia di Mowgli, il cucciolo di uomo che viene allevato da un branco di lupi. Invece l'ennesima lettura della buonanotte a mia figlia mi fa scoprire che questo libro è fatto da sette racconti, di cui solo tre narrano le vicende di Mowgli ("I Fratelli di Mowgli", "La Caccia di Kaa" e "Tigre! Tigre!"). La ricerca di un luogo in cui vivere al sicuro dai cacciatori è raccontata in "La Foca Bianca". "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" ci presenta una simpatica mangusta addomesticata. "Toomai degli Elefanti" racconta le vicende di un bambino con un grande talento. Infine un'insolita riunione notturna è raccontata in "I Servitori della Regina". Ed ai noti personaggi di Bagheera, Baloo, Kaa, Shere Khan e Akela, si aggiungono Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Nag, Nagaina, Kotick, Sea Catch, Billy il mulo e tanti altri.Probabilmente non un capolavoro, ma Kipling produce comunque una lettura piacevole. Il libro della giungla, ovvero la bellezza selvaggia degli animali.Voto: 7

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    We are the masters of our planet, but we are not very good masters. We are, in the blunt phrase I saw a zoologist use the other day, a plague species. Sometimes, one feels the world would be better off without human beings. This isn't necessarily a counsel of despair or treachery. Our true loyalty should be not to mankind but to our genes, and most of those genes are to be found in other species who are far less destructive. It would almost be a relief if the beautiful and savage animals we shar We are the masters of our planet, but we are not very good masters. We are, in the blunt phrase I saw a zoologist use the other day, a plague species. Sometimes, one feels the world would be better off without human beings. This isn't necessarily a counsel of despair or treachery. Our true loyalty should be not to mankind but to our genes, and most of those genes are to be found in other species who are far less destructive. It would almost be a relief if the beautiful and savage animals we share the world with could take it back from us and relieve us of this responsibility we are not equal to. Oddly enough, the author I know who is best at giving a voice to these feelings is Rudyard Kipling, in his short story Letting in the Jungle. The villagers have angered Mowgli and his friends. Now, the jungle folk return in force, led by Hathi the elephant and his three terrible sons. The ending and the concluding poem are unforgettable:The four pushed side by side; the outer wall bulged, split, and fell, and the villagers, dumb with horror, saw the savage, clay-streaked heads of the wreckers in the ragged gap. Then they fled, houseless and foodless, down the valley, as their village, shredded and tossed and trampled, melted behind them. A month later the place was a dimpled mound, covered with soft, green young stuff; and by the end of the Rains there was the roaring jungle in full blast on the spot that had been under plough not six months before. MOWGLI'S SONG AGAINST PEOPLE I will let loose against you the fleet-footed vines-- I will call in the Jungle to stamp out your lines! The roofs shall fade before it, The house-beams shall fall, And the Karela, the bitter Karela, Shall cover it all! In the gates of these your councils my people shall sing, In the doors of these your garners the Bat-folk shall cling; And the snake shall be your watchman, By a hearthstone unswept; For the Karela, the bitter Karela, Shall fruit where ye slept! Ye shall not see my strikers; ye shall hear them and guess; By night, before the moon-rise, I will send for my cess, And the wolf shall be your herdsman By a landmark removed, For the Karela, the bitter Karela, Shall seed where ye loved! I will reap your fields before you at the hands of a host; Ye shall glean behind my reapers, for the bread that is lost, And the deer shall be your oxen By a headland untilled, For the Karela, the bitter Karela, Shall leaf where ye build! I have untied against you the club-footed vines, I have sent in the Jungle to swamp out your lines. The trees--the trees are on you! The house-beams shall fall, And the Karela, the bitter Karela, Shall cover you all!__________________________________ Appalled by the dreadful things I was reading in Oreskes's and Conway's Merchants of Doubt, I suggested to a friend the other day that it might be interesting to start a political party called Exterminate Humanity. XH would have a simple agenda: using only legal means, it would support all initiatives which showed promise as possible ways to make human beings extinct. It would for example try to block funding of renewable energy, maximize production of greenhouse gasses, push for increased nuclear arsenals and discourage investment in SpaceGuard and other anti-meteorite defenses. My suggestion was meant ironically, so I was rather disquieted by my friend's reaction. She considered it for a moment, then nodded. "Yes," she said thoughtfully. "Sounds like quite a good idea." But maybe she just wanted to show that Australians could be more ironic than Europeans.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

    4.5/5 Kipling, Mowgli, and I have been on a long journey together. I started The Jungle Book nearly ten years ago. I lost my copy when I moved from the west coast to Chicago, found it again, picked up where I left off, lost it again when I moved to Wisconsin, and found it again in 2014. Since then, it's lingered on my nightstand waiting for me to join Mowgli again on his jungle adventures until last week. These stories are absolutely beautiful. It comes as no surprise that Kipling considered him 4.5/5 Kipling, Mowgli, and I have been on a long journey together. I started The Jungle Book nearly ten years ago. I lost my copy when I moved from the west coast to Chicago, found it again, picked up where I left off, lost it again when I moved to Wisconsin, and found it again in 2014. Since then, it's lingered on my nightstand waiting for me to join Mowgli again on his jungle adventures until last week. These stories are absolutely beautiful. It comes as no surprise that Kipling considered himself a poet first, for these stories are truly poetic. Kipling’s writing style is beautifully lyrical. His language flows with a whimsicalness. Reading these stories, I felt that Kipling appreciated the sound of language as much as its ability to convey a message. One thing I must clear up is the perception that this is a children’s book. Disney be damned, this is not a children’s book. It is ideal for young adults, but this is no children’s book. From the start, I felt I really lived this book. Mowgli and I ran through the jungle together with our fellow wolf cubs to listen to Akela at the Council Rock. Bagheera and Baloo became my mentors and Kaa my trusted friend. Kipling's magic was always rooted in the reality of common life. All over India there were tales of a child reared by a wolf pack. In the background to the stories, village life goes on with its lazy rhythms – buffalo wading through the shallows, women going to the well, and the man pack exploring the jungle. I loved the non-jungle stories as well: The White Seal -- Kotick, a rare white-furred northern fur seal, searches for a new home for his people, where they will not be hunted by humans. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi -- Rikki-Tikki the mongoose defends a human family living in India against a pair of cobras. Toomai of the Elephants -- Toomai, a ten-year-old boy who helps to tend working elephants, is told that he will never be a full-fledged elephant-handler until he has seen the elephants dance. The Miracle of Purun Bhagat -- An influential Indian politician abandons his worldly goods to become an ascetic holy man. Later, he must save a village from a landslide with the help of the local animals whom he has befriended. Quiquern -- A teenaged Inuit boy and girl set out across the arctic ice on a desperate hunt for food to save their tribe from starvation, guided by the mysterious animal-spirit Quiquern. However, Quiquern is not what he seems. The Jungle Books, yes, there are two, were my first journey with Kipling, but they will not be my last. I’m excited to venture back to India with Rudyard Kipling and Kim.

