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Wie ich die Dinge geregelt kriege: Selbstmanagement für den Alltag. Überarbeitete Neuausgabe 2015

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Eigentlich sollte man längst bei einem Termin sein, doch dann klingelt das Handy und das E-Mail-Postfach quillt auch schon wieder über. Für Sport und Erholung bleibt immer weniger Zeit und am Ende resigniert man ausgebrannt, unproduktiv und völlig gestresst. Doch das muss nicht sein. Denn je entspannter wir sind, desto kreativer und produktiver werden wir. Mit David Allens Eigentlich sollte man längst bei einem Termin sein, doch dann klingelt das Handy und das E-Mail-Postfach quillt auch schon wieder über. Für Sport und Erholung bleibt immer weniger Zeit und am Ende resigniert man ausgebrannt, unproduktiv und völlig gestresst. Doch das muss nicht sein. Denn je entspannter wir sind, desto kreativer und produktiver werden wir. Mit David Allens einfacher und anwendungsorientierter Methode wird beides wieder möglich: effizient zu arbeiten und die Freude am Leben zurückzugewinnen.


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Eigentlich sollte man längst bei einem Termin sein, doch dann klingelt das Handy und das E-Mail-Postfach quillt auch schon wieder über. Für Sport und Erholung bleibt immer weniger Zeit und am Ende resigniert man ausgebrannt, unproduktiv und völlig gestresst. Doch das muss nicht sein. Denn je entspannter wir sind, desto kreativer und produktiver werden wir. Mit David Allens Eigentlich sollte man längst bei einem Termin sein, doch dann klingelt das Handy und das E-Mail-Postfach quillt auch schon wieder über. Für Sport und Erholung bleibt immer weniger Zeit und am Ende resigniert man ausgebrannt, unproduktiv und völlig gestresst. Doch das muss nicht sein. Denn je entspannter wir sind, desto kreativer und produktiver werden wir. Mit David Allens einfacher und anwendungsorientierter Methode wird beides wieder möglich: effizient zu arbeiten und die Freude am Leben zurückzugewinnen.

30 review for Wie ich die Dinge geregelt kriege: Selbstmanagement für den Alltag. Überarbeitete Neuausgabe 2015

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    I like reading about organizing my life and being more productive, but I think the major lessons of this book could have been condensed in a page or two. Here are the things I remember: - 2 minute rule: if you remember to do something and it takes you less than two minutes to do it, just go ahead and do it - write things down in lists so that they don't float around your head and nag at you all of the time - check your lists frequently and often, actually doing the things on the list (or delegating I like reading about organizing my life and being more productive, but I think the major lessons of this book could have been condensed in a page or two. Here are the things I remember: - 2 minute rule: if you remember to do something and it takes you less than two minutes to do it, just go ahead and do it - write things down in lists so that they don't float around your head and nag at you all of the time - check your lists frequently and often, actually doing the things on the list (or delegating them, or archiving the info), otherwise you will lose faith in the system and it will never work - get a filing cabinet, label-maker, and shredder; create a simple filing system and use your filing system often - "tickler system" is a series of files for each day of the year. You file stuff away to be reminded or "tickled" on that specific day (i.e. magazine subscription renewal, buying tickets to a play, etc)

  2. 3 out of 5

    Jamie

    Ironically, looking in to the GTD (Getting Things Done) system has been bouncing around in the back of my head as something to do for quite some time now. This approach to maximizing productivity is popular among the nerdegalian, probably because of its minimum bullshit approach to actually processing, classifying, and executing what the author David Allen calls "stuff to do." This book discusses the GTD system in its entirety and, more importantly, teaches you how to put it in place. What I real Ironically, looking in to the GTD (Getting Things Done) system has been bouncing around in the back of my head as something to do for quite some time now. This approach to maximizing productivity is popular among the nerdegalian, probably because of its minimum bullshit approach to actually processing, classifying, and executing what the author David Allen calls "stuff to do." This book discusses the GTD system in its entirety and, more importantly, teaches you how to put it in place. What I really liked about Allen's work is that it's very straight forward and focused on implementation. It seems like other self-help books in this vein that I've perused are all about inspiration, defining values, motivating yourself, getting in touch with your inner being and letting loose the full potential of you. To those authors I'd like to say the following: No. Stop it. I don't need nor want that, so you can cram it with walnuts, buddy. GTD, in comparison, is prescriptive. Allen gets touchy-feeling in a few places (such as discussing prioritization or project definition) but the vast majority of the book takes a very practical approach to digging yourself out of whatever mountain of commitments you've gotten yourself under and how to stay on top of it once you get there. In short, GTD focuses on getting "stuff" --commitments, to do items, reminders to gather information, requests for information or actions, etc.-- out of your short-term memory and into a physical, highly organized system that will remind you of the right stuff at the right time. Dumping everything out of your short-term memory allows you to do something that's very critical to productivity: focus on one thing at a time. If you're confident that your other commitments or to-dos are safely stored away somewhere and will not be lost or buried out of sight, you can devote all your attention, time, and mental energy to one thing before knocking it out and moving on to the next. I like to think of the system as an artificial, external, and infinitely scalable attention span that you can connect to and disconnect from as needed. That's all well and good, but it's probably not beyond the ken of your average retarded monkey. The tough (and in some places nonintuitive) part is the implementation. Again, there's tons more detail, tricks, and tips in the book, but I'll try to capture the gist of it. There are four major parts to the GTD system: 1. Collecting incoming stuff 2. Processing the stuff 3. Doing the stuff 4. Regularly reviewing your system to make sure your action items and project lists are up to date Collecting stuff is easy. That's just letting stuff accumulate in your physical or virtual receptacles like inboxes, voice mail, or e-mail. Processing stuff is more involved. It requires sitting down with your inboxes and emptying them. That doesn't mean immediately doing the work associated with each piece of stuff as you pick it up --prioritization is important. It means taking a piece of stuff --an e-mail, a document, a voice mail-- and doing something with it: act on it right then, file it, trash it, delegate it, or create what Allen calls a "Next Action" item associated with it. Again, the book is replete with practical tips, hacks, tools, and rules of thumb for deciding which of these things to do and how to keep it all straight. Therein lies some of the book's best value, but it's too detailed to go into here. Doing the stuff is self explanatory, but again I'll emphasize the value of being able to focus on one thing at a time without worrying that other things will be forgotten. It's much more productive and much less stressful. Regularly reviewing your system is also important, and comes in two flavors: as needed and weekly. You may review your action item list (a.k.a., your "to do list") several times a day as needed, if for nothing but that endorphin rush that comes with checking things off as "done" and deciding what to tackle next. Weekly reviews are also important, and are different in that you take the time to check on your list of active projects and make sure you have a Next Action item for each and every one. So I really like the book and its system. I'd recommend it to anyone who feels like they're not being productive enough or getting buried in work. Allen only gets mushy and non-specific in a few places that make it seem like he's trying to pad the page count, but the majority of the book is specific, direct, and practical. I also like that Allen is in tune with the modern technology that most professionals encounter. He spends appropriate amounts of time discussing things like e-mail, Outlook and voice mail. He also talks about implementing GTD with high-tech tools like PDAs, Web 2.0 systems, and palmtop computers, but while GTD lends itself well to these kinds of toys, at its heart it is technology agnostic. You could do the whole thing quite effectively with a pen, some paper, and a bunch of file folders. Indeed, some parts of the system, like the tickler file work best that way.

