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A Farewell to Arms

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A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work ca A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep. Ernest Hemingway famously said that he rewrote the ending to A Farewell to Arms thirty-nine times to get the words right.


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A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work ca A Farewell to Arms is the unforgettable story of an American ambulance driver on the Italian front and his passion for a beautiful English nurse. Set against the looming horrors of the battlefield—weary, demoralized men marching in the rain during the German attack on Caporetto; the profound struggle between loyalty and desertion—this gripping, semiautobiographical work captures the harsh realities of war and the pain of lovers caught in its inexorable sweep. Ernest Hemingway famously said that he rewrote the ending to A Farewell to Arms thirty-nine times to get the words right.

30 review for A Farewell to Arms

  1. 3 out of 5

    Meg

    I feel like awarding the great Hemingway only two stars has officially consigned me to the seventh circle of literary hell. But I must be honest. By this website's criteria two stars indicates that a book is "okay" - and to me that describes this work perfectly. Hemingway himself is undeniably gifted. I love his succinct style (though at times it degenerates to downright caveman-speak), his honest diction and his wonderful sense of humor. That being said, he gets away with utterly ignoring most r I feel like awarding the great Hemingway only two stars has officially consigned me to the seventh circle of literary hell. But I must be honest. By this website's criteria two stars indicates that a book is "okay" - and to me that describes this work perfectly. Hemingway himself is undeniably gifted. I love his succinct style (though at times it degenerates to downright caveman-speak), his honest diction and his wonderful sense of humor. That being said, he gets away with utterly ignoring most rules of writing - which I admire at times, but let's face it, some of those rules are there for a REASON. This book is overflowing with extreme run-on sentences, constant use of qualifiers (I think "very" might actually be his VERY favorite word), adjectives (even NOUNS!) used four or five times in the same paragraph, and long stretches of dialogue involving more than two speakers with absolutely no indication of who is saying what (if I hadn't been reading a library book, I would have color-coded the darn thing!) And besides style, the story itself just didn't grab me. I didn't give two farts about the self-absorbed, unthinking, unfeeling protagonist or his codependent, psychologically damaged doormat of a girlfriend. This is NOT a love story. In fact, I feel sorry for anyone who thinks it is. Men who hate women are incapable of writing love stories. And for the life of me, I can't derive a theme - or even a general POINT - to this book... unless mayhap it is "stupid, senseless tragedy happens sometimes to people you don't care about." I did feel like crying several times while reading, though... but only because of the mention of alcohol on almost every page of text... I could literally HEAR Hemingway drinking himself to death. It broke my heart. CRAP WE LET HIM GET AWAY WITH BECAUSE HE'S HEMINGWAY: "We walked to the door and I saw her go in and down the hall. I liked to watch her move. She went on down the hall. I went on home. It was a hot night and there was a good deal going on up in the mountains. I watched the flashes on San Gabriele. I stopped in front of the Villa Rossa. The shutters were up but it was still going on inside. Somebody was singing. I went on home." (FOR THE LOVE WILL SOMEBODY HELP THIS GUY GET HOME????) "I came up onto a road. Ahead I saw some troops coming down the road. I limped along the side of the road and they passed me and paid no attention to me. They were a machine-gun detachment going up toward the river. I went on down the road." (FOR THE LOVE WILL SOMEBODY HELP THIS GUY GO ON DOWN THE ROAD???) And now that I've slammed him so hard, here is a glimpse at the genius that allows him to get away with it all. FAVORITE QUOTES: "If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry." "They were beaten to start with. They were beaten when they took them from their farms and put them in the army. That is why the peasant has wisdom, because he is defeated from the start. Put him in power and see how wise he is." "The coward dies a thousand deaths, the brave but one... Who said it?... He was probably a coward. He knew a great deal about cowards but nothing about the brave. The brave dies perhaps two thousand deaths if he's intelligent. He simply doesn't mention them." "Life isn't hard to manage when you've nothing to lose." "I was blown up while we were eating cheese." AND MY FAVORITE SCENE: (His friend Rinaldi begins the dialogue) "Loan me fifty lire." I dried my hands and took out my pocket-book from the inside of my tunic hanging on the wall. Rinaldi took the note, folded it without rising from the bed and slid it in his breeches pocket. He smiled, "I must make on Miss Barkley the impression of a man of sufficient wealth. You are my great and good friend and financial protector." "Go to hell," I said.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Skylar Burris

    The old joke proves itself upon reading. Q: Why did the chicken cross the road? A (Hemingway): To die. In the rain.

  3. 3 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally.) The CCLaP 100: In which I read a hundred so-called "classics" for the first time, then write reports on whether or not they deserve the label Book #17: A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway (1929) The story in a nutshell: Published in the late 1920s, right when Modernism was first starting to become a (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally.) The CCLaP 100: In which I read a hundred so-called "classics" for the first time, then write reports on whether or not they deserve the label Book #17: A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway (1929) The story in a nutshell: Published in the late 1920s, right when Modernism was first starting to become a commercially successful form of the arts, A Farewell to Arms is Ernest Hemingway's wry and cynical look at World War I, the event that most defined not only his generation but also the beginning of the Modernist movement. Semi-autobiographical in nature, the book tells the story of Frederic Henry, known to most as "Tenente" (Italian slang for "Lieutenant"), a young and gung-ho American who couldn't get accepted by the American military during the war, so volunteered to be an ambulance driver for the Italian army instead. One of the first of Hemingway's tales to define the stoic "man's man" he would eventually become known for, the novel basically follows Tenente through a series of thrilling escapades, made even more interesting because of the main character not seeing them as thrilling at all -- nearly having his leg torn off while at the front, saving a man's life, escaping execution by diving off a bridge, a rowboat ride to Switzerland in the middle of the night while fleeing a group of pursuers, and a whole lot more. Like I said, though, Hemingway's point here is not to glamorize war, but rather to highlight the mundane aspects of it all; the endless red tape, the weasely things people do to get out of actual work, the BS conversations that are always taking place among soldiers, all of them arguing over how the war is going but none of them actually possessing any factual information. At the same time, though, A Farewell to Arms is about the monstrous developments of World War I in particular, the very first large war to be fought during the Industrial Age, and therefore capable of inflicting so much more carnage than anyone thought possible. (For example, the brand-new European railway system is heavily featured throughout the book, and especially the fact that in a half-day's ride, you could go literally from the battlefront to a five-star luxury hotel, something that had never been possible before WWI.) Oh, and if all this wasn't enough, Hemingway throws in a love story too, a complicated one featuring a complicated woman, one that has been a source of heated interpretation since the book first came out 79 years ago. The argument for it being a classic: There seems to be two main arguments for this being a classic, one based on the author and one on the book itself. Because the fact is that Hemingway is considered by many to be one of the most important novelists in the history of that format, a fabled "High Priest of Modernism" who taught all of us to think in a punchier, shorter way, and with this mostly being for the better for the arts in general. Because let's not forget, a mere twenty or thirty years before this book was first published, it was actually the flowery and overwritten Victorian style of literature that dominated the publishing industry; and as we've all learned throughout the course of this "CCLaP 100" essay series, although Victorian literature certainly has its charms and inherent strengths, it's also a whole lot of talking to say not much at all, a situation that was starting to drive artists crazy by the time the 20th century got into swing. Hemingway, fans claim, was the first Modernist to really bring all the details together in a profoundly great way -- the first to combine the exciting rat-a-tat style of pulp-fiction writers with the weighty subjects of the academic community, producing work that owes as much to Raymond Chandler as it does to Virginia Woolf but is ultimately much better than simply reading those two authors back-to-back. And by making its subject World War I, fans say, Hemingway here turns in yet another great document of those times that the early Modernists were known for -- from The Great Gatsby to All Quiet Among the Western Front, it's hard for us to even think of the artists from the "Jazz Age" or "Lost Generation" or whatever you want to call it, without thinking of this globe-changing event that was so in the middle of it. There's a good reason, after all, that many consider A Farewell to Arms one of the greatest war novels of all time. The argument against: Of course, there are others who can't even hear the words "Ernest Hemingway" without automatically shuddering, again for a variety of reasons that even most of his fans admit hold at least some weight -- because he is overrated by the academic community, because his personal style is a hackneyed, easily parodied one, because his "man's man" shtick got real old real fast, because it's now inspired three generations of a--holes (and counting) to want to be bull-fleeing, cigar-smoking woman-haters too. At its heart, its critics say, A Farewell to Arms is an interesting-enough little ditty, mostly because Hemingway himself had some interesting little experiences during the war that he basically cribbed wholesale for the book; but then this story is covered with layer after layer of bad prose, macho posturing, and aimless meanderings that get you about as far away from a traditional three-act novel as you can possibly get. With Hemingway and his critics, it's never a case of "it's a good enough book but shouldn't be labeled a classic;" those who dislike him really dislike him, and wish to see his work removed from academic reading lists altogether. "classic" label or not. My verdict: So let me embarrassingly admit that this is actually the very first book by Hemingway I've ever read, and that I was hesitant going into it because of just the overwhelming amount of bad stuff that's been said about him over the decades; to be truthful, I was half-expecting a parody of Hemingway at this point, all little words and nonsensical sentences and dudes treating girls kinda like crap most of the time. And yes, the book does for sure contain a certain amount of all this; but I was surprised, to tell you the truth, by how how tight, illuminating, fascinating and just plain funny A Farewell to Arms turned out to actually be. Wait, funny, you say? Sure; I dare you not to laugh, for example, during the scene when a huge argument breaks out between two Swiss border guards over which of their two hometowns boasts better winter sports. ("Ah, you see? He does not even know what a luge is!") This is what makes it such an intriguing novel about war, after all, because Hemingway expertly shows just how many surreal moments there are during times of war as well, that "war" doesn't just mean the two lines of soldiers facing each other at the front but also an entire region, an entire industry, an entire population. Hemingway's World War I is not just seen from the smeared windshield of a battlefront ambulance, but from bored soldiers getting drunk in a quiet bunker, from weary villagers hoping there will be at least something left of their homes after the war is over, from armchair pundits recovering in crumbling veteran hospitals, arguing over which complicated international treaty sunk them all and which is going to save them. It's an expansive, multi-facted, sometimes highly unique look at a wartime environment, one that at least here in his early career (he published this when he was 30) belies all the complaints that have ever been made about his hackneyed personal style. And as far as that love story in the middle of it all, and the repeated complaints about Hemingway's characters all being misogynists...well, maybe it was just me, but I found his Catherine Barkley to be the very model of a modern independent woman (or at least modern and independent in 1920s terms), a fiercely intelligent and cynical creature who expects the same from her lovers, even while realizing that such a man is destined to either die in the environment they're currently in, or survive just to become a bitter, angry a--hole later in life. The way I see it, Catherine is simply trying to make the best of a bad situation; she needs love and intimacy in her life as much as anyone else, and especially in her role as a risk-taking, thick-skinned nurse just a few miles from the battle's front, but also understands that Tenente is destined to befall one of the two fates just mentioned, thus explaining the curious push/pull emotions she has towards him and the way she treats him throughout the novel. It's a surprisingly sophisticated relationship at work, the same thing that can be said of the novel in general; I don't know about the rest of Hemingway's work (yet, anyway), but at least A Farewell to Arms turned out to be a surprisingly cracking read, not only a definite classic but just an all-around amazing book in general. It comes highly recommended today. Is it a classic? Yes