  4. 5 out of 5

    AMEERA

    my best childhood story absolutely the jungle book * mowgli * beautiful adventure

  5. 5 out of 5

    Apatt

    “Welcome to the jungle We've got fun 'n' games We got everything you want Honey, we know the names” The opening poem of The Jungle Book: “Now Rann the Kite brings home the night” etc. is much more elegant than Axl Rose’s effort, but I feel it would be much nicer for you to read it in the context of the book. Now if you are looking for a review from someone with an in-depth knowledge of Rudyard Kipling’s works you had better look elsewhere. My Kipling-fu is so feeble I did not even know The Jungle Boo “Welcome to the jungle We've got fun 'n' games We got everything you want Honey, we know the names” The opening poem of The Jungle Book: “Now Rann the Kite brings home the night” etc. is much more elegant than Axl Rose’s effort, but I feel it would be much nicer for you to read it in the context of the book. Now if you are looking for a review from someone with an in-depth knowledge of Rudyard Kipling’s works you had better look elsewhere. My Kipling-fu is so feeble I did not even know The Jungle Book was an anthology, not a novel about a badass little boy who blazed a trail for Tarzan. It didn’t even occur to me to read this book until I saw the trailer for the new 2015 movie a few days ago. I’m just going to run through the list of the stories then: 1. Mowgli's Brothers This surprised me, it’s basically the entire story of Mowgli as I know it from the movies (animated and live action). I wonder if Shere Khan is the inspiration for Chaka Khan? (cue eye rolls). If you only read one story from this book (what a silly notion) read this one. 2. Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack Nice poem, all the poems in this book are nice. 3. Kaa's Hunting This goes back up the timeline from the conclusion of “Mowgli's Brothers”, it features Mowgli being kidnaped by monkeys. At no point does Mowgli say “Take your stinking paws off me you damn dirty ape!”, Kipling was not into pop culture references (I am). Any way, Mowgli is chiefly aided by Kaa the python and his very particular set of skills. “Trust in me”. "but I didn't expect a Spanish Inquisition!" 4. Road-Song of the Bandar-Log Nice poem 5. “Tiger! Tiger!” Mowgli has a rematch with Shere Khan and finds human society not to his liking, the beds especially (I don’t blame him). 6. Mowgli's Song Great song, especially the guitar solo. 7. The White Seal Kotick the white seal is like the Columbus among seals. Very good story. Especially when Kotick decides he has had enough of the ignorant seals and their jibes then proceeds to hand their asses to them. They did not know he has been working out with some marathon swimming. 8. Lukannon “A sort of very sad seal National Anthem”. Thank you Literaturepage.com 9. “Rikki-Tikki-Tavi” Laugh at his silly name at your own peril Rikki-tikki-tavi is one badass mofo of a mongoose. I guess he could be the prototype for Ninja Turtles, K9*, Hong Kong Phooey and other superhero animals. 10. Darzee's Chant Darzee is a tailorbird from Rikki-tikki-tavi’s story with a penchant of breaking into songs at the most inappropriate moment. After Rikki-tikki-tavi is allowed to knock himself out with full blown hero worship through this song. 11. Toomai of the Elephants An Indian boy takes a clandestine ride on an elephant’s back and witnesses a huge herd of elephants performing “We Will Rock You”. “You got blood on yo' face You big disgrace Wavin' your trunk all over the place” 12. Shiv and the Grasshopper “The song that Toomai's mother sang to the baby” 13. Her Majesty's Servants Ah! Oh dear! For me this story is like throwing an eel at a marble wall, it just won’t stick. I listened** to it twice and I still can’t remember what it’s about. Somethihg to do with a bunch of animals nattering about something completely devoid of interest. 14. Parade Song of the Camp Animals Related to the previous story. No thanks. That’s it then, I enjoyed most of the stories, poems and song, except number 13 and 14 as mentioned above. Definitely recommended, especially the first story, which is a bear necessity. _____________________________________ * Hey Cecily, I managed to sneak one in! ** Librivox Audiobook, very nicely read/performed by Phil Chenevert. Thank you!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    IMO, Rudyard Kipling is the worst example of the quintessential British Imperialist and Colonialist. His attitude towards India is contemptuous and condescending. As a person, I dislike him intensely. Kipling writes beautifully. His stories are simple, engaging and profound at the same time. As a writer, I love him. This is a childhood favourite. I read it first in translation, and then in the original. This is a true classic - it works for one as a child as well as an adult.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynne King

    Two weeks ago I arrived at Aberdovey, a small seaside village on the Dyfi estuary in west Wales. So to discover sun, and thus an ideal day for the beach, I needed a book. Having no luck finding a bookshop, and minus my Kindle, the young man in the pub mentioned that the RNLI were selling books. So when I saw the smiling face of Mowgli on the cover of “The Jungle Book”, well I had to purchase it and also support the Lifeboats as they do such marvellous work. I had read this collection of short sto Two weeks ago I arrived at Aberdovey, a small seaside village on the Dyfi estuary in west Wales. So to discover sun, and thus an ideal day for the beach, I needed a book. Having no luck finding a bookshop, and minus my Kindle, the young man in the pub mentioned that the RNLI were selling books. So when I saw the smiling face of Mowgli on the cover of “The Jungle Book”, well I had to purchase it and also support the Lifeboats as they do such marvellous work. I had read this collection of short stories as a child but had forgotten the names and the animals and so what a delight it was to reread them. Who cannot possibly be excited and enthralled by the adventures of Mowgli (who was also known as Frog), a young abandoned man cub, who wanders into a wolf’s den in the Indian jungle? As this is fiction, he would, of course, not be eaten by its occupants but I was somewhat astonished by the child’s age and what he was able to do: “Directly in front of him (Father Wolf), holding on by a low branch, stood a naked brown baby who could just walk, as soft and as dimpled a little thing as ever came to a wolf’s cave at night. He looked up into Father Wolf’s face and laughed.” How could the wolves not possibly love him and welcome him into the pack? But still there were struggles for Mowgli from members of the pack; however, with the help of such staunch friends as Bagheera, the panther, and Baloo the bear, he managed to overcome them. When Mowgli is kidnapped by the Monkey People (the Bandar-log), Bagheera and Baloo enlist the help of a rather villainous Rock Python called Kaa as the monkies were terrified of him; I was too and could that snake move. Phew… What is sad though, despite the child learning all about the laws and languages of the jungle, Mowgli was never really accepted by the wolves (apart from his adopted parents), nor human beings either, when he was forced to leave the jungle and go and live and work in a local village. Sadly, he was betwixt and between. Also, did I miss something in that he remained naked all the time? That could have caused serious problems surely in the jungle, especially? Out of the other short stories, I definitely preferred “The White Seal” and Kotick the seal that at birth was white and caused great amazement to his parents: “Sea Catch,” Matkah said at last, “our baby’s going to be white!” “Empty clam-shells and dry seaweed!” snorted Sea Catch. “There never has been such a thing in the world as a white seal.” “I can’t help that,” said Matkah, “there’s going to be now”. And Kotick would indeed benefit from being white. What fun that was to read. I’m so pleased that I discovered this little gem of a book. Also to think that it was first published in 1894 and still gives immense pleasure to its readers, as can be seen by its place on Amazon’s best sellers’ list in the US.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aileene