  3. 3 out of 5

    Jonatron

    I bought this book, and I read some of it. It sat on a shelf unfinished. I read some more. It sat in my car unfinished. I eventually made the decision to never finish it. I think this is self-explanatory. [Later...] Now I'm reading 26 Reasons Not to Use GTD, and it does a good job of articulating the "ehhhh"ness that I felt while reading this. [Even later...] And if you think GTD's followers are a little cult-like (see, for instance, the comments on this review), check this out: When David Allen say I bought this book, and I read some of it. It sat on a shelf unfinished. I read some more. It sat in my car unfinished. I eventually made the decision to never finish it. I think this is self-explanatory. [Later...] Now I'm reading 26 Reasons Not to Use GTD, and it does a good job of articulating the "ehhhh"ness that I felt while reading this. [Even later...] And if you think GTD's followers are a little cult-like (see, for instance, the comments on this review), check this out: When David Allen says in the acknowledgments "deepest thanks go to my spiritual coach, J-R", he's talking about a man named John-Roger "the Mystical Traveler", who believes he is a reincarnation of Jesus, St. Francis of Assisi, and Abraham Lincoln. Allen is a minister in his Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness church. Yup.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melynda

    I'm a big geek, and here's proof (if you needed it). I learned about GTD from Merlin Mann's 43 Folders site, and became an instant convert. Because I love folders, lists, diagrams, flow charts, of course, but most of all because with GTD, you have to have a labeller. I love my labeller. I love making labels for my files, and admiring them in their serried ranks, all neat and labelly. And I do actually seem to be getting more done, even when I factor in all the time I spend labelling.

  5. 3 out of 5

    Bria

    If you find yourself turning a little moist and your pulse quickening with pleasure when you read words and phrases such as: -High-performance workflow management -Family commitments -Priority factors -The ability to be successful, relaxed, and in control during these fertile but turbulent times demands new ways of thinking and working -key work tool -assembly-line modality -workforce -values thinking -desired results -ups the ante in the game -deal effectively with the complexity of life in the twenty-fir If you find yourself turning a little moist and your pulse quickening with pleasure when you read words and phrases such as: -High-performance workflow management -Family commitments -Priority factors -The ability to be successful, relaxed, and in control during these fertile but turbulent times demands new ways of thinking and working -key work tool -assembly-line modality -workforce -values thinking -desired results -ups the ante in the game -deal effectively with the complexity of life in the twenty-first century as well as quotes around "colloquial" phrases, such as "ringing your bell" (which I think he uses incorrectly, at least according to MY understanding of a what a "bell" is and what it means to "ring" it) then not only is this the book for you, this is also the society and era for you, because these things are inescapable and even more so in this book. If such terms instead have you thinking wistfully of the sweet, enveloping darkness to be found at the bottom of your nearest 300-foot drop onto rocky crags, then you have, like me, found yourself woefully living in the wrong universe. You want to be three branes over, where there is still all this awesome new technology and decentralization of art and science and society but nary a hard-charger to be found. In that universe, if someone wants to help others to be more productive, that someone wouldn't expect their readers to slog through a 400-page book that contains about 370 pages of enthusiastic self-congratulation on the startling effectiveness of the method outlined in the remaining 30 pages. Writers in that universe also don't get bored of their own choking newspeak every two paragraphs or so, needing to take a break for a witty and apropos quote, one-sentence summary or reminder of the previous two paragraphs that passed as ephemerally through their own mind as it will through that of the readers, or to just start a new section on either the same or a new topic, either one, it doesn't matter, no one will notice, it's just the same randomly-generated buzzwords bouncing off their eyeballs. However, in that universe as well as our own, the general concept outlined in this book of turning yourself into an automaton of your own design is still valid. Only in that universe when someone wants to get more done in their life by exporting their brain to external resources, it's done matter-of-factly and with little fanfare, since that universe has also failed to create an entire race of creatures that can't figure out how to function without following explicitly outlined methodologies taught to them by highly paid professional consultants. People in that universe have external brains because it's obviously the thing to do, not because it'll make them more effective entrepreneurs, more successful businessmen, more highly admired community leaders not to mention better partners and parents. Half those things aren't taken seriously in this other universe and the other half are taken even less seriously but still done well. There, they learn how to be alive while they're being alive, by being alive, not from a book they read in middle age in desperation after having already failed miserably at living and this is the thing that'll finally get their shit together, I swear to high heaven this is it, for real, everything's gonna be different from here on out. God I wish I was in that universe.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Jarrodtrainque

    With first-chapter allusions to martial arts, "flow,""mind like water," and other concepts borrowed from the East (and usually mangled), you'd almost think this self-helper from David Allen should have been called Zen and the Art of Schedule Maintenance./ Not quite. Yes, Getting Things Done offers a complete system for downloading all those free-floating gotta-do's clogging your brain into a sophisticated framework of files and action lists--all purportedly to free your mind to focus on whatever With first-chapter allusions to martial arts, "flow,""mind like water," and other concepts borrowed from the East (and usually mangled), you'd almost think this self-helper from David Allen should have been called Zen and the Art of Schedule Maintenance./ Not quite. Yes, Getting Things Done offers a complete system for downloading all those free-floating gotta-do's clogging your brain into a sophisticated framework of files and action lists--all purportedly to free your mind to focus on whatever you're working on. However, it still operates from the decidedly Western notion that if we could just get really, really organized, we could turn ourselves into 24//7 productivity machines. (To wit, Allen, whom the New Economy bible Fast Company has dubbed "the personal productivity guru," suggests that instead of meditating on crouching tigers and hidden dragons while you wait for a plane, you should unsheathe that high-tech saber known as the cell phone and attack that list of calls you need to return.)/ As whole-life-organizing systems go, Allen's is pretty good, even fun and therapeutic. It starts with the exhortation to take every unaccounted-for scrap of paper in your workstation that you can't junk, The next step is to write down every unaccounted-for gotta-do cramming your head onto its own scrap of paper. Finally, throw the whole stew into a giant "in-basket"/ That's where the processing and prioritizing begin; in Allen's system, it get a little convoluted at times, rife as it is with fancy terms, subterms, and sub-subterms for even the simplest concepts. Thank goodness the spine of his system is captured on a straightforward, one-page flowchart that you can pin over your desk and repeatedly consult without having to refer back to the book. That alone is worth the purchase price. Also of value is Allen's ingenious Two-Minute Rule: if there's anything you absolutely must do that you can do right now in two minutes or less, then do it now, thus freeing up your time and mind tenfold over the long term. It's commonsense advice so obvious that most of us completely overlook it, much to our detriment; Allen excels at dispensing such wisdom in this useful, if somewhat belabored, self-improver aimed at everyone from CEOs to soccer moms (who we all know are more organized than most CEOs to start with). --Timothy Murphy/