  4. 3 out of 5

    Matt

    I just finished it, and I'm disappointed. And not only disappointed; I'm also bothered by it. I guess I shouldn't be surprised at Hemingway's one-dimensional, sexist portrayal of Catherine Barker, having read much of his other work, but somehow I still am. Put simply, Catherine is a ridiculous figure, and it's no fault of her own. Hemingway gives her no opportunity to sound like anything more than a half-crazy, desperate, fawning caricature with no real desires or opinions of her own. How many t I just finished it, and I'm disappointed. And not only disappointed; I'm also bothered by it. I guess I shouldn't be surprised at Hemingway's one-dimensional, sexist portrayal of Catherine Barker, having read much of his other work, but somehow I still am. Put simply, Catherine is a ridiculous figure, and it's no fault of her own. Hemingway gives her no opportunity to sound like anything more than a half-crazy, desperate, fawning caricature with no real desires or opinions of her own. How many times must I read lines like, "I'll say just what you wish and I'll do what you wish and then you will never want any other girls, will you?" issue from her lips? Does Hemingway believe women think and talk like this, or does he mean to make his female characters sound like would-be wife-pets? (I just read a review below that describes Henry and Catherine's dialogue as 'incantations,' the point being that the two, especially Catherine, are trying to will themselves to be happy despite an over-whelming sense of despair. It's an interesting point,and definitely makes reading the scenes with the two of them more palatable. But as much as I'd like to think that that was what Hemingway was going for, I don't know...) As for the rest of the book, I suppose an argument could be made for its "ground-breaking" sexual frankness or for the necessarily graphic depictions of the front, and I'll buy that. There are, after all, a number of great moments. Still, it's hard to accept the canonization this book as THE central WWI novel and ignore the fact that one of its main characters is very poorly written, perhaps intentionally so.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    I'm not a Hemingway guy. I yearn for internal dialogue, various and ladened spiritual questioning, and deep psychology in my characters. I prefer writing that is smooth and philosophical. Hemingway gives me little of this. But the settings of this book were beautiful, and the dialogue between characters, poignant. By the end, I found that Hemingway had craftily fucked with me to the point of my complete immersion into the novel. It made me cry.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Riku Sayuj

    War is Boring Hemingway’s narrator writes not as a soldier but as a journalist-soldier, channeling Hemingway himself, recording with precision and apparent objectivity the things that happen around him and to him - practical and prosaic and always pragmatic about everything. People die and bombs explode in the same paragraph as the one where breakfast was considered with equal interest, and he takes it all in his stride. As best as I can tell, the action of A Farewell to Arms takes place from 19 War is Boring Hemingway’s narrator writes not as a soldier but as a journalist-soldier, channeling Hemingway himself, recording with precision and apparent objectivity the things that happen around him and to him - practical and prosaic and always pragmatic about everything. People die and bombs explode in the same paragraph as the one where breakfast was considered with equal interest, and he takes it all in his stride. As best as I can tell, the action of A Farewell to Arms takes place from 1916 and before the end of the war. Place references and political references come and go without troubling the narrator too much - he is not to be bothered with such details. His context is not simply this war, but all wars and the notions of honor, heroism and patriotism - all of which he looks at with pristine incomprehension. War always generates backlash, even from the Mahabharata and the Iliad to the many anti-war epics over the ages - the honor and glory that war is supposed to provide is questioned in its aftermath. The bloodlust and the fever-pitch cries of honor precedes war and then they calm down into searching questions about what those terms mean or into scathing parodies. I am not entirely sure whether Farewell to Arms is a sober questioning of these virtues or a shambolic parody of them. It is never quite clear whether Hemingway is making fun of war or just expressing profound ennui. Especially when he combines Love with War, and both seem to get the same treatment, it becomes even harder to deduce whether Hemingway is ridiculing war and its virtues or life and its delusions in general and including love also into it. After all, the famous ending doesn’t leave us with much to pick up the pieces after. The narrator tells the often ugly truth about war, without even trying to be anti-war in any way. By depicting daily life, he achieves it without an effort. It is the prosaicness of action, the utter lack of drama that becomes the most significant force in the narration - even his injury is incurred not in valorous combat but while he is eating spaghetti. All this combines to show up war as a hideous game, but one entirely not worth the bother. There are so many subtle ways in which he trivializes war, always retaining the impression that it is not a conscious effort, as if he was not even telling us anything about the war, letting it remain in the background as a boring humm. “The war seemed as far away as the football games of some one else's college.” We are not even allowed particularly intelligent characters to liven up the drudgery of our reading, the novel is full of the Ordinary, the exceptional striking in its absence - and the readers are left disoriented, repeatedly trying to remind themselves that they are in the midst of the greatest and most destructive war humanity had yet known. In the end, war is exposed as not only meaningless but boring. Usually war writers exploit the Pathos of war, Hemingway walks right inside, shows us around and escorts us out after having shown us the utter blandness of the ‘heroic’ exercise. Even the “Love Story” is constructed out of the boring bits and of repeated bland conversations that seem almost never-ending and droll. Here Hemingway is probably playing us again: instead of the usual technique of showing the pleasant bucolic scenery of distant daily-life and contrasting that against gory war scenes and thus asking the reader to thirst for the war to end, Hemingway places both the personal and the public sphere next to each other, exposes both and yet somehow derides war through this. I am not yet sure how he does that, but my feelings wherever I encountered this tells me that he does it well. Hemingway’s notorious fault is the monotony of repetition, and he has always been considered a better short story writer than novelist - the short form plays into his prowess for portraying ironies in short staccato beats. In A Farewell to Arms, he brings both his strengths and weakness as a storyteller and makes them both work for him masterfully. He converts the act of boring the reader into an art form and into an exercise in supreme irony. Very effective. Almost as effective as comedy, if you ask me. While it is hard to interpret A Farewell to Arms as hopeful, to me it was so, though in a subtle way. It leaves us the hope that if only more soldiers could be like the Tenente and just walk away from all the boredom, even though only boredom awaits in normal life, things could be better. To me the most striking impression of all, in a work filled with unforgettable impressions, was the sheer acceptance exhibited by the narrator: The hustle of the war, his own life, and the entire world even seems to move past the stoic Tenente who is left a mere spectator, but who never seems to question the events that unfold. This captures the spirit of the war and also of the times.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    663. A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway set during the Italian campaign of World War I. The book, published in 1929, is a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant ("tenente") in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army. The title is taken from a poem by 16th-century English dramatist George Peele. A Farewell to Arms is about a love affair between the expatriate American Frederic Henry and Catherine Barkley against 663. A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms is a novel by Ernest Hemingway set during the Italian campaign of World War I. The book, published in 1929, is a first-person account of American Frederic Henry, serving as a lieutenant ("tenente") in the ambulance corps of the Italian Army. The title is taken from a poem by 16th-century English dramatist George Peele. A Farewell to Arms is about a love affair between the expatriate American Frederic Henry and Catherine Barkley against the backdrop of the First World War, cynical soldiers, fighting and the displacement of populations. The publication of A Farewell to Arms cemented Hemingway's stature as a modern American writer, became his first best-seller, and is described by biographer Michael Reynolds as "the premier American war novel from that debacle World War I." تاریخ نخستین خوانش: ماه اکتبر سال 1972 میلادی عنوان: وداع با اسلحه؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: نجف دریابندری؛ تهران، سازمان کتابهای جیبی؛ 1340؛ در 276 ص؛ چاپ 1344 در 346 ص؛ چاپ 1362 در 410 ص؛ چاپ هفتم در 410 ص؛ چاپ نیلوفر، 1376، در 423 ص؛ چاپ دوازدهم 1382؛ چهاردهم 1387؛ شانزدهم 1392؛ شابک: 9789644480591؛ موضوع: داستانهای جنگ جهانگیر نخست - 1914 تا 1918 میلادی - قرن 20 م عنوان: وداع با اسلحه؛ نویسنده: ارنست همینگوی؛ مترجم: ر. مرعشی؛ تهران، پروین؛ 1354؛ در 224 ص؛ ترجمه ها دیگر: نازی عظیما؛ نشر افق؛ هانیه چوپانی، نشر آسو و نشر کوله پشتی؛ کیومرث پارسای، نشر ناژ؛ رمانی نوشته ارنست همینگوی نویسنده آمریکایی و برنده جایزه نوبل ادبیات است که در سال 1929 میلادی منتشر شد. داستان آن درباره جوانی آمریکایی با نام فردریک هنری است که با درجه ستوان در جنگ جهانی اول در بخش آمبولانس‌ها در ارتش ایتالیا خدمت می‌کند. عنوان رمان از شعری برگرفته شده که جرج پیل در سده ی شانزدهم میلادی سروده‌ است. ... ا. شربیانی