    PRE - READ. ...as he believes I read too much Abs books *wrinkles nose* Commencing on the 8th of August (9 Aug - Aus time) >>>>>>>>>>>>>> POST-READ EDITED FOR Luke's review link. This is the second time I read The Jungle Book. The first one was when I was in secondary school as I had to write an essay for it. This story was memorable coz it was the same time when I first start wearing glasses. So, needless to say this was the very first story I read with PRE - READ. ...as he believes I read too much Abs books *wrinkles nose* Commencing on the 8th of August (9 Aug - Aus time) >>>>>>>>>>>>>> POST-READ EDITED FOR Luke's review link. This is the second time I read The Jungle Book. The first one was when I was in secondary school as I had to write an essay for it. This story was memorable coz it was the same time when I first start wearing glasses. So, needless to say this was the very first story I read with my pair. Back then though, you were considered/teased/called as a nerd when you wear spectacles. The bigger the frames, the bigger the lenses, the nerdER you are. So, you can just imagine my hesitations and disappointment when I've been told I needed a pair. Nowadays, every second person I see wears them. Glasses became a fashion statement. Glasses make a big fashion statement. So, back to the book. When Luke asked me to BR this classic, I said yes to it, of course. When I got my copy though, I had to double check the cover. The book was thickER than I expected. And then after reading "Mowgli's Brothers" I was surprised that there were more pages to turn. Huh? So then I realised that the book consists of more short stories and poems. Though, only three or four of them are actually stories about Mowgli, Baloo, Bagheera aka Baloogheera (as Luke cleverly put the two names together) and Shere Khan. Alrighty then, read more, I did. {Side comment: I think my teacher has provided the class a "photocopy" of Mowgli's Brother story only)I liked all of the stories and they all fit together okay as Kipling showcased animals.Animal fables to which the author explored themes such as courage, loyalty, friendship and love. But my favourite is "Riki-Tiki-Tavi". That mongoose was adorable and his loyalty & love for the family who took him in were boundless and admirable. Love lovelovelovelove this character. I'm not gonna go into details as I'm sure everyone has read this. *grumbles* am I the only one here who was surprised that it's a collection of poems and songs?!But what I'll do in this review of MOWGLI's STORY (only) is to compare what I read and what I watched.The Book.The writings was old and there were parts that made me either bored or had to stop and absorb what Kipling was trying to say.Baloo was very wise, teaching Mowgli almost everything. He was very strict and always ready to strike a blow on young Mowgli when he doesn't pay attention or get anything wrong.“Better he should be bruised from head to foot by me who loves him than that he should come to harm through ignorance,” Baloo answered very earnestly.” Bagheera, who is another companion of Mowgli and a wise one too.I forgot about his story. His secret bald spot and that mark. The collar mark that no one knew. “And yet, Little Brother, I was born among men.Fed behind bars from an iron pan till one night I felt that I was Bagheera—the Panther—and no man’s plaything, and I broke the silly lock with one blow of my paw and came away.” And Kaa. Interestingly enough as I couldn't remember, as almost everything in this book, that he was an ally too who helped Mowgli to escape from those rambunctious monkeys. The difference.These 3 main characters were nowhere near anything like this in the film. They were fun and very entertaining. Never felt that I was watching an adaptation of a classic story. Disney film had changed the plot enormously. And even added a new character.One other thing I noticed though, was that Mowgli didn't have a female influence on his side. Sure he had mother wolf but she had a very short role and did nothing really heroic.It makes me think that perhaps, this was the reason why Kaa, the python was voiced by a female actress in the new film to balance the gender equation that influenced young Mowgli. Could it be? The other difference. Over the years, I managed to collect 4 pairs of glasses (2 of em are useless; prescription-wise) and have earnt myself another pair recently.Also, reading it this time around is not because of school requirement but just for the sake of reading and enjoying it as it should be.And what makes it a spectacular read too is I BR it with a very good friend.Now, I will edit this review when Luke had finished and posted his review.His review link will be added as I'm sure his thoughts will be thorough.After all there's a reason why he is the writer and I, I use that other pair of glasses I just acquired. Rating it 3.5 Baloogheera-for-the-win Stars flag 37 likes · Like  · see review View all 56 comments May 31, 2009 Kristen rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Shelves: 1001-books-before-you-die, action-adventure, childrens, classics, short-story No this is not your Disney movie - Kipling wrote a fantastic series of short stories, only a few of which include Mowgli. Baloo is not a lazy idiot, Kaa is not a bad guy, SherKahn is killed rather then run off, the wolves are not always the noble good guys... this is VERY different then our cotton candy Disney film. And so much more enjoyable for it.Also included are the tales of Rikki Tikki Tavi, the Elephant Dance, and the White Seal. I would have to say that my favorite is Rikki Tikki Tavi, h No this is not your Disney movie - Kipling wrote a fantastic series of short stories, only a few of which include Mowgli. Baloo is not a lazy idiot, Kaa is not a bad guy, SherKahn is killed rather then run off, the wolves are not always the noble good guys... this is VERY different then our cotton candy Disney film. And so much more enjoyable for it.Also included are the tales of Rikki Tikki Tavi, the Elephant Dance, and the White Seal. I would have to say that my favorite is Rikki Tikki Tavi, he's just so loveable and wonderful. There is a sense of magic in Kiplings animals, every reader