  7. 3 out of 5

    Saud Omar

    بالنسبة لي, هذا الكتاب هو ثالث أفضل كتاب قرأته في مجال تطوير الذات, بعد العادات السبع, وإدارة الأولويات لستيفن كوفي. في الحقيقة اني ترددت قبل كتابة هذه المراجعة, وسبب ذلك اني طبقت أفكار الكتاب لفترة ليست بالقصيرة ( وليست بالطويلة أيضاً ) وأود أن أشارك القراء الكثير من الارشادات والتنبيهات والحيل لتطبيق هذه الأفكار, وكتابة مراجعة في" قود ريدز" ربما لن تسمح بكل هذا .. لذلك قررت أن أكتب هنا عن هذا الكتاب باختصار, وان اضيف المراجعة المفصلة لا حقا في مدونتي. في البداية دعوني أنبّه أن للكتاب ترجمة عربية بالنسبة لي, هذا الكتاب هو ثالث أفضل كتاب قرأته في مجال تطوير الذات, بعد العادات السبع, وإدارة الأولويات لستيفن كوفي. في الحقيقة اني ترددت قبل كتابة هذه المراجعة, وسبب ذلك اني طبقت أفكار الكتاب لفترة ليست بالقصيرة ( وليست بالطويلة أيضاً ) وأود أن أشارك القراء الكثير من الارشادات والتنبيهات والحيل لتطبيق هذه الأفكار, وكتابة مراجعة في" قود ريدز" ربما لن تسمح بكل هذا .. لذلك قررت أن أكتب هنا عن هذا الكتاب باختصار, وان اضيف المراجعة المفصلة لا حقا في مدونتي. في البداية دعوني أنبّه أن للكتاب ترجمة عربية بعنوان ( كيفية إنجاز الأشياء ) وللأسف لا أستطيع ان اوصي بها لأني لم أطلع عليها, لكني أظن أنها من إصدرات جرير, وإصدرات جرير عموما ليست سيئة للحد الذي لا تفهم فيه شيئا مما تقرأ, وليست جيدة للحد الذي يسمح لك بالقراءة من دون معاناة سد ثغرات الترجمة .. الخيار لكم. صدر هذا الكتاب في عام 2002 وتتطورت شعبيته بين قراء ومتابعي كتب تطوير الذات إلى درجة انه صار ظاهرة هستيريه في مجاله, حتى أن مجلة "وايرد" المختصه بالتقنيه وصفته بانه صار ديناً في عصر المعلومات, ومجلة "التايم" أفردت له مقالاً كاملاً واصفته بانه كتاب تطوير الذات لهذا العصر, هذا بالإضافة إلى أن أفكار الكتاب صارت معايير أساسية لكل الأدوات الإنتاجية ( تقاويم, قوائم مهام, ألخ ). الكتاب عبارة عن نظام سهل وبسيط جدا الغرض منه – كما يقول المؤلف ديفيد ألين – زيادة الإنتاجية مع تقليل الضغط النفسي. نظام "كيفية إنجاز الأشياء" – أو ما اشتهر اختصاراً ( بنظام الجي تي دي ) - يتكون من خمس أجزاء: 1 – جمع الأشياء: وفي هذه المرحلة تجمع كل الأشياء التي تريد ان تقوم بها, وتضعها في مكان واحد. 2 – المعالجة: في هذه المرحلة تحدد ماهية الأشياء التي جمعتها بالضبط. 3 – التنظيم: هنا تضع كل مهمة في قائمة محددة. 4 – المراجعة: هنا تراجع قوائم المهام التي لديك. 5 – التنفيذ: في هذه المرحلة تنفذ المهام. ألا تبدو لك هذه الخطوات من الوهلة الأولى بسيطة وبديهية – وربما ساذجة - إلى درجة لا تحتاج كل هذه الضجة؟ نعم هي خطوات بسيطة جدا لكن - وهنا "لكن" كبيرة – حين تنفذها تحدث أمور مدهشة لا تصدق؛ وهذا هو سر شعبية وسحر الكتاب. في الحقيقة أنه لكي أكون اكثر دقة, فسر شعبية الكتاب ليس هذا فحسب, بل كون هذه الافكار ممكنة التطبيق على سياقات كثيرة, فمثلاً أنا أعدت ترتيب ملفات الكمبيوتر, وترتيب مفضلة مواقعي, وأوراقي الدراسية ( هذا بالطبع بالإضافة لترتيب طريقة أدائي لمهامي اليومية ) بناء على أفكاره. في الواقع, أنت لن تجد في الكتاب أي شيء بخصوص ترتيب هذه الأشياء, لكنك سوف تتعلم طريقة ديفيد ألين على النطاق الواسع ( وهو إنجاز المهام اليومية ) ومن ثم سوف تجد انك تستطيع تطبيقها على الكثير من المجالات حولك. الكأس المقدسة لهذه الكتاب, ولهذه الخطوات, هي حاله يسميها ديفيد ألين ( عقل مثل الماء ) فالغرض من كل هذه "الهلليله" هي أن يكون عقلك, مجازاً, مثل الماء. لو كان ديفيد ألين بوذا فحالة ( عقل مثل الماء ) هي ( نيرفانا ) كتاب كيفية إنجاز الأشياء. حالة ( عقل مثل الماء ) تعني ان تفرّغ عقلك من كل الأشياء التي فيه, أن تستخدم عقلك بأكبر صورة ممكنة للتركيز والتفكير وليس للتذكر والتخزين, وأن تتصرف بحسب ما يمليه الموقف بالضبط من دون أي مبالغة أو تقليل في ردة الفعل. لا بد أنه مر عليك مثل هذا الكلام في كتب أو محاضرات تطوير الذات الأخرى, ولا بد أنك لم تحاول منع نفسك من تصنيفه كهراء طازج .. لكن محاولة ديفيد ألين لتحقيق هذا الهدف هي محاولة جادة وأصيلة .. النظام مصمم بالفعل بطريقة ليفرّغ عقلك من كل ما تريد القيام به, ومن ثم ينظمه امامك في قوائم بشكل يسمح لك للوصول إلى اقصى حالة من الإنتاجية. هناك قضيتان لا بد أن نشير لها بخصوص الكتاب: 1 – الكتاب يتعامل مع المستوى المنخفض من الإنتاجية. قضية الكتاب الأساسية هي كيف تنفذ كل ما في عقلك, لكن من أين تأتي الأشياء التي في عقلك؟ ... هذه في الواقع ليست قضية الكتاب .. الكتاب لا يتعامل مع الرؤية والقيم والحوافز والأهداف بعيدة المدى. هذا ليس عيب في الكتاب, ولكنها طبيعة النظام. في مدونتي سوف اتطرق لهذا الكتاب وكتاب ستيفن كوفي ( إدارة الألويات ). كتاب ديفيد الين يتعامل مع المستوى المنخفض من الإنتاجية, وكتاب ستيفن كوفي يتعامل مع المستوى العالي من الإنتاجية؛ والكتابان يكملان بعضهما. 2 – الكتاب يقدم لك أفكاره بشكل مجرد ويقدم لك بعض الاقتراحات لتنفيذها, لكن اختيار افضل طريقة بالنسبة لك لتنفيذها هو بالفعل تحدي حقيقي. سوف أقدم في مدونتي الطرق التي استخدمتها شخصيا وتقييمي لها, وسوف أدلك على الكثير من المصادر التي تستطيع ان تجد فيها تجارب الاخرين, لكن في نهاية المطاف سوف تحتاج ان تجرب عدة خيارات حتى تجد ما يناسبك شخصياً. تمنياتي لكم بقراء ممتعة