  8. 4 out of 5

    Warwick

    In the fall of that year we rented a house in the mountains that looked down across the river to the village below. The water of the river was turquoise and the village had a pretty campanile and beyond it rose more mountains and beyond them still more. The man who owned our cottage lived next door and made his own dry cured sausage and we would go round and eat it by the fire and talk about how fine the sausage tasted. On the hills all around there were deer, and in the evenings we would sit on In the fall of that year we rented a house in the mountains that looked down across the river to the village below. The water of the river was turquoise and the village had a pretty campanile and beyond it rose more mountains and beyond them still more. The man who owned our cottage lived next door and made his own dry cured sausage and we would go round and eat it by the fire and talk about how fine the sausage tasted. On the hills all around there were deer, and in the evenings we would sit on the balcony of our cottage and wrap ourselves in blankets for the cold, and if we looked one way we would see the deer and if we looked the other way we would see the village down at the bottom of the valley. The village was called Kobarid but it also had names in other languages. The Germans called it Karfreit and the Italians called it Caporetto and I said to Hannah that it was never a good sign when so many other languages had names for one little village. Sure enough we found a museum in the village dedicated to a big battle that had taken place there during the First World War. The people at the museum pointed at the mountain slopes and I don't remember exactly what they told us but I remember feeling sick and upset and thinking that I ought to know more about what had happened there and why. The Italian army had gotten through a lot of ambulances during that war and one of the men who drove the ambulances at Kobarid was an American called Ernest Hemingway. Later he wrote a book about it and this is that book. The war parts are very good but gradually they recede into the background and a tragic love story comes to the foreground, and the tragic love story is difficult to enjoy because the woman is so old-fashionedly self-effacing and devoted to the hero that she seems either unrealistic or infuriating to modern readers. The prose is direct and world-weary and often it sounds fine and ironic and cynical like this: If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks everyone and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry. But often it just seems gratuitously pessimistic and this is especially true for the way the book ends. When I went to Kobarid we were very happy. I remember the place very well because we were on the porch of our cottage there when I asked Hannah to marry me. She said yes and our memories of that mountain and that village are very happy ones. This book does not end in the same way and although it is strong and powerful I really wish someone had told me that I should not be reading this ending while my wife is nine months' pregnant. (Dec 2013)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Well, that was disappointing. For several months I've been focused on reading more classic literature, mostly as a way to dig deep and enrich my life during these trying political times. Until now, it has been an incredibly rewarding experience. This Hemingway novel was my first dud. I wanted to like this book. I've been reading more on World War I this past year and thought A Farewell to Arms would fit both my WWI interest and my goal of appreciating classics. But ol' Hem (as I learned to call h Well, that was disappointing. For several months I've been focused on reading more classic literature, mostly as a way to dig deep and enrich my life during these trying political times. Until now, it has been an incredibly rewarding experience. This Hemingway novel was my first dud. I wanted to like this book. I've been reading more on World War I this past year and thought A Farewell to Arms would fit both my WWI interest and my goal of appreciating classics. But ol' Hem (as I learned to call him in A Moveable Feast, a book of his I did like) didn't make it easy for me when he wrote the character of Catherine Barkley. Catherine plays the love interest in this novel, and she is so insipid, silly and annoying that I started dreading this book. The story follows Frederic Henry, an American serving as an ambulance driver in the Italian army during the war. He meets Catherine, who is a British nurse, and they fall in love. Catherine eventually becomes pregnant, and they manage to escape to Switzerland. The ending of this book is depressing, as are most war novels. But the sad ending isn't why I disliked this book so much. Hemingway is famous for his "terse prose," but I think in this book it does him a disservice. The characters are two-dimensional, the war scenes lacked grit, and the whole novel just felt flat to me. Hem does have a few famous lines that came from Farewell (some noted below), which is what kept this book from a 1 rating for me. I listened to this on audio, performed by the talented John Slattery (of "Mad Men" fame) but not even he could make me excited to read this Hemingway book. It reminded me of when I listened to Colin Firth read Graham Greene's The End of the Affair, and Firth's marvelousness couldn't salvage that novel, either. Both are good actors doing their best with mediocre texts. If I were going to recommend a World War I novel to someone, I would tell them to read All Quiet on the Western Front, and to skip Farewell. I'll circle back around to some other Hem novels in the future, but for now I'm going to enjoy a break from his terseness.* *Note: My first instinct when writing this review was to imitate Hem's signature style, lots of "fine and true and good and courage" and whatnot, but frankly, Warwick wrote his review so well that I abandoned the idea and encourage you to check out his grand version. Good Quotes "All thinking men are atheists." "If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry." "I know the night is not the same as the day: that all things are different, that the things of the night cannot be explained in the day, because they do not then exist, and the night can be a dreadful time for lonely people once their loneliness has started." Final Thought One addendum is that I had a print copy of A Farewell to Arms that included Hemingway's introduction to the 1948 edition, and I liked those 3 1/2 pages better than I liked the entire novel. If you do give this book a chance, try to find a copy with that author intro. "The fact that the book was a tragic one did not make me unhappy since I believed that life was a tragedy and knew it could have only one end. But finding you were able to make something up; to create truly enough so that it made you happy to read it; and to do this every day you worked was something that gave me a greater pleasure than any I had ever known. Beside it nothing else mattered."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Agir(آگِر)

    این کتاب زاویه دید متفاوتی از جنگ را روایت میکنه و البته باز قهرمان کتاب مردی است با شخصیتی خاص افسری آمریکایی در ایتالیا و در بحبوبه جنگ درگیر عشق با پرستاری انگلیسی می شود صحنه جنگی هم در کتاب کم نیست و همچنین نشان دادن واقعیت جنگ سربازان و سرگردانی که دنبال فرصتی اند که از جنگ فرار کنند یا مرخصی بگیرند حتی بخودشون ضربه میزنند تا در بیمارستان بستری بشوند عشق زیبای فردریک هنری و کاترین بارکلی نقطه اوج داستان بود.این قسمت رو همینگوی عالی در آورده بود و سرشار از احساس بود ولی از صحنه جنگ و تشریحش اصلا این کتاب زاویه دید متفاوتی از جنگ را روایت میکنه و البته باز قهرمان کتاب مردی است با شخصیتی خاص افسری آمریکایی در ایتالیا و در بحبوبه جنگ درگیر عشق با پرستاری انگلیسی می شود صحنه جنگی هم در کتاب کم نیست و همچنین نشان دادن واقعیت جنگ سربازان و سرگردانی که دنبال فرصتی اند که از جنگ فرار کنند یا مرخصی بگیرند حتی بخودشون ضربه میزنند تا در بیمارستان بستری بشوند عشق زیبای فردریک هنری و کاترین بارکلی نقطه اوج داستان بود.این قسمت رو همینگوی عالی در آورده بود و سرشار از احساس بود ولی از صحنه جنگ و تشریحش اصلا لذت نبردم.بنظرم کمی بیش از حد طولانی شده بود فک کنم این کتاب برام وداع با همینگوی هم بود پیرمرد و دریا و این کتابش رو خوندم.دیگه حسی برای خوندن کتاب دیگری از ایشون ندارم