will find themselves dreaming of being raised by wolves and taught the law of the jungle by Baloo.I know that this was written as a children's book - but I have a hard time believing that my 11 year old son would be able to read and enjoy it, the beauty of the language will be lost on many of the younger readers who are used to the forward speaking newer YA books. But I would assume that by middle school they should be able to fully enjoy it. flag 36 likes · Like  · see review View all 8 comments Jul 02, 2017 Anne Goldschrift rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Ich bin so froh, es gelesen zu haben. Ich hätte niemals erwartet, dass sich Disney und Original SO fundamental unterscheiden :D flag 31 likes · Like  · see review View 1 comment Aug 11, 2018 Shirley Revill rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Shelves: classic, fiction, children I read this book when I was a child and I really enjoyed the stories at the time. This book was also a favourite with my children. Wonderful classic stories. Pure nostalgia. flag 30 likes · Like  · see review Oct 07, 2017 Leo . rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition A story that is really an institution. The characters mirrored in the Cub Scout Movement. I was a cub when I was a child and I adored the concept. Akela our leader and Bagheera. I remember going camping and foraging and singing songs around the fire. The nostalgia is warming.An amazing five stars. I love this story. Brilliantly written by one of the greats.🐯👍 flag 28 likes · Like  · see review View 1 comment Jul 04, 2016 Mariah rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition I am trying to read more classics, so why not start off with the Jungle book? This book is short enough that it only takes two CDs to listen to and a new movie version just came out about this book.The characters were interesting and very different from the movie. For example, Baloo was apart of the wolf pack the whole time. His job is to train the pups. This is completely different than the movie. All in all, I enjoyed this read! I’m glad this is my first classic, after starting up again. Also, I am trying to read more classics, so why not start off with the Jungle book? This book is short enough that it only takes two CDs to listen to and a new movie version just came out about this book.The characters were interesting and very different from the movie. For example, Baloo was apart of the wolf pack the whole time. His job is to train the pups. This is completely different than the movie. All in all, I enjoyed this read! I’m glad this is my first classic, after starting up again. Also, I read this book for the EVERYONE Has Read This but Me - The Catch-Up Book Club.P.s. I read this for my J read for the A-Z Book Title Challenge. flag 27 likes · Like  · see review View all 9 comments Dec 18, 2016 Michael Finocchiaro rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: favorites, kids, fiction, english-19th-c The stories of Mowgli and his friends are splendid. Yes, Kipling was an unabashed supporter of colonialism and orientalist, he nonetheless was able to create some of the most vivid stories of animals and children and this one is certainly the best. The Disney movie does not come close to doing it justice. A must read even as an adult. flag 26 likes · Like  · see review Aug 06, 2010 Amber Tucker rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: hardcore children's lit fans Shelves: disappointments, why-is-this-classic-again Lesson learned from this book: having been much- and long-beloved does not automatically make a book worth reading. The only particular reason I picked this one off my shelf was the feeling it's a "classic" of children's lit, which I felt slightly ashamed of never having had a chance to enjoy – I assumed must be classically marvellous. (I mean, I don't know if I ever even watched the Disney adaptation all the way through. I was actually expecting all Mowgli stories. More than half are not, act Lesson learned from this book: having been much- and long-beloved does not automatically make a book worth reading. The only particular reason I picked this one off my shelf was the feeling it's a "classic" of children's lit, which I felt slightly ashamed of never having had a chance to enjoy – I assumed must be classically marvellous. (I mean, I don't know if I ever even watched the Disney adaptation all the way through. I was actually expecting all Mowgli stories. More than half are not, actually, about Mowgli in any way.) What I was sorry to find, however, is that these stories are just classically bad. In its own way, this is frankly one of the weirdest books I've ever read. Even its age doesn't pardon it, in my opinion. One of my first thoughts, rather unaccountably it may seem, was "This reads like the Bible." This isn't wholly a negative thing. For example, I recognize and appreciate the often-poetic language used in the Bible, and I can do the same here. The little songs and poems between the chapters are metrically perfect (this counts for a lot, with me) and if not beautiful, are nicely-formed; in form and language, they always evoke the characters he's created for the animals. Here are a couple verses of the Song of the Bander-log [monkeys:]: Here we sit in a branchy row,Thinking of beautiful things we know. Dreaming of deeds that we mean to do, All complete, in a minute or two-Something noble and wise and good, Done by merely wishing we could.We've forgotten, but- never mind, Brother, thy tail hangs down behind! All the talk we ever have heard,Uttered by bat or beast or bird-Hide or fin or scale or feather -Jabber it quickly and all together! Excellent! Wonderful! One again!Now we are talking just like men!Let's pretend we are – never mind, Brother, thy tail hangs down behind! This is the way of the monkey-kind. See? It's cute... the charm fades, though, with re-reading. Now for what I really dislike. Two words: imperialism and anthropocentrism. Actually, anthropomorphism as well, but that can hardly be avoided, to a degree, so I'll let it go. The 'best' of the various animal characters speak like noble British subjects (of about the sixteenth century, no less – people in Kipling's day didn't even talk like this – "thee-thy-thou, overformality considering we live in a jungle" etc, it's maddening), they have their own strict Jungle Law, and they call themselves people. Could it be any more obvious that these animals are meant to represent humans? Furthermore, that the non-humanlike animals are fated by nature to kowtow to the more 'civilized' species? Too obviously allegorical = another commonality with parts of the Bible. This kind of attitude may be common enough in folktales and mythology, but doesn't excuse the gross colonial bias with which the whole jungle universe, both inhabitants and organizing principles, are presented.The animals respect, virtually worship, the humans. Though nearly all the characters are animals, everything about the stories centers around humanity, that is the glorious courage, order and reason of the British empire. If that's supposed to be modern folktale, it's akin to religious brainwashing. Not in the stories it tells, but in the value judgements implicit within these