  8. 3 out of 5

    Sarah Heffern

    This book should have been a 3,000-word article. It was full of useless details (e.g. listing the types of materials out of which an inbox might be made), redundant to the point of making me crazy, and overflowing with multi-step systems for this, that, and the other (seriously, keeping the 3- or 4- or 6-step filters straight would require flashcards). While it had some useful tips, I can't imagine anyone having the free time to implement the system fully. Clearly, though, I am wrong in this, jus This book should have been a 3,000-word article. It was full of useless details (e.g. listing the types of materials out of which an inbox might be made), redundant to the point of making me crazy, and overflowing with multi-step systems for this, that, and the other (seriously, keeping the 3- or 4- or 6-step filters straight would require flashcards). While it had some useful tips, I can't imagine anyone having the free time to implement the system fully. Clearly, though, I am wrong in this, just google "getting things done" or "gtd" and check out the millions of results.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Letitia

    David Allen's smirking white male face on the cover of this book may convince that he's successful...but the man should reserve his smirk for one on one business dealings. The biggest issue with this book is, I couldn't get it done. Getting Things Done is written for a non-existent audience: a procrastinator with enough motivation to actually plow through Allen's dry instruction manual.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Josh

    I have not had much success applying strategies from productivity gurus. I am referring to books like "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" by Steven Covey, and other books which share use top-down strategies to order our lives. There are two reasons why these have not worked for me. The first is technical: day-to-day life happens on the level of "stuff". The myriad of small tasks of varying importance and in multiple contexts hampers the effectiveness of top-down approaches. The second I have not had much success applying strategies from productivity gurus. I am referring to books like "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" by Steven Covey, and other books which share use top-down strategies to order our lives. There are two reasons why these have not worked for me. The first is technical: day-to-day life happens on the level of "stuff". The myriad of small tasks of varying importance and in multiple contexts hampers the effectiveness of top-down approaches. The second reason is a personal one. The entire mindset of these books is very unappealing to me. Books which simplify and systemize our entire lives, such as Covey's books, seem to suck the imagination and life right out of living. Peter Pan would barf and toss these books to his crocodile buddy. Incredibly, one productivity book has managed to overcome my objections: David Allen's "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity" has succeeded where other books failed. "Getting Things Done" (from now on I'll refer to it as GTD) has made quite a splash since its release in 2001. It's influence is already pervasive and some of the most useful blogs on the internet swear by it. I probably see it randomly mentioned every week. So for anyone who doesn't know much about it, I'd like to summarize the book and at the same time show how beneficial Allen's method has been for me. First of all, GTD is not a top-down approach. Allen explains that "...most people are so embroiled in commitments on a day-to-day level that their ability to focus successfully on the larger horizon is seriously impaired. Consequently, a bottom-up approach is usually more effective." Allen is dead on. I already do plenty of big-picture thinking, and it really hasn't helped me deal with the nitty-gritty details of whatever messy projects and tasks are on my plate. Allen admits that a lot of times what is needed are a few tricks. GTD has equipped me to better deal with my responsibilities, and in some cases gave me some trick that helped make all the difference. The second problem I've had with productivity books is more complex. I believe it is important to maintain a little bit of a child-like disposition in life. My impressions of the professional world are that it creates uniformity and kills creativity. It's very easy to figure out where my attitudes come from: I grew up watching Mary Poppins and Peter Pan, and Peter Pan was the first "big book" that I owned and read. I think I got that book out of my grandpa's library after his funeral. Both of these stories portray growing up as a very dangerous thing to do, and I've never stopped worrying that I will become old, dry, boring, and bored. But whether I like it or not, life happens, and responsibilities accumulate. And here is how "Getting Things Done" succeeds where others fail: without wasting time suggesting a cookie-cutter pattern for my life, it aids in conquering mundane tasks and responisibilities so that my energy can return to the activities that excite me. As I've implemented Allen's method, I've found myself able to mentally relax and in general am feeling a lot more creative again. That's pretty much fantastic! Here is a quick summary of the GTD method. Allen describes a five-stage workflow: collecting anything that commands our attention, processing, organizing the results, reviewing the options, and taking action. Going through these steps for the first time is a huge project; Allen suggests taking several days to do this. It took me quite awhile to get all the papers and "open-loops" collected or written down, and several hours of work to organize them. Fortunately, Allen does plenty of hand-holding through this. If someone as absent minded and flighty as myself can do it, anyone can. Allen also includes chapters on developing and tracking projects (really excellent stuff) and deciding what to do next at any given moment. As a manual, it is very well written. It gives brief overviews of everything before going into greater detail. By the time you are implementing it, you already have a decent grasp of the material. Allen sold me in the early chapters, so I dived in with both feet. It took awhile, but the results are wonderful. I have no loose unorganized papers anywhere. Before I did GTD, my mind felt like it was completely in knots. It's felt that way for years. Now that I don't carry the anxiety of lots of unidentified mental baggage and millions of unsorted papers, my mind feels relaxed and focused. GTD also helps me keep a clear picture of any tasks in front of me, and it's much easier to decide what to do next. Tackling a "next action" list feels a bit like a game. I hope to get one down to zero someday. I am more productive and am feeling more energetic. The method is also somewhat flexible: everyone's implementation will vary a bit. I use a clipboard with next-action divded by context, big wallets to hold file folders in place of a file cabinet, basic office supplies, a paper calendar, and four trays for "inbox", "next action / outbox", "data entry" (for business cards and such), and "waiting for". Very low tech, which is how I like it. Only time will tell what effect all this will have on me. Increased responsibilities will be the real test of GTD's effectiveness. Although GTD will hold special appeal to workaholics and productivity worshippers, it is potentially beneficial to anyone who struggles to keep track of all the little tasks we need to get done. Check it out!

  11. 3 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Probably the best self-help book I ever read - in any case the one I most adapted to the organization of my life. It does not have an annoying religious aura to it like 7 Habits or the selfish haberdashery spirit of How to Win Friends and Influence People, but is down to earth and highly practical. I was able to get to Inbox Zero and have held on to that principal for years now. If folks are interested, I can repost here my own adaptation of the techniques. Still for me a reference!