  11. 3 out of 5

    Becky

    Once, there was a time when I would have struggled through this one, convinced that since it was a "classic", there must be some redeeming quality to it. I'd have struggled to the bitter end, hating it more and more, and I'd have been disappointed by it even if there was something worthwhile at the end. Because getting there was tedious, boring, painful, and annoying. This book has a lot of very varied reviews and opinions. Lots of people loved it, lots of people hated it. I can see why. It's a Once, there was a time when I would have struggled through this one, convinced that since it was a "classic", there must be some redeeming quality to it. I'd have struggled to the bitter end, hating it more and more, and I'd have been disappointed by it even if there was something worthwhile at the end. Because getting there was tedious, boring, painful, and annoying. This book has a lot of very varied reviews and opinions. Lots of people loved it, lots of people hated it. I can see why. It's a book that some people will definitely like. Masculinity, heavy drinking, etc will naturally appeal to some more than others. The love story aspect will appeal to some that aren't so much into the other stuff, and the war stuff will do for still more, maybe. Usually, the war and the masculinity and stuff would be my thing - but this just didn't do anything for me. I think that this was due to the writing, and the reading. I didn't like the reader at all. He had a kind of clipped reading style, and since the writing was full of short sentences, it made it hard for me to settle into the reading and listen. A good reader needs a quality that draws a listener in - but this one did just the opposite. I struggled on through about 3 discs and I just could not stand the reader enough to get into the story. And the story wasn't doing much to help. Staccato sentences, back and forth. Lots of pointless dialogue that, I suppose, in the end would have painted a full picture and come together, but I just found myself not caring at all. And this featured my very least favorite writing trick ever: using dialogue to replace explaining action... "Here drink this. No all of it. It will do you good!" "I don't want it. Put it on the table." "Here - you drink it all up! There's a good boy. You'll see. It'll do you good like I say. No, sit down. Listen to me now." "Answer the door, I think it's unimportant person number 4 coming to tell us something unimportant. What's he saying?" "Go sit back down, I'll tell you everything in a minute. Here, drink more of this. Good." The romance aspects, what little I saw, were just as abrasive and annoying. "Oh, I love you! Do you love me? Say you love me." "Yes I love you." "Oh, you're just saying that! It's the war. You don't mean it." "Yes, I do." "No, you don't" "Yes, really." "Ok, sure. Because I love you, but you don't have to lie to me." BLAH! Shut up. Who cares?! I just struggled along, in this three-against-one uphill battle... And they won. I raised my white flag and gave up. No mas, por favor.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    It is a strong story, beautiful and sad at the same time. It is a novel of war; a novel of men who question, drink, go to the brothel of the front, who fight, who die or are seriously wounded, who try to understand where it leads them. It is a love story that lasts an hour, a night, a life; which fills the void of man's solitude with the horror of war; which grows in the face of the absurdity of great words such as "duty and honor". A rich vocabulary and a very particular rhythm made of small sen It is a strong story, beautiful and sad at the same time. It is a novel of war; a novel of men who question, drink, go to the brothel of the front, who fight, who die or are seriously wounded, who try to understand where it leads them. It is a love story that lasts an hour, a night, a life; which fills the void of man's solitude with the horror of war; which grows in the face of the absurdity of great words such as "duty and honor". A rich vocabulary and a very particular rhythm made of small sentences and numerous repetitions gives the Italian tone to this novel yet very American. The author uses the words brilliantly for descriptions, especially fights, and modifies his style according to the nationality and character of the characters. It is a well researched novel, a powerful novel, a real novel where man finds himself naked face her fears, facing its joys, a modern novel in tone, a great novel! The first pages disturbed me a little, I understood the meaning without understanding the style. I did well to persevere, it is very very well written and the story moved me a lot! Lisbon Book-Fair 2016.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    An American studying architecture in Rome, Frederick Henry, is transformed into a Lt. in the Italian Army, when World War I starts. He volunteers even though America doesn't enter , the Great War, for another 3 years ! Why? He probably can't say, himself , but young men want excitement in their dull lives. He joins the ambulance corps on the northern front , in charge of four drivers , and a few motorcars, picking up the badly wounded soldiers, when feasible, the dead are carried outside the veh An American studying architecture in Rome, Frederick Henry, is transformed into a Lt. in the Italian Army, when World War I starts. He volunteers even though America doesn't enter , the Great War, for another 3 years ! Why? He probably can't say, himself , but young men want excitement in their dull lives. He joins the ambulance corps on the northern front , in charge of four drivers , and a few motorcars, picking up the badly wounded soldiers, when feasible, the dead are carried outside the vehicles , no need now. Austrians are the enemy, but the high snowy mountains, freezing weather , make battles difficult, to fight, swollen rivers dangerous to cross , the artillery flashing in the night, screaming mortars above , and coming down no-one knows where, except the unfortunates, but too late for them. Rinaldi a very capable surgeon in the Italian army , getting better every day, putting back together the wounded bodies, saving lives, most of the time . Is Lt. Henry's affable roommate, always joking, and best friend, in a good house, in a mostly undamaged village, near the war, for officers. A man who loves women, to a certain degree ( lust may be the correct word), he has seen his latest enchanting female, but to his deep regret, not a mutual feeling between the two. The gracious doctor tells the lieutenant about the beautiful blonde, tall British nurse, Catherine Barkley, even introduces him. It doesn't take long for a romance, she lost her fiancee in France, last year, 1916, in the trenches, at first she , then he too falls in love , not wanting or expecting it, her best friend and fellow nurse Helen Ferguson , disapproves. Lonely people amid a terrible conflict somehow require something to continue their joyless existence. Shortly after, while waiting in a ditch at the front, for the bombardment to halt, a mortar shell hits, killing one of his men and badly wounding him, in both legs.The ambulance will take the driver for a ride not in front, this time, but in the back, he the young American, feels a warm liquid dropping from the top, the blood oozing out of another soldier, will not stop, Henry can't move, just endure, until there is no more. The vehicle ceases traveling, heavy rains pouring down, the dead man put on the muddy ground, and another victim carried inside. They finally arrive at the unsanitary field hospital, safely navigating the treacherous mountain roads and bombs. Catherine becomes the Lt.'s nurse and much more. Since Milan, is not far away and an American hospital has just opened (this is 1917), a better place for treatment. Catherine gets assigned there, never a difficulty, she says mysteriously. But the recovered Mr.Henry, must go back to the front when he is healed, their happiness is over. A novel based on Hemingway's experiences in the war, he was a 19 -year old ambulance driver, almost dying of battle wounds, and having an unhappy affair with an older nurse.

  14. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    My second book by Ernest Hemingway. I liked this so much that I cried while finally closing the book. It must be the way Hemingway used his magic: the vivid descriptions of his locale. The war torn Italian picturesque villa and the use of rain as metaphor for hardship. The ying-yang kind of story: the "man's man" virile American Tenente and the whimsical English-woman Catherine. The contrast between these two lovers is so opposite that's akin to the sun and moon that sometimes exist together in a My second book by Ernest Hemingway. I liked this so much that I cried while finally closing the book. It must be the way Hemingway used his magic: the vivid descriptions of his locale. The war torn Italian picturesque villa and the use of rain as metaphor for hardship. The ying-yang kind of story: the "man's man" virile American Tenente and the whimsical English-woman Catherine. The contrast between these two lovers is so opposite that's akin to the sun and moon that sometimes exist together in a dreamy late afternoon sky before everything turns dark. However, in the end, the moon ceased to shine and the sun tried to light up the sky but it was raining and the novel ended sad and the sun, being alone, was still lonely. This image was the reason why I cried. Apart from that sad ending, I also did not enjoy Catherine's delivery of dialogues particularly when she talked to her lover. Their conversations felt like childlike and immature. Also, my edition of this book has so many typographical errors. Paging Arrow Books, the publisher. Please hire a good proofreader. You are doing a great disservice to an otherwise exceptional literary work.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Siria