stories. And by the way, also like the Bible, I had to hate many of Kipling's 'heroes.' Little Toomai is a sneak and a traitor; I almost cried at the treatment of the elephants truthfully and matter-of-factly depicted in his chapter. Elsewhere: Rikki-Tikki made me want to stamp on a member of the family Herpestidae, pronto. I was rooting for the cobras. To conclude, if you're willing to accept a whack of disgustingly antiquated values threaded into not-especially-imaginative stories, you can enjoy The Jungle Book. I'm sorry that I couldn't find more to like in it. But it's safe to say, for once, that Walt Disney's job is probably better (at the very least, less offensive)! flag 24 likes · Like  · see review View all 24 comments Dec 07, 2012 Terry rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: fantasy, audio-books, ya-children-s, short-stories Rudyard Kipling’s _The Jungle Book_ is an enjoyable read. A collection of short stories, all of which revolve around the lives and troubles of different animals and the people who interact with them, it has a surprising amount of depth coupled with rather pleasant prose. The most famous of these stories are probably those that revolve around Mowgli, the jungle boy raised by wolves in India whose adventures with Baloo the bear and Bagheera the panther against the machinations of Shere Khan the ti Rudyard Kipling’s _The Jungle Book_ is an enjoyable read. A collection of short stories, all of which revolve around the lives and troubles of different animals and the people who interact with them, it has a surprising amount of depth coupled with rather pleasant prose. The most famous of these stories are probably those that revolve around Mowgli, the jungle boy raised by wolves in India whose adventures with Baloo the bear and Bagheera the panther against the machinations of Shere Khan the tiger are fairly well-known (even resulting in a typically watered-down Disney movie from many years ago).All of the stories are notable for their fairly even handed treatment of the interactions between animals and men. The tragedy and pathos of the tribulations and abuse animals often have to suffer at the hands of man are not glossed over, but neither is it implied that all interactions between mankind and the animal kingdom are destructive or unwarranted. The animals are presented as having languages and customs of their own and Kipling generally does a pretty neat trick of managing to straddle the line between having his animal characters behave too much like humans and having them fall into unrelatability by being purely ‘animals’. The most significant contravention of this occurs, I think, in the story “Her Majesty’s Servants” in which, in my opinion, a group of animals serving various roles in a British regiment shade a bit more towards taking on the roles of their all-too human handlers. That quibble aside I enjoyed these morality fables and adventure stories, with those centring on Mowgli and his lessons in the Laws of the Jungle topping the list. Good clean fun with enough meat to the bone to give you something to think about. flag 25 likes · Like  · see review Mar 05, 2017 Celeste rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: classics-i-ve-read, childrens-books Full review posted below.This was my first book completed on the Serial Reader app, an awesome way to read classic works of literature in less than fifteen minutes a day. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in reading some classics, but who doesn’t want to get bogged down in them. And no, I haven’t been asked to advertise the app; I just really think it was a fantastic idea, and the execution of that idea was incredibly well done.End advertisement. ;) Onto the story at hand.Most ev Full review posted below.This was my first book completed on the Serial Reader app, an awesome way to read classic works of literature in less than fifteen minutes a day. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in reading some classics, but who doesn’t want to get bogged down in them. And no, I haven’t been asked to advertise the app; I just really think it was a fantastic idea, and the execution of that idea was incredibly well done.End advertisement. ;) Onto the story at hand.Most everyone probably knows at least a little about this book, due in large part to Disney’s animated movie and their more recent live-action film. I enjoyed reading about Mowgli and his adventures growing up as the lone man-cub in the jungle. Bagheera the Panther, Baloo the Bear, and Kaa the Python all had different personalities than their film counterparts, but were just as much fun to read as they are to watch. Mowgli was headstrong and clever and never backed down from a challenge. Raised by a Wolfpack against the wishes of Shere Khan, the man-eating Tiger, Mowgli lived an interesting life to say the least. He learned every language present in the jungle, and then spent some time in a human village and learned to speak as they speak. But the village could not hold him. He conquered his foes and returned to the jungle, triumphant.Besides the main story of Mowgli, Kipling also included the stories of Kotick, the White Seal; Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, the Mongoose; Toomai, the Elephant boy; and different animals in the military, who argue about whose method of fighting is right. Of these, Rikki-Tikki-Tavi’s story was by far the best. I completely understand why his is the segment included in so many literature books, because it was the most engaging story in the entirety of the Jungle Book, in my opinion. I enjoyed the adventures of the little mongoose even more than I did the tales of Mowgli the man-cub. Second-best out of these secondary tales was the story of Kotick, the White Seal. I was thrown by his story at first, because it was the first after Mowlgi’s story, but once I adjusted to the change I enjoyed the little white seal, out to save his people from being butchered. He swam to the beat of his own drum, and I can always respect that. The last two stories weren’t enjoyable to me. They’re where I bogged down and just had to make myself power through to the end. I found Toomai annoying, and I could care less about which animal thought they were the most important in a battle. If the book had ended after the tale of Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, I would’ve easily given it 4 stars. But, because of the drudgery of the last two stories, I’m settling at a 3 here. It was a short, mostly fun classic to mark off of my “to-read” list, and I enjoyed marking it off in the 24 episodes that Serial Reader provided. The novelty of the app added to my enjoyment, and I will most definitely be reading more classics this way!For more of reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings flag 23 likes · Like  · see review View all 8 comments Jul 22, 2017 Archit Ojha rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition Neil Gaiman revealed in his books that it was Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book that he read over and over again. The Jungle Book is one of the fabulous books in my list. Reading the book brought me a nostalgic feeling about my childhood when I used to watch its tv series. Those days were