  12. 3 out of 5

    Tracy

    I'm listening to this because I need to get a grip on my life. I can't even focus enough to listen about how to get my life together, much less do it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    2.65 stars. I've used a mutated version of this for years, but thought I'd try the original text. I was disappointed. I felt it gave equal weight to parts of GTD that are a cakewalk (emptying your mind onto a page) with parts that sound easy but are complex (deciding on next actions). Also I thought the weekly/quarterly review needed more focus. Allen talks about the 20,000/50,000 foot view, but without enough detail on how to accomplish these. I'd recommend reading through a summary instead of the 2.65 stars. I've used a mutated version of this for years, but thought I'd try the original text. I was disappointed. I felt it gave equal weight to parts of GTD that are a cakewalk (emptying your mind onto a page) with parts that sound easy but are complex (deciding on next actions). Also I thought the weekly/quarterly review needed more focus. Allen talks about the 20,000/50,000 foot view, but without enough detail on how to accomplish these. I'd recommend reading through a summary instead of the whole book. There are people who explain Allen's system better than Allen.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Ruben

    I'm really glad my wife and I read this book together. It's already been very helpful in getting us to look at the reason so many things never get done on time or sometimes not at all. The book is well written. The writing is very clear, with lots of examples, though it's a bit dry in the middle and a little flowery on the ends. (That sounds like a description of a scone or something.) We're still working on getting our system set up (I mean filing cabinets for reference material) so I might nee I'm really glad my wife and I read this book together. It's already been very helpful in getting us to look at the reason so many things never get done on time or sometimes not at all. The book is well written. The writing is very clear, with lots of examples, though it's a bit dry in the middle and a little flowery on the ends. (That sounds like a description of a scone or something.) We're still working on getting our system set up (I mean filing cabinets for reference material) so I might need to add more to this in a month's time. I'll let you know then if we're getting more things done. As a matter of fact, that's one test to see whether things are still slipping through the cracks. Read, go! Update: one month later, I can say that I do feel less stressed about things, and I'm getting things done like never before. Mind you, I'm not perfect, but I feel there's been a noticeable upswing in how aware I am of what needs to get done. Just having an organized filing cabinet and inbox and next actions list allows me to see at a glance the things that used to just float around my mind, fighting for attention. My wife and I look forward to our weekly review (Sunday nights at 7:30), when we get to go over every project and make sure that everything's on track. I've been implementing this system in my classroom, too, and that helps with the stacks and stacks of papers I collect as a teacher. I'd love to find some way to teach this to my high school students, who can never remember to do their homework or study for tests. Anyway, I highly recommend this book. Unless you already feel that your system is highly efficient, give it a shot.

  15. 3 out of 5

    da AL

    nicely done & read - wish he'd bring out an updated edition ...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    This is one of those optimistic books in which YOU THE READER can gain control by your own unaided (well almost unaided, you are meant to delegate) efforts, and which doesn't take account of that your workflow might very well be determined by things entirely outside of your control. Not to mention if your working space isn't under your control at all (for example with hot desking) or is very limited (if you are in a drone-zone) then physically some of the ideas here will be impossible. And of cou This is one of those optimistic books in which YOU THE READER can gain control by your own unaided (well almost unaided, you are meant to delegate) efforts, and which doesn't take account of that your workflow might very well be determined by things entirely outside of your control. Not to mention if your working space isn't under your control at all (for example with hot desking) or is very limited (if you are in a drone-zone) then physically some of the ideas here will be impossible. And of course everything in this book is best suited to someone with a secretary or personal assistant. But there are some practical bits and pieces to take away, I've found it useful to not just write a to-do list but also to write by each item what I'm waiting on or what has to be done next to progress the item and the book inspired me to use the email calender feature to pop up reminders of things to do and people to chase. Beware however, just because you can deal with something within two minutes doesn't mean that you should do so! For an absolutely different vision of how a business can work its worth reading Toyota Production System Beyond Large-Scale Production or anything by W. Edwards Deming. In a wider context this is an entirely depressing and soul destroyingly negative book. It's implicit message is that the modern corporate workplace is a meat mincer. Fresh employees are thrown in at one end, the dead and burnt out, ground down and generally used up ones removed and thrown out on to the scrap heap. A functional view of the workplace might be so bold as to posit that people are employed to do a task which contributes towards the achievement of the overall goals and objectives of the organisation. Allen is writing for readers you have experienced something that is very different, in their world nobody cares. If you are struggling to deal with the task you have been employed to do, nobody will notice let alone step in to assist. Your only possible salvation is the life raft of books like this one, offering salvation from the threatening seas of an unlimited workload. Of peculiar interest is that the book is pitched to persons relatively senior - senior enough that they have secretaries or personal assistants. Bizarrely in Allen's world one is appointed to do a job, but there is no reliable way of knowing if you can cope with it or indeed if the job as defined by the organisation can be done by a single person, nor despite the money spent on the employee and their Personal assistant will anybody check or exercise oversight over one's performance. The workplace in Allen's vision is not rational but the site of a particularly lawless gold-rush. Interestingly to my view enough purchasers agree with him to keep him out of the hamster wheel. Like so many 'business' books it ought to be an A4 or A5 laminated card rather than a book hundreds of pages long but apparently there is no money to be made from people in a hurry or who are struggling to achieve stress free productivity.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Before I justify the five-star rating, there are a couple of qualifications: 1. This book is written toward a certain audience: well-to-do people, mostly business executives, mostly men, mostly older. The large majority of examples mentioned are male corporate leaders. There is the occasional nod to a housewife using the system to get her chores done (I kid you not), and a single reference that I can remember to someone whose work is purely creative. I feel that if you know this coming in, it wil Before I justify the five-star rating, there are a couple of qualifications: 1. This book is written toward a certain audience: well-to-do people, mostly business executives, mostly men, mostly older. The large majority of examples mentioned are male corporate leaders. There is the occasional nod to a housewife using the system to get her chores done (I kid you not), and a single reference that I can remember to someone whose work is purely creative. I feel that if you know this coming in, it will be easier to peel the husk and get to the tasty nougat center. 2. The system advocated here will not help you with amorphous creative projects. If you're a writer, Allen offers nothing in the way of how to parcel out a book into attackable chunks and bang out the pages. What it MIGHT do is help you get a clean brain in order to venture into the fog with confidence. If you're the kind of person who has a hard time focusing on creative work because less-important undone projects are nagging at you, this is a great system. I usually dislike business books for exactly the reasons above. But what Allen does is something more applicable to knowledge workers in general. He recognizes that the amount of potential work is infinite, and then says, "Okay, you'll never get it ALL done. Let's talk about how you can at least put everything in its place, so you can feel good about what you're NOT doing." It's way simple, and after using the system for about a month, I can say that it's way effective, at least for me. The essence of Allen's strategy is this: Develop a method for capturing everything you have to do in your life on an ongoing basis, periodically break it all down into actionable steps, arrange those actions in order, and then go to town on them. Let's say you realize one day that you need to get a new computer. In practice it means you should write down "get a new computer" in a central repository, and then your brain should be doing something like this: "Okay, I need a new computer. But first I need to figure out whether I'm getting a Mac or a PC. My friend Dana has a Mac and loves to talk about it. My next action on this should be to call Dana." It was a transformative experience to sit down with all the clutter in my life and break it down into next actions. Last night, I strung my guitar because it finally rose up to the top my big list of things to do. Right now I'm taking the time to write a review of this book because I feel on top of all the other things in my life. I am confident that writing this review is the best thing I could be doing at this exact moment. For the first time I can remember, the miscellaneous open loops in my life are not tugging at my attention. I've closed the ones I can close, and I'm okay with the ones I haven't closed yet. I'll get to them when it's time. In short, if you're a creative person who has any kind of outside commitments (i.e., you don't get to lounge about all day writing or painting or watching the stars), then GTD may be a way to give yourself a clean mental slate when you want to do personal creative work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    Recall the last time you went on a significant vacation from work: before you left you cleared all your to-dos, emptied your inbox, tied all the loose ends, and organized the things you'd tackle when you came back. Felt pretty good to leave that last day, right? David Allen teaches you how to live your life this way: take all your to-dos, projects, etc. then organize them out into Projects, Next Actions, Someday/Maybe projects, Read and Review, and more if you want. Take the Next Actions and eith Recall the last time you went on a significant vacation from work: before you left you cleared all your to-dos, emptied your inbox, tied all the loose ends, and organized the things you'd tackle when you came back. Felt pretty good to leave that last day, right? David Allen teaches you how to live your life this way: take all your to-dos, projects, etc. then organize them out into Projects, Next Actions, Someday/Maybe projects, Read and Review, and more if you want. Take the Next Actions and either do them, defer them, delegate them, and/or delete them. It's really that logical and that simple. Now, make a weekly habit of reviewing all those categories. Now you're "GTD". Just like it ought to, the book starts out broad, then each chapter goes into more detail of the system. Unless you're some crazy detail-loving mogul, you only need to read about to the half-way mark. I went a bit further just because I loved it so much. For about three weeks now, it's worked for me both at work and more loosely at home. The chapter on organizing your email and keeping your inbox empty is BRILLIANT! If you want to see this book in action, I'll show you my email and desk. I recommend this book to just about everyone. Read the first chapter. I probably only buy 3-4 books a year -- usually because the library doesn't own it, but I bought this one after reading the first chapter in the library's copy. I knew I'd want my own.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    A bit too detailed for my taste, but there are some magnificent principles involved here. I learned a lot.