    I've never read any Hemingway, so I thought to myself, 'Self, that is probably something you should remedy.' And now there are a couple of hours of my life that I will never get back. The macho posturing, the awful dialogue (if it were possible to have excised every word he put into the mouth of Catherine, I would have done so), the misogyny, the sometimes bizarre interactions between people... whatever the hell he was trying to do, for me it read as if everyone was either: 1) Certifiably insane I've never read any Hemingway, so I thought to myself, 'Self, that is probably something you should remedy.' And now there are a couple of hours of my life that I will never get back. The macho posturing, the awful dialogue (if it were possible to have excised every word he put into the mouth of Catherine, I would have done so), the misogyny, the sometimes bizarre interactions between people... whatever the hell he was trying to do, for me it read as if everyone was either: 1) Certifiably insane, 2) an alien with no knowledge of human interaction or 3) a certifiably insane alien with no knowledge of human interaction. A vapid book full of vapid people.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    "Tell me exactly what happened. Did you do any heroic acts?" "No," I said. "I was blown up while we were eating cheese." What can I say that hasn't already been said? Yes, the man/woman stuff is awkward as hell, with all the "Darlings" and "Say you love me" coming off as so much bad movie dialogue. But, I loved hearing all the characters give their opinions on the war. The action sequences are compelling, and frequently disturbing. And, Henry's repartee with Rinaldi is absolutely priceless! Plus, cons "Tell me exactly what happened. Did you do any heroic acts?" "No," I said. "I was blown up while we were eating cheese." What can I say that hasn't already been said? Yes, the man/woman stuff is awkward as hell, with all the "Darlings" and "Say you love me" coming off as so much bad movie dialogue. But, I loved hearing all the characters give their opinions on the war. The action sequences are compelling, and frequently disturbing. And, Henry's repartee with Rinaldi is absolutely priceless! Plus, considering this is a story about war, the book had far more laughs that I was expecting, so here's to you, Papa! I truly enjoyed listening to the audiobook. John Slattery, who is perhaps best known as Roger Sterling from Mad Men, did a fantastic job, and made the book come to life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Ashleigh

    Ernest Hemingway takes a lame story, and then he tells it in a boring way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    A Farewell to Arms sort of gives you the inkling that Hemingway's death will probably involve a shotgun. It's just that sad. Front to back, this is one of the more mournful novels I've read. It's about Henry, an ambulance driver in World War I. He is wounded and falls in love with Catherine, a nurse. They exchange odd banter. They fall in love in love during a summer in Milan (but who wouldn't?). He knocks Catherine up, then returns to the front. Unfortunately for him, he is fighting with Italia A Farewell to Arms sort of gives you the inkling that Hemingway's death will probably involve a shotgun. It's just that sad. Front to back, this is one of the more mournful novels I've read. It's about Henry, an ambulance driver in World War I. He is wounded and falls in love with Catherine, a nurse. They exchange odd banter. They fall in love in love during a summer in Milan (but who wouldn't?). He knocks Catherine up, then returns to the front. Unfortunately for him, he is fighting with Italians, and, as the Italians are known to do, he is soon in full retreat. (I don't know why the French get such a bad rap, the Italians haven't won a war since sacking Carthage). Henry is captured by military police and in danger of being executed, but he manages to escape. He reunites with Catherine and, inexplicably, ends up living with her in Switzerland. Things are idyllic for awhile. The lazy, languid life reminiscent of The Sun Also Rises. Then, of course, life intervenes. The end is tragic. Heartbreaking. The writing is brilliant, such as in Hemingway's famous line about how the world breaks us all: We were never lonely and never afraid when we were together. I know that the night is not the same as the day: that all things are different, that the things of the night cannot be explained in the day, because they do not then exist, and the night can be a dreadful time for lonely people once their loneliness has started. But with Catherine there was almost no difference in the night except that it was an even better time. If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry. There's no cynicism here, just bitterness. It's prototypical Hemingway. The sparseness and terseness interspersed with long, emotion-laden sentences. I place this in the middle of For Whom the Bell Tolls, which ends badly but is full of passion and love, and The Sun Also Rises, which is like an early 20th century The Real World.

  19. 5 out of 5

    emily

    I first read this book in high school. Maybe because I was young, maybe because it was summer reading, or maybe because I read it immediately following The Invisible Man (intense!), I more or less just slid through the book, enjoying the love story and not dwelling long enough in the war episodes to feel much of anything. The second time I read it, I didn't make it past the time in Milan. I couldn't settle into the prose and, more importantly, I couldn't handle Catherine: "I'll say just what you I first read this book in high school. Maybe because I was young, maybe because it was summer reading, or maybe because I read it immediately following The Invisible Man (intense!), I more or less just slid through the book, enjoying the love story and not dwelling long enough in the war episodes to feel much of anything. The second time I read it, I didn't make it past the time in Milan. I couldn't settle into the prose and, more importantly, I couldn't handle Catherine: "I'll say just what you wish and I'll do what you wish and then you will never want any other girls, will you?" Gah. I couldn't accept either Catherine or her relationship with Frederick as at all real, and because I assumed they were supposed to be not only real but also good (or pure or ideal or something like that), it completely turned me off the book. This time I read Catherine and Frederick (especially Catherine) as damaged and completely desperate, which made her and the love story believable, acceptable, and very sad. A friend called their repetitive dialogue (“I have a fine life”, “I have a fine time” “Don’t we have a fine life?”) an ‘incantation’, like they’re trying to will their life into being. I find that moving. The love story still wasn’t my favorite part of the book, however. This time I found myself dwelling more on the war episodes, especially the army’s retreat. Something about the terse style and the mundane details (what they’re eating, etc.) makes it more brutal.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    This book is incredible. I completely understand why it is a classic. Hemingway is a masterful writer. There is so much to absolutely love about this novel. Hemingway paints the landscape and setting like a painter. Each setting is so beautifully and carefully described, recalling such detail. The humor and wit involved had me laughing aloud. He so articulately characterizes and ascribes characteristics to those within his novel. You can feel the personalities and love them as he must have in cr This book is incredible. I completely understand why it is a classic. Hemingway is a masterful writer. There is so much to absolutely love about this novel. Hemingway paints the landscape and setting like a painter. Each setting is so beautifully and carefully described, recalling such detail. The humor and wit involved had me laughing aloud. He so articulately characterizes and ascribes characteristics to those within his novel. You can feel the personalities and love them as he must have in creating them. They are so alive and vibrant! They have characteristics and personalities we would typically think of per their nationalities. The war is seen as an absolute absurdity from any way you look at it, but he does not go over the top in driving this point home. There is so much else layered within this book. Yes, war is ridiculous. The whole endeavor is ridiculous. Who will win? The country that figures this out last. And the love story.. is to die for!!! It is so crazy at the outset, so real, so tender... so tragic. It has to be one of my favorite literary romances of all time. This fictional novel is told in first person. Frederic Henry is an American studying architecture in Rome when World War I breaks out. He enlists in the Italian army as an ambulance driver, prior to America even entering the war. This mirrors Hemingway’s life in that he too volunteered to be an ambulance driver in the Italian army, years prior to America’s entrance into the war. In the novel, Lieutenant Henry develops close friendships with Rinaldi, an Italian surgeon, and a nameless priest. It is through Rinaldi that Henry meets Catherine Barkley, with whom he falls in love. The war is ensuing with Austria and Germany. The officers of Italian army at the beginning of the novel seem to be enjoying drink and brothels. Henry even develops jaundice during a prolonged hospitalized for a wound to his knee. Alcoholic hepatitis? Possibly. However, as war progresses, the men become demoralized. There is not enough food. They cannot stay dry. They might even be shot by their own army. Lieutenant Henry must navigate his men away from harm during the German attack on Caporetto. In case you have not read this novel and plan to, I will say no more.. as I do not want to ruin the novel for anyone. I listened to the audible version read by John Slattery which I highly recommend. I know prior to this novel being originally published, the profanity was removed. However, in this audio version it seemed like there were gaps where the profanity should have been. I would have preferred to have listened to or read the unedited version. What an amazing book detailing a very important point in history, as well as an incredible love story. This was read as part of Book Riot’s reading challenge as a book that has been banned or frequently challenged in the United States. It has been frequently challenged as a “sex novel” and due to “language and sexual references in the book.” This book was banned in Italy, in 1929 until 1948, by the fascist regime in part for its description of the retreat from Caporetto and in part for its anti-militarism. It was also banned in Boston at that time. It was burned in Germany in 1933 by the Nazis as it was felt to be anti-war as they were trying to drum up support. It was also banned in Ireland in 1939.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I finally read something more from Hemingway besides the damn fish book! For some reason I was prepared to be bored and/or annoyed, but other than some corny period dialogue and a doormat leading lady, I found this to be cynical, suspenseful and poignant. As in war, there can be no happy endings in life, and the catastrophic fall that I felt was coming for these people from very early in the novel came fast and hard and it got to me. In the end I felt as gutted as the aftermath of a battle. That I finally read something more from Hemingway besides the damn fish book! For some reason I was prepared to be bored and/or annoyed, but other than some corny period dialogue and a doormat leading lady, I found this to be cynical, suspenseful and poignant. As in war, there can be no happy endings in life, and the catastrophic fall that I felt was coming for these people from very early in the novel came fast and hard and it got to me. In the end I felt as gutted as the aftermath of a battle. That was what you did. You died. You did not know what it was about. You never had time to learn. They threw you in and told you the rules and the first time they caught you off base they killed you.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrei Tamaş