truly Golden. They are just a memory now, but thanks to this book that I can go back in time, whenever I wish and relive those moments. flag 23 likes · Like  · see review Jul 23, 2017 Andrei Tamaş rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition Deşi Prima carte a junglei nu mă atinsese aproape deloc, părându-mi-se mai degrabă o încercare eşuată de a scrie o carte pentru copii (deoarece incoerenţa firului narativ, puzzle-ul epic, depăşeşte cu mult mintea unui inocent), A doua carte a junglei este o adevărată panoramă (nevinovată, e drept, dar tocmai caracterul acesta feciorelnic îi da toată supleţea). Mi-a plăcut mult partea în care s-au întrepătruns cele două zone climatice - povestioara de la Pol şi pădurile tropicale ale Indiei. Cu t Deşi Prima carte a junglei nu mă atinsese aproape deloc, părându-mi-se mai degrabă o încercare eşuată de a scrie o carte pentru copii (deoarece incoerenţa firului narativ, puzzle-ul epic, depăşeşte cu mult mintea unui inocent), A doua carte a junglei este o adevărată panoramă (nevinovată, e drept, dar tocmai caracterul acesta feciorelnic îi da toată supleţea). Mi-a plăcut mult partea în care s-au întrepătruns cele două zone climatice - povestioara de la Pol şi pădurile tropicale ale Indiei. Cu toată mişcarea vertiginoasă ce caracterizează romanul, acesta ajunge, în fine, sub aura melancoliei, deoarece omul se întoarce tot la om. Iar asta ca o lege nescrisă a junglei. Mi-a plăcut foarte mult, ba chiar am şi râs la o remarcă scoasă parcă din context a autorului, remarcă inserată în ultimul capitol: "Mowgli se simţi fericit că era atât de trist, dacă puteţi înţelege acest tip sucit de fericire." Nici Cioran nu ar fi spus-o mai bine. flag 16 likes · Like  · see review Nov 03, 2016 Sinem A. rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition Çocukken filmini izleyip hayran oldum. sonra da bu hayranlığımı hiç kaybetmedim. ancak kitabı çok aradım. çocuk kitabı olarak vardı ama büyükler için versiyonu bulunmuyordu. sadece bu boşluğu doldurduğu için bile İthaki yi tebrik etmeliyim. bu baskıda sadece orman kitabı değil başka öyküler de var ; sizi hayvanlar aleminde farklı maceralara sürükleyen... flag 16 likes · Like  · see review Sep 18, 2017 Melanti rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: anthology, audiobook, e-book, classics, children, group-reads, 2017 I had no idea this was an anthology. For some reason, I thought it was going to be only about Mowgli and his jungle friends, and had no idea this is where Riki Tiki Tavi came from.This was cute, but there were a couple of stories that just didn't seem to fit the "Jungle" theme. The one about the seal in particular had no business being in the collection. But the one about the camp animals and how they contributed to war/fighting also seemed a bit out of place too. Not that these weren't good sto I had no idea this was an anthology. For some reason, I thought it was going to be only about Mowgli and his jungle friends, and had no idea this is where Riki Tiki Tavi came from.This was cute, but there were a couple of stories that just didn't seem to fit the "Jungle" theme. The one about the seal in particular had no business being in the collection. But the one about the camp animals and how they contributed to war/fighting also seemed a bit out of place too. Not that these weren't good stories; they just didn't mesh well with the others. flag 13 likes · Like  · see review Aug 05, 2018 Kristen rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition Shelves: classics, middlegrade, dnf Real life footage of me reading this book: flag 12 likes · Like  · see review Jul 10, 2016 aPriL does feral sometimes rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: adventure, children, fantasy, favorites, short-stories "Now Chil the Kite brings home the nightThat Mang the Bat sets free--The herds are shut in byre and hut,For loosed till dawn are we.This is the hour of pride and power,Talon and tush and claw.Oh, hear the call! - Good hunting allThat keep the Jungle Law!"Night-song in the jungle'The Jungle Book' by Rudyard Kipling is a book of delightful short stories and poem-songs about talking animals. Five of the stories follow Mowgli, who as a human toddler was separated from his parents after Shere Khan, t "Now Chil the Kite brings home the nightThat Mang the Bat sets free--The herds are shut in byre and hut,For loosed till dawn are we.This is the hour of pride and power,Talon and tush and claw.Oh, hear the call! - Good hunting allThat keep the Jungle Law!"Night-song in the jungle'The Jungle Book' by Rudyard Kipling is a book of delightful short stories and poem-songs about talking animals. Five of the stories follow Mowgli, who as a human toddler was separated from his parents after Shere Khan, the tiger, tried to attack the family in the jungles of India. Instead of ending up as a meal for Shere Khan, Mowgli is raised eventually by two wolves who see him as one of their cubs. But first, a meeting was called and the ethics of adopting a manchild were debated by the pack. The matter is settled when Baloo, the bear, agrees to accept Mowgli as a student to teach him the Law of the Jungle; and Bagheera, the black panther, agrees to take the pack to a newly killed bull in exchange for Mowgli's acceptance into the pack. The wolf pack take the deal, but Shere Khan becomes Mowgli's mortal enemy.Mowgli has a number of adventures which are not all entirely pleasant, but I have this strong feeling it was on the whole fun to be a feral child!Other talking animal stories are included which showcase a variety of wild and domesticated animals who find Mankind and Nature directs them towards certain choices and troubles. Their personalities and inclinations direct their fates somewhat, but, gentle reader, I found them all to be wonderful creatures. However, I admit to favoring Rikki Tikki Tavi, the mongoose, most of all!Mature children will adore this book, especially if they are able to get an edition with illustrations, but if you are familiar with the Disney movie version only, I must emphasize the unabridged book version has animal deaths, by hunting. flag 12 likes · Like  · see review Feb 13, 2008 Werner rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Recommends it for: Fans of stories about animals and/or jungle adventure Shelves: classics Lost in the jungles of 19th-century India (the book was first published in 1894) as a toddler, little Mowgli is rescued from the vicious tiger Shere Khan by an adoptive family of wolves, who raise him as part of their pack. The author's various species of jungle animals exhibit many traits and behaviors characteristic of real ones (Kipling was born and raised in India, and his setting is depicted with a deftness born of first-hand observation); but he also endows them with a culture and language Lost in the jungles of 19th-century India (the book was first published in 1894) as a toddler, little Mowgli is rescued from the vicious tiger Shere Khan by an adoptive family of wolves, who raise him as part of their pack. The author's various species of jungle animals exhibit many traits and behaviors characteristic of real ones (Kipling was born and raised in India, and his setting is depicted with a deftness born of first-hand