  20. 3 out of 5

    David

    I'd heard about David Allen and his "Getting Things Done" system in the past, but I never paid it much attention. I decided to investigate further a little while back, and finally picked up the book two weeks ago. And now I've read it; and I expect I'll go back and re-read this book in a couple months. I may revise my rating at that time. The things that irritate me in this book are exactly the things I expected might irritate me. There are plenty of the obligatory breezy anecdotes about the clie I'd heard about David Allen and his "Getting Things Done" system in the past, but I never paid it much attention. I decided to investigate further a little while back, and finally picked up the book two weeks ago. And now I've read it; and I expect I'll go back and re-read this book in a couple months. I may revise my rating at that time. The things that irritate me in this book are exactly the things I expected might irritate me. There are plenty of the obligatory breezy anecdotes about the clients Allen has worked with and how impressed they were with the system; the margins of every page are filled with quotes; there are lapses into business motivation jargon; and there are numbered lists in droves. I skimmed some parts. But at the same time, there is something I didn't really expect: very concrete advice about organizational tricks and tactics, introduced with the words "let me assure you that a lot of the value people get from this material is good 'tricks.'" Recognizable meat! No wonder there are so many technical readers who have latched on to this guy. Of course, I still have to see whether I can get the meat to work for me. It's possible that I'll char it into unrecognizability, or that it will give me food poisoning. But I think I've decided to try some of it anyhow.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Powers

    Tried the print and the audio and just couldn't grasp the system which would enable me to get lots and lots of stuff done in an easy manner without struggle. I guess once you get through the book, nothing else seems like as much of a struggle. I should have known it wasn’t for me, when the author said “stop making to-do lists.” I mean, really, what would I do with all the cute sticky note pads I have?

  22. 3 out of 5

    K

    A colleague recommended this book to me because I was seeing an adult client with ADHD. He also shared that he used the principles in this book to run a skills-teaching group for teens with ADHD, and that he uses this system himself. This recommendation came at a time when I was feeling particularly overwhelmed and overloaded at work, so I figured I would try to see if there was anything here that I could adopt so as to better inform my client about how it works while engaging in my own self-imp A colleague recommended this book to me because I was seeing an adult client with ADHD. He also shared that he used the principles in this book to run a skills-teaching group for teens with ADHD, and that he uses this system himself. This recommendation came at a time when I was feeling particularly overwhelmed and overloaded at work, so I figured I would try to see if there was anything here that I could adopt so as to better inform my client about how it works while engaging in my own self-improvement. According to David Allen, we feel overwhelmed and distracted because we have too many commitments on our minds rather than taking action on them and/or filing them away in a system where we can revisit them as needed. These commitments remain in the category of unfinished business, or "open loops," which torture us and stress us out because we haven't figured out how to get rid of them. The first step, says Allen, is to take all the things we're supposed to be doing and collect them into a small number of physical or virtual in-baskets (e.g., a wire tray that sits on your desk plus your e-mail inbox). The number of receptacles for collecting unfinished business should be small, and the information in them needs to be processed regularly. Processing involves going through the items, one by one, and deciding what the next action step is on these items. Although it seems obvious, lots of stuff we need to do stays in never-never land because we never figure out, concretely, what the next step is. Sometimes there is no next step, in which case the item should either be trashed or filed (as reference, or as something to be taken care of at a later date). If there is a next step, you need to decide whether to do it (if it can be done in 2 minutes or less), delegate it (if someone else can do it), or defer it. Deferring an item may include placing it onto a category list, e.g., "calls," "at computer," "errands," "at office," "at home," "agendas" (for people and meetings), or "read/review." You should also keep a list of your ongoing multi-step projects, to be reviewed weekly, with "next steps" categorized into the above categories. Another system is a "tickler file" for things that need to be done on certain days. The tickler file is a drawer full of file folders that is subdivided into months of the year, with a file folder for each day on the calendar. This allows you to file tasks that will be done on days other than today. Your calendar is used only to mark appointments; if you clutter it with task reminders, it will get overwhelming. Once everything you have to do is thus organized, you start each day by looking at your calendar to get a sense of your appointments and what windows of time you have in between. You then review your tickler file for that day and your general lists of next actions (e.g., calls to make, things to do at the computer, errands, etc.) to think about what can be done today, where, and when. There's also the issue of choosing which actions to take in the moment, which involves evaluating your context (e.g., are you near a phone? are you near your computer? are you in the car and available for errands?), time available, energy available, and priority (i.e., out of all the options you could take now in this context, with this amount of time and energy available, which is the most important?). Another important aspect of this system is the weekly review. A time and place must be set aside once a week to gather loose papers and put them in the in-basket for processing, process any notes, action items, etc., review past calendar dates for actionable items, review upcoming calendar dates, document and categorize all open loops and their next actions, review project lists and evaluate what needs to be done, review next action lists, and review any additional checklists. Basically, this book felt like FLYlady for the office. It was an interesting experience for me, because whereas I can be a total slob at home and found FLYlady invaluable for working on changing that (with admittedly inconsistent commitment and progress on my part), I'm actually pretty on top of things at work for the most part. Although I wasn't formally following David Allen's system, I was intuitively using some of his ideas and applying them in my own way. That being said, I found many of his suggestions quite useful and even went out and bought myself a four-tiered tray to keep on my desk for in-box, processing, and out-box. This small change was surprisingly helpful and went a long way toward increasing my sense of control over what I have to do and decreasing my overwhelm. I also think that, for people who are struggling with staying on top of all the things they have to do, this system could be very helpful. But like any system, you need to be committed to following it. Sometimes, it comes down to whether you'd rather stress over making sure to take all your preventative steps to stay on top of things, or stress over having to scramble. I think that adults who struggle with ADHD could consider trying this system out and seeing if it works for them. But I know that aspects of the system, and even the system as a whole, have been helpful for individuals without a diagnosis who simply want a system that keeps them organized.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dillon