    "Adio, arme!" este povestea autorului însuşi care, trimis ca "voluntar" pe frontul din Italia (Primul Razboi Mondial), se îndrăgosteşte de o asistentă a Crucii Roşii. Patosul cu care este descrisă iubirea în cea de-a două parte a romanului şi tragicul final al acestuia (care l-a făcut pe Hemingway să se retragă în singurătate) reprezintă o experienţă profundă, o experienţă a cărei urmare a fost încolţirea nimbului artistic. Stilul lui Hemingway este succint şi arareori are fragmente în care să d "Adio, arme!" este povestea autorului însuşi care, trimis ca "voluntar" pe frontul din Italia (Primul Razboi Mondial), se îndrăgosteşte de o asistentă a Crucii Roşii. Patosul cu care este descrisă iubirea în cea de-a două parte a romanului şi tragicul final al acestuia (care l-a făcut pe Hemingway să se retragă în singurătate) reprezintă o experienţă profundă, o experienţă a cărei urmare a fost încolţirea nimbului artistic. Stilul lui Hemingway este succint şi arareori are fragmente în care să descrie stări, lăsând, deci, la latitudinea cititorului să interpreteze incertitudinea trăirilor atât de evidenţiată în scrierile sale. S-a făcut şi un film, "In love and war", doar că e mult modificat subiectul, însă finalul filmului mi se pare mult mai copleşitor decât finalul romanului...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    (Spoilers ahead.) THE DOUBLE DATE Dramatis Personae: Henry, protagonist of A Farewell to Arms, ex-soldier. Catherine, wife of Henry, an ex-nurse for wounded soldiers. Michael, book "reviewer," handsome and devilish rogue. Joy, Michael's wife. She'll cut a bitch. The Waiter, self-explanatory. Distressed Customer #1, Only has one line. Dying Man, just proposed to his girlfriend. Dying Man's Fiance, happy, but frightened her dude will croak before they tie the knot. Harold Bloom, asshole. SCENE 1: The Date Cat (Spoilers ahead.) THE DOUBLE DATE Dramatis Personae: Henry, protagonist of A Farewell to Arms, ex-soldier. Catherine, wife of Henry, an ex-nurse for wounded soldiers. Michael, book "reviewer," handsome and devilish rogue. Joy, Michael's wife. She'll cut a bitch. The Waiter, self-explanatory. Distressed Customer #1, Only has one line. Dying Man, just proposed to his girlfriend. Dying Man's Fiance, happy, but frightened her dude will croak before they tie the knot. Harold Bloom, asshole. SCENE 1: The Date Catherine: Oh, Henry, I do so love you, and I hope you don't tire of me. I'm going to do my best to be a good wife for you. I am doing well, aren't I? Henry: You couldn't be doing better, my love. I can't imagine what I'd do without you. Joy: Pardon me while I puke under the table. Michael: Try not to get any on my shoes. Waiter: Could I interest you in any appetizers? Michael: Sure. What kind of animals are in your sausage? Waiter: Ummm . . . I'm not sure, but I can check. Joy: No, don't worry about it; we'll have the queso dip. Catherine: Order for me, Henry, I want whatever we choose to please you. Henry: Okay. We'll have two more bourbons and the chicken fingers. Joy: *looking at Catherine, makes whipping noise, and does the accompanying arm gesture.* Catherine: What does that mean? That thing you just did? Joy: Thing I just did? Whatever do you mean? Catherine: You went. . . *makes whipping noise, does the accompanying arm gesture* Joy: I most certainly did not, and I don't know what something like that would mean. Catherine: Well, I'm confident I saw you do it. Joy: I had a thing on my arm. I was shaking it off. Maybe I sneezed at the same time, I can't remember. Henry: It was good of you to invite us on this double date. I've just returned from the war, and I'm glad to be out with friends again. Michael: Don't mention it, Henry, it's my pleasure. I always like having dinner with fictional characters. How is the war going? Henry: Not so well. It's over, actually, and Italy lost. The two of us are living in Switzerland now, getting ready for the baby. Michael: How long will it be? Joy: That's what she said. Michael: *punches Joy in the arm* Joy: *Slaps the side of Michael's head* Henry: Another two weeks. We can't wait. Catherine: We're simply dying for the baby to be born. Joy: *Whispering* Well, that was tasteless. Catherine: What did you say? Joy: Oh, nothing. Catherine: *glaring at Joy* I get the feeling you truly don't like me, Joy. What on earth did I do to you? Joy: You're just so fucking submissive, Catherine! How do you ever expect to be happy if Henry never gets to know the real you? Catherine: What do you mean, the real me? He knows I was a nurse during the war, and that I love him . . . what else is there to know? Michael: But don't you have any hobbies? I mean, do you like French movies? Do you like gardening? Henry: Wait a minute. Why would you require a greater depth of character from my wife than you get from me? I'm not an especially complex person, either. Michael: Well, not especially, but we know you have a fetish for sports, and you dig fishing and stuff. So, that lends a greater realism to your personality than Catherine has. Catherine: *blushing* This is hardly polite conversation. Joy: Sorry, Catherine, but you asked. *The waiter delivers appetizers. They begin eating.* Michael: This is good queso. Good choice, babe. Joy: As usual. Michael: So, you two read any good books lately? Henry: *ignores Michael's question* I object to the way you're talking about my wife. She might not be the most complex person, but she's still admirable: like my own sacrifice--fighting in the war--Catherine is going to make a great sacrifice when. . . well, you know. Catherine: What? Henry: Nothing, dear. Joy: AAAH, so YOU make a sacrifice by voluntarily going off to war. She makes a sacrifice by getting knocked up and dying during childbirth. You defend the country and come home safely, while she dies trying to poop out a baby. Catherine: What? I die during childbirth? Henry: I thought we weren't going to talk about that. Michael: Well, it IS kinda the elephant at the dinner table. Henry: We both show equal courage in the face of hopeless adversity, and neither one of us have a false sense of optimism! Harold Bloom, from the next table over: I'm sorry, but NOBODY would say that. That's just bad dialogue. Michael: Fuck off, Harold. Go find some Dickens to stroke off to. Harold: Well, I never. . . Joy: Yeah. Go pick your wick. And, in response to your unrealistic dialogue, Henry, here's what I think: she might be brave, but she only does three things, really: take care of wounded men, love a man, and have a baby. You and half the lit crits in the world can try to convince yourself that she's a 'feminist' character in some context, but it's like when Intelligent Design people try to re-explain scientific findings so they'll agree with a predetermined worldview. Michael: THAT'S realistic dialogue. Henry: Oh, god, do we have to talk about politics? Catherine: Why not? We've already talked about how I'm going to f______ die! Michael: It's the year 2010 now. You don't need to censor your swearing anymore. Henry: Good. You two are cocksuckers. Michael: Do you wanna walk out of here or get carried out, soldier boy? Henry: Try me. Just try me. Distressed customer #1, from across the restuarant : Help! Help! Is there a cynic in the house? *All four characters raise their hands.* Michael: I've been waiting my whole life for that to happen. *Henry rushes toward the distressed patrons, but Joy trips him and pushes him down. The other three rush over to find a customer hyperventilating on the floor.* Dying Customer's Fiance: He just proposed to me, and when I said yes, he started hyperventillating! I think he's on the verge of dying from sheer happiness! Michael: What is this world coming to? Catherine: Don't be so happy. You'll inevitably give away your youth, vigor and passion as a sacrifice for the generation coming after you. And YOU *pointing at the fiance* just be careful about using birth control. Joy: *crouches over the dying man* And, anyway, women are genetically designed to seek out other potential mates once they've found a man to take care of their children, so she'll probably cheat on you with every bad boy she meets. Michael: Not to mention, even if things somehow work out, what do you have left? Fifty, sixty years? And that's counting all those shitty years, where one of you will be living in a nursing home and dragging around a colostomy bag, wondering why the hell your grandkids aren't visiting. And that's the LUCKY one of you who doesn't die first. Honestly, buddy, you're probably gonna die in your mid-seventies, then SHE'LL head off to the nursing home, and maybe meet some hot old guy who she had an affair with twenty years ago, get remarried, and that old fucker will inherit all your money. Dying Man: *stops hyperventillating, starts crying* Dying Man's Fiance: Thank you so much! You saved him! Dying Man: I'm not sure this marriage is a good idea. SCENE 2: Awakening Michael: *Wakes up with a start* Wow. That was a weird dream. Even weirder than the one where I was obsessed with buying Hot Wheels cars. Joy: *Wakes up with a groan* Shut up or leave the bedroom. Michael: *Rolling over.* If you were nice all the time, I don't think I could handle it. Joy: Don't worry; I won't be. Michael: Goodnight. Joy: 'Night. *Michael and Joy fall back asleep.*