observation); but he also endows them with a culture and languages, and a concept of Jungle Law, which allows him to use many of them as models of unspoiled "masculine" virtues, and to compare their world with civilized human society to the disadvantage of the latter. (His anthropomorphic treatment of animals, and his use of it for subtle social commentary, could be compared to Richard Adams' similar technique in Watership Down.)Though the book was written for children and is traditionally marketed for them, I think modern children would be put off by the old-fashioned diction (Mowgli and the animals talk in a style which was actually archaic even in the 19th century), and probably wouldn't appreciate the setting and messages as much as an adult would. An adult who could accept the improbable premise on its own terms, though, could find much to enjoy here. (I recall that I enjoyed it as a child --but my reading tastes were somewhat precocious and atypical.) flag 12 likes · Like  · see review View all 3 comments Jun 12, 2018 Alba Turunen rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: 2018, juvenil, relatos-cortos, reto-libros-libros-y-más-libros-201, siglo-xix, clásicos 3 Estrellas para este libro bastante especial. En realidad "El libro de la Selva" es un conjunto de relatos cortos recopilados en un tomo, donde los protagonistas son los animales. El libro entraña una serie de enseñanzas morales, que pone en comunión al hombre con la naturaleza; sólo por esto, y siendo un libro de más de cien años, creo que merece la pena leerse.Comencé este libro como parte de un reto, pues debía leer a un autor que hubiese ganado un premio Nobel de literatura, y me pareció in 3 Estrellas para este libro bastante especial. En realidad "El libro de la Selva" es un conjunto de relatos cortos recopilados en un tomo, donde los protagonistas son los animales. El libro entraña una serie de enseñanzas morales, que pone en comunión al hombre con la naturaleza; sólo por esto, y siendo un libro de más de cien años, creo que merece la pena leerse.Comencé este libro como parte de un reto, pues debía leer a un autor que hubiese ganado un premio Nobel de literatura, y me pareció interesante descubrir que Rudyard Kipling había sido uno de ellos.Como digo, el ejemplar que he leído es una recopilación de siete relatos cortos; los tres primeros los destinados al niño Mowgli, criado por los lobos, y adiestrado por Bagheera y Baloo. Estos tres relatos cortos son en los que se basó Disney para su mítica película. El resto de relatos, son también del estilo, y protagonizados por animales, como una mangosta, unos caballos y unos elefantes, la mayoría ocurren en la India, salvo uno de ellos, protagonizado por una foca, que ocurre en el Polo Norte y distintos lugares oceánicos.Así que como conclusión, me ha parecido un libro anecdótico y bonito, y el hecho de que sean relatos cortos ha hecho que no se me haga pesada su lectura. flag 12 likes · Like  · see review Nov 04, 2013 GoldGato rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Shelves: children, literature, illustration, summer This classic story by Rudyard Kipling, telling of the adventures of Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the jungles of India, gets the Ingpen treatment. That is, the illustrations are by Australian artist Robert Ingpen, who brings the animals to life in the best edition I have seen of Kipling's tales for children. This is the hour of pride and power,Talon and tush and claw.Kipling. His pen could write with a silver tongue. The sounds and denizens of the jungle come alive with his words. Now add th This classic story by Rudyard Kipling, telling of the adventures of Mowgli who is raised by wolves in the jungles of India, gets the Ingpen treatment. That is, the illustrations are by Australian artist Robert Ingpen, who brings the animals to life in the best edition I have seen of Kipling's tales for children. This is the hour of pride and power,Talon and tush and claw.Kipling. His pen could write with a silver tongue. The sounds and denizens of the jungle come alive with his words. Now add these incredible pictures of Bagheera the Panther, Baloo the Bear, and the Monkey-Folk...known as the Bandar-Log.Here we sit in branchy row,Thinking of beautiful things we know;Dreaming of deeds that we mean to do,All complete, in a minute or two -Something noble and grand and good,Won by merely wishing we could.And Kaa the Python! A snake of 30 feet length who could knock down a large-sized man. Ingpen does him justice (this isn't Disney). Additionally, this volume contains the story of THE WHITE SEAL, who strives to find an island where man has not tread. TOOMAI OF THE ELEPHANTS and HER MAJESTY'S SERVANTS round out the collection. And, of course, RIKKI-TIKKI-TAVI, the little mongoose who took on Nag the Cobra. This is a magnificent book. Full parchment paper, heavy dust jacket, illustrations galore, green satin bookmark. Worth every cent.Book Season = Summer (steam rising from the ground) flag 11 likes · Like  · see review Aug 31, 2017 Donna rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: classic This is a classic by Rudyard Kipling. It's a collection of short stories for children with lots of animals and humans, and how they did and did not get along. Even though there was a fair amount of death in these stories, it was kind of glossy as most children's books are. The Disney version of Mowgli's story is definitely cleaned up a bit. I never read this one to my kids when they were little. Even though I liked this, I don't regret not having read this one to them. flag 11 likes · Like  · see review Apr 25, 2014 Olga Godim rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition Shelves: classics Last time I read The Jungle Book was years ago, to my son, when he was a preschooler. I didn’t remember much before I started this read. It might be that I only read him selective stories, because my memory of the stories was sketchy. Mowgli – aye, all of them, even the ones included in the other Jungle book. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi – yes, of course. But I don’t remember ever reading The White Seal or a couple other stories, so my impression of them is fresh. The entire book is simplistic on the surfac Last time I read The Jungle Book was years ago, to my son, when he was a preschooler. I didn’t remember much before I started this read. It might be that I only read him selective stories, because my memory of the stories was sketchy. Mowgli – aye, all of them, even the ones included in the other Jungle book. Rikki-Tikki-Tavi – yes, of course. But I don’t remember ever reading The White Seal or a couple other stories, so my impression of them is fresh. The entire book is simplistic on the surface: children stories mostly set in India, where animals assume human characteristics. Anthropomorphism is not a new literary device. It was first employed by Aesop, but Kipling wields it with skills unsurpassed by any writer who came after him. His stories are philosophical and many-layered – a layer for any age or point of view. Many stories, despite their artless beauty, are focused on a conflict between a person and a society. Mowgli searches for his true identity but doesn’t find it. He belongs to two