    Five stars for the content, two or three for the way it was delivered. But I suspect the purpose of this book wasn't to write beautiful prose, so I'll cut it a break. Since this is a book about an organizational system I'll talk a little bit about what I've tried to incorporate and how mine works. Hopefully doing so will help me to become more conscious of how I can improve it. In a former life - a stupider one, I tried to capture everything in my head. This had results ranging from moderate succ Five stars for the content, two or three for the way it was delivered. But I suspect the purpose of this book wasn't to write beautiful prose, so I'll cut it a break. Since this is a book about an organizational system I'll talk a little bit about what I've tried to incorporate and how mine works. Hopefully doing so will help me to become more conscious of how I can improve it. In a former life - a stupider one, I tried to capture everything in my head. This had results ranging from moderate success to catastrophic failure. Considerable stress and a nagging feeling of imminent collapse as my constant companions, and sleep escaped me. While this was all going on, in college I started using a blank Moleskine and OneNote to capture more of my thoughts, but still stayed mostly disorganized. At this point I don't think I used either the Moleskine or OneNote very well, and I was still mismanaging my time and thus losing sleep just to keep up. When I got a Mac, before OneNote came out for OSX, I migrated to Evernote for my personal and church things. When I started my current job, I started using Evernote for that as well. Once Evernote decided to charge for cross-device access, I jumped back to OneNote, which was now supported on Mac (the irony is that I don't even use the same OneNote account on more than one device). I use OneNote to keep track of daily to-dos and to keep me accountable to my workday schedule. This change was fairly recent (only barely outside of the past six months, I think) - and it's been evolving since I started with it. It started with just a blank sheet as I would use in college, but then I added daily to-dos, and most recently I added a schedule and weekly to-dos (less specific than the dailies). So for my part, I really like the system he outlines and have made efforts to incorporate it into my own workday and outside-of-work calendar. I particularly like the "next actions" concept (I felt like this was half the book) - clearly defining what needs to be done rather than vague "stuff" that need to be checked off. This corresponds to my to-do list - it's not a list of projects, but concrete actions. I will try to organize tasks concretly more consciously from now on. Outside of work, I'm not sure that my life is busy enough to warrant organizing "next actions" by any further granularity - I just use a small planner for my personal life - though this could be because I haven't captured everything. I also like the idea of having a "waiting for" bucket - this was a huge gap in my organizational system and I've added it to my OneNote template. In the short time I've been practicing it, the offloading of mental burdens to an "external brain" has been hugely liberating for me. Like he says, one of the biggest humps to overcome is the "capturing" phase - for me, if I'm sure I captured everything that needs to be done in a day and the next, I can rest much easier. Also, having the weekly review is a great concept. Without periodic reviews, how can I know if I'm on track or not? We'll see. I'm still in the nascent phase of developing my own organization, but this book has been helpful for me to develop a better framework and "mind like water" (I always think of Bruce Lee when he mentioned that phrase in the book). So he had my attention the first time he brought it up. All the good things aside, this book felt much longer than it needed to be - at least from what I took away I think it could have been covered succinctly in five or so chapters, rather than 15. The unnecessary length took away from rather than added to the book - it felt somewhat repetitive and the purpose of one chapter wasn't very clearly distinguishable from the next. Also, the author's face is on the cover and from a distance he looks like another, more famous David (Letterman) - was this a clever marketing ploy to get people to hear what Dave Letterman has to say? If so I'd like to express my disapproval. If not, it's still unusual.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    This is my go-to productivity book. Since reading it a few years ago, I’ve followed GTD in much of my professional and personal life. I highly recommended it to those who want to regain control of their time and become efficiently productive. It teaches how to be “maximally efficient and relaxed” by avoiding “the so-called urgent and crisis demands of any given workday.” Allen says that “if we planned more about our projects and lives, we’d relieve a lot of pressure on our psyches and produce eno This is my go-to productivity book. Since reading it a few years ago, I’ve followed GTD in much of my professional and personal life. I highly recommended it to those who want to regain control of their time and become efficiently productive. It teaches how to be “maximally efficient and relaxed” by avoiding “the so-called urgent and crisis demands of any given workday.” Allen says that “if we planned more about our projects and lives, we’d relieve a lot of pressure on our psyches and produce enormous creative output with minimal effort.” Summary of GTD: 1. Get things out of your head and into a trusted system. 2. Clarify exactly what your commitment is and decide what you have to do. 3. Set reminders for the actions you need to take. Notes A New Practice for a New Reality “[M]ost of the stress people experience comes from inappropriately managed commitments they make or accept.” “Things rarely get stuck because of lack of time. They get stuck because the doing of them has not been defined.” 5 Stages of Mastering Workflow 1. Collect things that command your attention 2. Process what they mean and what to do about them 3. Organize the results 4. Review as options for what you choose to do 5. Do Workflow Diagram - Processing Image from frankcrum.com Use your calendar only for things that absolutely must be done that day. Putting things that don’t have to be done that day is distracting and demoralizing. Use the Weekly Review to “clean house.” Don’t try to stay “squeaky clean” all the time, as it distracts from work at hand. 5 Phases of Planning When a project is stuck, think of your purpose. Think of specifically what a successful outcome would look like. Brainstorm potential steps. Organize your ideas. Decide on the next action. The “why” of a project: Ask “why” to understand the purpose of what you’re doing. What are you really trying to accomplish? The “what” of a project: what will this project really be like when it’s successfully completed? Processing Is it actionable? - No: trash or keep for reference - Yes: decide what the next action is: -- Do it if it takes less than 2 minutes -- Delegate it if others can handle it -- Defer it if you must do it, but it will take more than 2 minutes -- Identify and list any projects (more than 1 action step) The action step needs to be the next physical, visible activity. Organizing Create an email folder named “Action” for emails you must act on. Create an email folder named “Waiting For” for emails you need to track because others are acting on them. Collection End every meeting, discussion, and interaction with asking, “What’s the next action?”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Oy, this guy. If you are a disorganized mess, his book does not have enough step-by-step to help you. If you have a hint of what you're doing, he is quite vague with no actual hands-on tips. Here are his main ideas: -- Your mind is always keeping a running to-do list in the background while you're doing other things. This noise distracts you from what you're doing and makes you feel worried that you should be doing something on that list. Shut out the running to-do list and you can focus on one thi Oy, this guy. If you are a disorganized mess, his book does not have enough step-by-step to help you. If you have a hint of what you're doing, he is quite vague with no actual hands-on tips. Here are his main ideas: -- Your mind is always keeping a running to-do list in the background while you're doing other things. This noise distracts you from what you're doing and makes you feel worried that you should be doing something on that list. Shut out the running to-do list and you can focus on one thing at a time. -- So, empty your head of every to-do, every thought and keep it all in one place. Write one idea on a piece of paper and scribble sub-ideas on the same sheet of paper. -- Decide on what to do and when. Decide on the next action for each major thought and write it down. -- Make a master to-do list and parse it out based on areas of your life (business/personal, calls vs writing, etc.) -- Have your assistant/secretary do a lot of the remembering for you and remind you (oh, wow, that works so well for us peons) -- Oh, and clear off your cluttered mess of a desk. It's mentally distracting you and see point two of gathering up every piece of information laying around. Sound like new ideas? That's because they're not. The whole thing reads like an advert for his consulting business because he gives you just enough information to feel like you don't know what you're doing but not enough concrete tasks to actually get to work. Pretty ironic for a productivity guy. Unless he's trying to drive up the productivity of his consultancy. One more thing -- the guy doesn't even recommend e-mail filters as a time-saver. I use mostly Luddite organizing methods but seriously. Why can't I give this zero stars?