  24. 3 out of 5

    نعیمه بخشی

    اگر فیلم سخیف Silver Linings Playbook را دیده باشید، یادتان هست که شخصیت اصلی فیلم ساعتها و ساعتها همین کتاب را میخواند و بعد که تمام میشود با گفتن جملهای که آوردنش در اینجا خوشایند نیست، کتاب را از پنجره پرت میکند بیرون. من از آنجا یادم بود که کتاب پایان تلخی دارد. ولی برخلاف شخصیت اصلی فیلم مشکلم پایانهی داستان نیست و حتا فکر میکنم این پایانه خیلی هم درخشان است. در بین تمام کتابهایی که دربارهی جنگ خواندهام کتاب وداع با اسلحه نمیتواند جایگاه منحصربهفردی داشته باشد. بگذارید بهتان بگویم که در یک رت اگر فیلم سخیف Silver Linings Playbook را دیده باشید، یادتان هست که شخصیت اصلی فیلم ساعت‌ها و ساعت‌ها همین کتاب را می‌خواند و بعد که تمام می‌شود با گفتن جمله‌ای که آوردنش در این‌جا خوشایند نیست، کتاب را از پنجره پرت می‌کند بیرون. من از آن‌جا یادم بود که کتاب پایان تلخی دارد. ولی برخلاف شخصیت اصلی فیلم مشکلم پایانه‌ی داستان نیست و حتا فکر می‌کنم این پایانه‌ خیلی هم درخشان است. در بین تمام کتاب‌هایی که درباره‌ی جنگ خواند‌ه‌ام کتاب وداع با اسلحه نمی‌تواند جایگاه منحصربه‌فردی داشته باشد. بگذارید بهتان بگویم که در یک رتبه‌بندی منصفانه این کتاب چندین پله پایین‌تر از کتاب‌های هاینریش بل قرار می‌گیرد. فارغ از تکنیک و فرم داستان، رمان زیادی کند پیش می‌رود و انرژی کمی دارد. جنگ آن‌قدری که به راوی نزدیک است، به خواننده نزدیک نیست. و او را چندان که از واقعیت جنگ برمی‌آید، تحت‌تاثیر قرار نمی‌دهد.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    "British ambulance drivers were killed sometimes. Well, I knew I would not be killed. Not in this war. It did not have anything to do with me. It seemed no more dangerous to me myself than war in the movies. I wished to God it was over though." Frederic Henry (who, for all intents and purposes is Ernest Hemingway) is a volunteer in the Italian Army in World War I. He's wounded in battle and has to spend time recuperating in a hospital after his leg is operated on, and while there he falls in love "British ambulance drivers were killed sometimes. Well, I knew I would not be killed. Not in this war. It did not have anything to do with me. It seemed no more dangerous to me myself than war in the movies. I wished to God it was over though." Frederic Henry (who, for all intents and purposes is Ernest Hemingway) is a volunteer in the Italian Army in World War I. He's wounded in battle and has to spend time recuperating in a hospital after his leg is operated on, and while there he falls in love with British nurse Catherine Barkley. The novel follows them as they try to escape the war and start a life together. On the surface, this isn't really a book about war; it's a book about two people just trying to live a normal, happy life while the whole world goes to hell around them. I was lukewarm on this one. For Whom the Bell Tolls is much better, first because it's about something bigger than just two people trying to get married (Robert Jordan struggled with the concept of heroism and how war changes people; Frederick Henry just wants to get laid), and also because the characters in A Farewell to Arms are significantly less complex and interesting than the ones in For Whom the Bell Tolls. Also, Catherine Barkley is just an absolute nightmare of a character - she has no discernible personality and exists just to gratify and worship Henry, to the extent that she makes Bella Swan look like an independent strong woman overflowing with self-esteem. Think I'm exaggerating? Here, have some lines of actual dialogue that Catherine says to Henry: "I'll say just what you wish and I'll do what you wish and then you will never want any other girls, will you?" "I want what you want. There isn't any more. Just what you want." "I'm good. Aren't I good?" "You see? I'm good. I do what you want." Christ on a bike. That all happens in one single scene, by the way. Catherine isn't a person, she's a horrible Frankenstein's monster stitched together from desperation and male wish fulfillment. To Hemingway's credit, Henry really does love Catherine, so at least we can take comfort in the fact that her senseless devotion was reciprocated a little bit (not that Henry ever talks about his feelings with the same intensity that Catherine does, because that'd be gay). The reason this gets three stars instead of two is because Hemingway is still Hemingway, and amidst all the bad characterization and plodding pace he manages to create these little bits of gorgeous writing that make everything okay, at least for a little while: "Often a man wishes to be alone and a girl wishes to be alone too and if they love each other they are jealous of that in each other, but I can truly say we never felt that. We could feel alone when we were together, alone against the others. It has only happened to me like that once. I have been alone while I was with many girls and that is the way you can be most lonely. But we were never lonely and never afraid when we were together. I know that night is not the same as the day: that all things different, that the things of the night cannot be explained in the day, because they do not then exist, and the night can be a dreadful time for lonely people once their loneliness has started. But with Catherine there was almost no difference in the night except that it was an even better time."

  26. 3 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Observational tragedy. Bloke falls for sub-moron during war. *petitions friendly bombs* Hemmingway absolves language of beauty. And then the world. His intent was to expose war's mundanity. His method rendered art menial. *sarcastic applause*

  27. 5 out of 5

    Roy Lotz

    There were many words that you could not stand to hear and finally only the names of places had dignity. If Voltaire had read Hemingway’s famous war novel, I’d wager that he would pronounce that it is neither about war nor a novel. Compared to All Quiet on the Western Front, for example, the descriptions of war in this book are ludicrously tame. The vast majority of the time the narrator is not even at the front; and when he is, he is far behind the front lines, driving an ambulance. The bulk o There were many words that you could not stand to hear and finally only the names of places had dignity. If Voltaire had read Hemingway’s famous war novel, I’d wager that he would pronounce that it is neither about war nor a novel. Compared to All Quiet on the Western Front, for example, the descriptions of war in this book are ludicrously tame. The vast majority of the time the narrator is not even at the front; and when he is, he is far behind the front lines, driving an ambulance. The bulk of the book is taken up, instead, by a love story. The war forms the backdrop—though admittedly a very conspicuous backdrop—and is not the main thread of the book. What of the novel? Hemingway is a writer of conspicuous strengths and weaknesses; and the longer the book, the more apparent his shortcomings. Though the novel is slim, it still feels padded. Hemingway, for whatever reason, considered it dramatically necessary to narrate every time his characters ate or drank. Aside from telling us that his characters drank a lot (even while pregnant) and appreciated good wines, we learn very little from these frequent repasts, and the ultimate effect is to make the reader hungry. The conversations, too, are repetitive—especially between the narrator and Catherine Barkley, his wartime sweetheart. While strikingly tender and frank, especially for Hemingway, the relationship between these two never sparkles with the interplay of personality. There is none of the mutual discovery we find in, say, Jane Eyre and Mr. Rochester. Instead, the two of them talk to each other the way people talk to their dogs—asking cutesie rhetorical questions never meant to be answered. These two examples are just part of a larger fault: Hemingway’s tendency to get carried away into nostalgic, atmospheric descriptions. At his best moments, admittedly, he creates that wistful, bittersweet, melancholic tone that he is known for, and that forms such a beautiful part of his work. But too often the book becomes pointlessly autobiographical. Hemingway is, after all, one of the strongest proponents of the “write what you know” school of fiction. Though wise advice, there is a danger to this method: Since everyone’s life is interesting to themselves, it can be difficult to know which parts may be interesting to other people. This book definitely suffers in this way. Of course there are many strong bits. Some scenes are unforgettable—the narrator’s injury, the long retreat, rowing across the Swiss Lake, among others. I also really loved the conversations between the narrator and Rinanldi. Unlike the love story, that friendship has true chemistry. Indeed many episodes, taken by themselves, are remarkable. But do they add up to a coherent book? I ask this specifically in regards to the ending. Since I had just read A.C. Bradley’s book on tragedy, in which he insisted that tragedy requires that a hero create his own downfall, I was struck by how un-tragic was the end of this book. The fatal stroke is not the inevitable result of any personal flaw or a misguided decision, but pure misfortune. The final effect, therefore, is not tragic, but pathetic. In Hemingway’s novel, the universe itself is malevolent, even sadistic, and humans just confused defenseless creatures caught in its maw. Thus I am a bit perplexed that some people see this as an anti-war novel. The narrator’s crushing blow is not caused by the war; indeed it is something that could have happened to anyone. You can argue that the novel’s bleak atmosphere reflects the fatalism and the pessimism engendered by the war: a nihilistic perspective that is carried over into every phase of life—even love. Yet the narrator himself is not pessimistic—at least not most of the time; if he were, he would not have embarked on his love-affair. It is neither his perspective nor the war, therefore, that dooms the narrator, but some mysterious malevolency of the world itself that makes lasting happiness impossible, in war or in peace. Thus, aside from a few explicitly anti-war passages in the book, the general tenor has little to do with pacifism or any other political reflection. Instead, to paraphrase the book’s most famous passage, the final message is: Everyone gets broken in the end no matter what. And I don’t think this notion has any truth or value.