tribes – the jungle and the humans – but is fully accepted by neither. The white seal Kotick in his eponymous, Russian-flavored tale searches for a better, safer home for his people, but even when he finds it, he has to fight his conservative-thinking kin, to force them to change. Like Mowgli, Kotick doesn’t belong among his peers. He is a loner and a leader. The children see him as a noble hero, but I must ask: is Koitick a hero or a dictator? Is there a difference? Was it a coincidence that the story is infused with Russian influence? In my opinion, this story is the most profound in the collection. Incidentally, it’s the only one set outside of India. The elephant story is a story of exploitation. English exploit Indians. People exploit elephants. Nobody feels even a tad sorry, and everyone feels entitled. Although the esthetics and the metaphors are fantastic, the morals are…questionable. The last story, Her Majesty's Servants, is the most ‘imperialistic’ of all and surprisingly stark for a children story. It lists all the ways an animal could fight for the British army – with pride! It spoiled the taste of the entire book for me. I don’t think this story belongs in this collection. Or maybe it does, which makes me even sadder. The only undisputed hero in the book was Rikki, the mongoose. His goal is to keep his adapted family safe, and he risks his life to achieve that goal. His story is light-hearted, very optimistic, and his bravery is as simple as his goal. His mental process caused me to smile. It is the hardest thing in the world to frighten a mongoose, because he is eaten up from nose to tail with curiosity. The political views of the author are on display in this book, perhaps unintentionally, and while I disagree with them, I have to admit that all the stories were written by a master of the craft. I happened to read this book right after some mediocre indie novel, and the comparison – oh, boy! Like a pebble and a diamond. I luxuriated in the clean, sparkling water of Kipling’s language. It flowed and washed away the sticky residue left by bad writing. Most historical writers I’ve ever read tend to rhapsodize, but not Kipling. He was trained and worked as a journalist, and it shows. Not an extraneous word in the entire book. What’s even more interesting: Kipling’s expressive, almost ‘visual’ narration was accomplished with very few adjectives. The book could serve as a writing teacher’s example of what could be achieved with verbs and nouns. Sarcasm is another instrument in Kipling’s arsenal. The writer is sensitivity to human follies. He doesn’t condemn openly but he mocks mercifully. In the Mowgli’s stories, the comparison of monkeys and humans is uncanny and spot on. No sooner had he walked to the city wall than the monkeys pulled him back, telling him that he didn’t know how happy he was, and pinching him to make him grateful.… ‘We are great. We are free. We are wonderful. We are the most wonderful people in all the Jungle! We all say so, and so it must be true,’ they shouted. [underlining – mine] Recognizing anyone, my friends? Maybe Kipling was not as ‘imperialist’ as his critics say. Or maybe his honesty overrode his political convictions. It happens with great writers. A mandatory read for everyone. flag 10 likes · Like  · see review Apr 13, 2009 PurplyCookie rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition Shelves: childrens-books, classics Kipling pours fuel on childhood fantasies with his tales of Mowgli, lost in the jungles of India as a child and adopted into a family of wolves. Mowgli is brought up on a diet of Jungle Law, loyalty, and fresh meat from the kill. "The boy could climb almost as well as he could swim, and swim almost as well as he could run; so Baloo, the Teacher of the Law, taught him the Wood and Water Laws. Then, too, Mowgli was taught the Stranger's Hunting Call, which must be repeated aloud till it is answere Kipling pours fuel on childhood fantasies with his tales of Mowgli, lost in the jungles of India as a child and adopted into a family of wolves. Mowgli is brought up on a diet of Jungle Law, loyalty, and fresh meat from the kill. "The boy could climb almost as well as he could swim, and swim almost as well as he could run; so Baloo, the Teacher of the Law, taught him the Wood and Water Laws. Then, too, Mowgli was taught the Stranger's Hunting Call, which must be repeated aloud till it is answered, whenever one of the Jungle-People hunts outside his own grounds. It means, translated: 'Give me leave to hunt here because I'm hungry'; and the answer is: 'Hunt then for food, but not for pleasure.'" Regular adventures with his friends and enemies among the Jungle-People --cobras, panthers, bears, and tigers -- hone this man-cub's strength and cleverness and whet every reader's imagination. More importantly, Mowgli learns the value of 'good manners' early on, learns that 'all play and no work' leads to unexpected troubles, learns that thoughtless actions can have devasting consequences. By showing Mowgli in an often dangerous 'all animal' world, we see reflections of modern human problems presented in a more subtle light. Kipling leads children down the jungle path into adventures beyond their day to day imagining and along the way, he weaves subtle points in and out of the stories, he shows the value of 'doing for yourself', of 'learning who to trust'. Included are other jungle stories not directly connected to the character of Mowgli. Baloo is a lovable bear who teaches Mowgli the ways of the jungle and how to respect it. Bagheera is a feared and wise black panther who befriends Mowgli in all situations. In "Kaa's Hunting", Mowgli is kidnapped by the Bandar-log monkeys. Monkeys are not highly respected in the jungle community because they have no leader. Baloo and Bagheera seek the help of Kaa the Python to rescue Mowgli. The stories "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" and "The White Seal" have nothing to do with Mowgli and his adventures, but they offer valuable lessons. The lesson in "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" is to trust yourself and the loyalty in friends. In "Toomai of the Elephants", a young boy falls asleep on his elephant. The elephants then march off to a hill far away. Here the boy wakes up to find thousands of elephants all stomping in the same pattern, at the same time. The boy has then seen the dance of the elephants.Book Details: Title The Jungle Book (Puffin Classics)Author Rudyard Kipling Reviewed By Purplycookie flag 10 likes · Like  · see review View all 9 comments Mar 23, 2016 K.M. Weiland rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition This is not Disney's Jungle Book--and that's a good thing. As much as I love the classic Disney cartoon version, this is a delightful story in its original incarnation, featuring a much grittier jungle and a much more independent young Mowgli. Aside from the Mowgli stories, there are also several other charmers, including my childhood favorite "Riki-Tiki-Tavi" and the ending story about the army animals. This is Kipling at his rightful best. flag 9 likes · Like  · see review « previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 … next »

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