  26. 3 out of 5

    Saeed Ramazany

    خیلی خوشم اومد. از اون کتابایی بود که میگفتم کاش زودتر میخوندم. ایدهی کتاب رو چند روزیاه شروع کردم به پیادهسازی و واقعا دنیا شفافتر(: و سادهتر شده. ذهنم راحتتر شده و سریعتر کارها رو انجام میدم. البته ایدهی کتاب خیلی فضایی و جادویی نیست. صرفا میگه که همه چیزها رو بنویسیم. همه کارهایی که قراره بکنیم، همه اونایی که قرار بوده انجام بدیم و ندادیم(حتی مثلا ۱۰ ساله هی بعضا میاد تو ذهنمون که انجام بدیم) و همه اون کارایی که شاید یه روزی انجام بدیم. همهی اینا باید تو سیستمی باشه که مطمئن باشیم بهش سر میزنیم خیلی خوشم اومد. از اون کتابایی بود که می‌گفتم کاش زودتر می‌خوندم. ایده‌ی کتاب رو چند روزی‌اه شروع کردم به پیاده‌سازی و واقعا دنیا شفاف‌تر(: و ساده‌تر شده. ذهنم راحت‌تر شده و سریع‌تر کارها رو انجام میدم. البته‌ ایده‌ی کتاب خیلی فضایی و جادویی نیست. صرفا میگه که همه چیزها رو بنویسیم. همه کارهایی که قراره بکنیم، همه اونایی که قرار بوده انجام بدیم و ندادیم(حتی مثلا ۱۰ ساله هی بعضا میاد تو ذهنمون که انجام بدیم) و همه اون کارایی که شاید یه روزی انجام بدیم. همه‌ی اینا باید تو سیستمی باشه که مطمئن باشیم بهش سر می‌زنیم و چک می‌کنیم. اگه چک نکنیم، ذهن ما می‌فهمه که این نوشتن‌ها بازی‌ای بیش نبوده و باز سعی می‌کنه همه چی رو خودش حفظ کنه و نگه داره. در حالیکه اگه تو یه سیستم مطمئن(مثلا رو کاغذهایی که سر می‌زنیم، رو یه نرم‌افزار) بنویسیم و چک کنیم، مغز ما می‌فهمه که لازم نیست وظیفه‌ی انبار بودن رو هم انجام بده. لازم نیست تبدیل بشه به یه حافظه‌. عوضش تمام توانش رو می‌زاره برا اون کاری که براش رشد کرده،‌ یعنی انجام دادن و درگیر شدن لحظه‌ای با فعالیتی که در حال انجام دادنش هستیم. همچنین راحت‌تر می‌خوابه. چون می‌دونه یه جایی لیست کارایی که فردا صبح باید انجام بده هست. راحت‌تر هم به تفریحش می‌رسه. چون وقتی تفریح می‌کنه، وقتی سریال می‌بینه، ذهنش هی درگیر این نیست که «نکنه یه کاری یادم رفته باشه؟» هی یه اضطراب مبهم نداره. با خودش و انتخاب‌هاش راحته. و البته دیوید آلن به شدت توصیه می‌کنه که لیست‌ فعالیت‌هایی که باید انجام بدیم حتما Actionable باشن. یعنی مشخص باشند چه کاری فیزیکی‌ای باید انجام بشه. «تولد پسرخاله» یه پروژه‌س، اتوی لباس برای تولد چیزی‌اه که باید بره تو لیست. «خرید ساعت شنی برای هدیه از بازار ولیعصر» چیزی‌اه که باید بره تو لیست. کلا پیشنهاد اکید دارم بیشتر آدما اینو بخونند. در ضمن آخرین نسخه‌ش برا ۲۰۱۵ئه. اونو بخونید.

  27. 3 out of 5

    KatieMc

    If posting your colonoscopy video on social media was a thing, I could really prove to you how much I got done by reading this book. (view spoiler)[what the heck, maybe I'll make it a thing, don't worry, it's SFW http://vid42.photobucket.com/albums/e... (hide spoiler)] Instead, I will just say that I have made some progress in processing through some really stale piles of guilt and I am embracing the "next action". This is a good system for dealing with all the minutiae that make up all that we If posting your colonoscopy video on social media was a thing, I could really prove to you how much I got done by reading this book. (view spoiler)[what the heck, maybe I'll make it a thing, don't worry, it's SFW http://vid42.photobucket.com/albums/e... (hide spoiler)] Instead, I will just say that I have made some progress in processing through some really stale piles of guilt and I am embracing the "next action". This is a good system for dealing with all the minutiae that make up all that we need to do just to manage our careers and lives. As for the book, it was a bit dated. His systems were very paper centric, he talked about getting help from secretaries, and he even mentioned palm pilots! (view spoiler)[I have a few of these in my personal electronics graveyard (hide spoiler)] Well no wonder, I started out listening to the audiobook, which was an abridged version published in 2002. Not satisfied, I checked out the dead-tree copy of the newly revised 2015 version of the book. I only managed to skim and review a few sections, and it seems a bit more relevant, but this guy still loves his paper folders and label makers. The library book has to go back, but I might revisit this again. 2016 reading challenge checks the box for 13. A non-fiction book you learn something new from

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I need all the help I can get!

  29. 3 out of 5

    Yodamom

    I'm sure this would work for many but it is not something that would work for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Since it might take less than two minutes to write this review, I'll just do it now... The two-minute rule is one of the only things I remember from this book (which I read more than five years ago). I generally like the rule, but have found it problematic when something else also comes to mind, and I forget what that was within two minutes =) By the time I came to read this, I had already learned many productivity strategies from other books and programs. Perhaps I might have walked away with m Since it might take less than two minutes to write this review, I'll just do it now... The two-minute rule is one of the only things I remember from this book (which I read more than five years ago). I generally like the rule, but have found it problematic when something else also comes to mind, and I forget what that was within two minutes =) By the time I came to read this, I had already learned many productivity strategies from other books and programs. Perhaps I might have walked away with much more if this were one of the first/only books I've read.

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