  28. 3 out of 5

    Jean-Marc Bonet

    There is something so fulfilling in Mr Hemingway's achievement in 'A Farewell to Arms' that one is left speculating as to whether another novel will follow in this manner, and whether it does not complete both a period and a phase. The story begins with such beautiful mannerisms which is a subtle way to undertake a book where the centre stage is that of war, with the love-making between the young American hero, Henry, a volunteer in the Italian Ambulance Service, and Catherine Barkley, an English There is something so fulfilling in Mr Hemingway's achievement in 'A Farewell to Arms' that one is left speculating as to whether another novel will follow in this manner, and whether it does not complete both a period and a phase. The story begins with such beautiful mannerisms which is a subtle way to undertake a book where the centre stage is that of war, with the love-making between the young American hero, Henry, a volunteer in the Italian Ambulance Service, and Catherine Barkley, an English nurse in the British hospital at Goritzia. There is sublime feminine quality in her response to the man, who, at first, is just amusing himself, but the affair soon develops into real passion. Henry, whose good relations with the Italian officers in his mess are drawn with delightful freshness, is wounded, with a smashed knee in a night assault near Plava, and is sent down from the field hospital to the American hospital at Milan, where he is the first case, and here Miss Barkley gets a transfer to nurse him. All the descriptions of life at the front and in the hospitals, the talk of the officers, privates, and doctors, are crisply natural and make a convincing narrative, though the hero is perhaps already a little too mature and experienced. Catherine (who might be a younger sister of the heroine of Fiesta) is most skilfully modelled as the eternal soul in nursing dress. During moments spend in the Milan hospital, where love laughs at matrons and maids, the author increases his hold over us, and spells out that even with our worse fears the compassion of others can sometimes be enough to give hope in the darkest of days. The story appears to deepen in force when Henry, patched up, returns to the Isonzo front. The year has been a serious one for the Italian army, and the breakthrough of the Germans at Caporetto brings disaster. The last 50 pages of book three describe the Italian army in retreat, the block of transport on the main roads, the bogging and abandonment of Henry's cars on a side road, the Italian privates' behaviour and their hatred of the war, and finally the shooting of the elderly officers in retreat by the Italian battle police at the Tagliamento - these pages are masterly and devastating. The American hero escapes death by diving into the river and, later, arrest by concealing himself in a gun truck till it reaches Milan. Thence in mufti he gets to Stiesa and meets Catherine, and the lovers escape to Switzerland by a long night row up the lake. The scenes on the Italian plains hold more atmospheric truth than those of the mountain roads, but all are admirably wrought. The impartiality of the presentation of war is as remarkable as the sincerity of the record of love passion. With remorseless artistic instinct Mr Hemingway proceeds to match the horrors of human slaughter by his final chapter of Catherine's agony and death as, "a maternity case". Here he rises to his highest pitch, for Catherine's blotting-out is but complementary to the massacre of the millions on the fronts. Henry's coolness of observation in its detailed actuality is perhaps too stressed in the last pages, for in hours of great emotional strain material fact seems to detach itself as a separate phenomenon, and Henry remains too set; but the author's method prevails and triumphs in the last line. Hemingway's masterpiece, that touches in so many ways.

  29. 3 out of 5

    James

    This is the story of an American serving as a non-combatant ambulance driver in the Italian army during the Great War, the injury he suffered, his lengthy convalescence, relationships and experiences of that war. A story which is inspired by (at least in part) if not exactly portraying Hemingway’s own experiences fulfilling the same role. Apparently this was a period which Hemingway viewed as one of the most formative experiences of his life. This is the only Hemingway that I have read thus far a This is the story of an American serving as a non-combatant ambulance driver in the Italian army during the Great War, the injury he suffered, his lengthy convalescence, relationships and experiences of that war. A story which is inspired by (at least in part) if not exactly portraying Hemingway’s own experiences fulfilling the same role. Apparently this was a period which Hemingway viewed as one of the most formative experiences of his life. This is the only Hemingway that I have read thus far and chose this one as I’d understood that ‘Farewell to Arms’ was generally viewed as Hemingway at the ‘height of his literary powers’. That being the case, I had cautiously high expectations – unfortunately most of which were not fulfilled. The book I found to be generally and unfortunately disappointing on most fronts. I struggled to engage with the narrative or (for the most part) the characters. The prose I found to be generally verging on the disinteresting. Maybe it is a lazy comparison, but ‘Farewell to Arms’ came across to me almost like an earlier, weaker Steinbeck – but without his literary strengths, mastery and skill for storytelling. The most effective and compelling parts of ‘Farewell to Arms’ I found to be the relationships and scenes between Henry, Catherine, Rinaldi and the Priest – these at least had a certain air of authenticity about them (in spite of Catherine’s occasionally bizarre depiction as ‘half-crazy’) as well as the closing passages – which in themselves existed as the result of the war, but in themselves are depicted as entirely separate from the war. If there was any semblance of portraying the heroism, futility and savagery etc of war then this was for the most part lost or absent – at least for me. Published in the same year as Remarque’s ‘All Quiet on the Western Front’ (sometimes cited as the ‘best war novel of all time’ – understandably) – ‘Farewell to Arms’ does not bear comparison and maybe shouldn’t be compared. Although both books were published in the same year and the broader subject matter of the Great War is the same – they don’t attempt to tell anything like the same story. However… whilst Remarque produced a staggering work of literary near/genius, Hemingway came up with a novel which is considered altogether more ‘modern’ in style and construction. The problem for me is that ‘A Farewell to Arms’ is ultimately neither moving, nor beautiful, nor harrowing, nor engaging, nor for the most part thought provoking. Perhaps Hemingway readers out there can recommend some of his other works which might restore my hopes in Hemingway; based on ‘Farewell to Arms’ however, I do not feel inclined at this stage to explore the rest of his output. Apparently the title; ‘Farewell to Arms’ is in itself a pun – although I think neither funny, nor clever nor ironic – perhaps I missed something? Overall then – despite some engaging and effective passages, some memorable quotes and possibly ahead of its time terms of being ‘modern’ (?) – ‘Farewell to Arms’ is ultimately however, underwhelming, fails to engage and for the most part lacks a sense and feeling of any real authenticity. I've generously given a three star rating...only just.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nood-Lesse

    La saggezza dei vecchi è una leggenda. Non diventano saggi, diventano solo prudenti Che stranezza la rilettura di questo libro. Dentro ci sono delle cose che avevo dimenticato, loro invece non si sono mai scordate di me. La pagina di cui parlavo nel precedente commento è ancora al suo posto. Per quella pagina cinque stelle sono poche, va aggiunta una cometa. Al libro non le avrei assegnate se questa fosse stata la prima lettura. Le confermo solo perché mi è vissuto dentro a mia insaputa. La prima La saggezza dei vecchi è una leggenda. Non diventano saggi, diventano solo prudenti Che stranezza la rilettura di questo libro. Dentro ci sono delle cose che avevo dimenticato, loro invece non si sono mai scordate di me. La pagina di cui parlavo nel precedente commento è ancora al suo posto. Per quella pagina cinque stelle sono poche, va aggiunta una cometa. Al libro non le avrei assegnate se questa fosse stata la prima lettura. Le confermo solo perché mi è vissuto dentro a mia insaputa. La prima parte è assai lenta, altrove c'è un uso eccessivo del discorso diretto (di cui H. è l'indiscusso sovrano). La storia d’amore è senza scaramucce, Hemingway deve aver pensato che l’orrore della guerra fosse sufficiente come contro altare, inoltre c’è il fatto che quella storia condurrà in un punto preciso. Non ricordavo il finale, ma ho rivissuto uno stato d’animo. Ho scoperto che alcune di quelle parole mi si erano conficcate dentro. Non avete mai letto niente di E.H.? Mi verrebbe da consigliarvi di partire con l’introduzione a questo libro (che lui scrisse nel 1948) per capire se è un autore che può fare per voi Il fatto che la materia del libro fosse tragica non mi rendeva infelice, perché ero sicuro che la vita è una tragedia e finisce sempre allo stesso modo. Ma il vedere sempre in modo nuovo che era possibile creare qualcosa, tanto veridicamente da ricavarne felicità nel leggere gli effetti della creazione, e ritornare a farlo tutti i giorni di lavoro mi dava un piacere superiore agli altri che avevo già conosciuto… Il libro fu riscritto nell'autunno e nell'inverno 1928 a Key West e questa nuova stesura fu conclusa a Parigi nella primavera 1929. Mentre lavoravo alla prima stesura nacque il mio secondo figlio Patrick, a Kansas city, mediante taglio cesareo, e intanto che la rifacevo mio padre si uccise a Oak Park (Illinois). Non avevo ancora compiuto i trent'anni quando terminai il libro, e uscì nel giorno del crollo in borsa. Ho pensato sempre che mio padre avrebbe potuto aspettare fino a quel giorno, ma forse aveva fretta. Non voglio mettermi qui a far il giudice perché volevo molto bene a mio padre. Per una coincidenza ho letto di recente queste parole di Malamud Per certi scrittori diventa difficile scrivere quando sono a fine ormai alla fine della carriera, specialmente se decidono di escludere elementi importanti legati alla loro esperienza personale. Hemingway non riusciva a parlare della famiglia se non attraverso rapidi accenni.. Ovviamente non tutto ciò che accade nella vita di uno scrittore deve divenire materia di narrazione, ma sono dell’idea che, se Hemingway avesse cercato, diciamo negli ultimi cinque anni della sua vita, di raccontare di suo padre, invece di continuare a parlare di tori o di un grosso pesce, magari non si sarebbe suicidato In ‘Addio alle armi’ l’unico accenno al padre è questo E tu? Hai ancora il papà? - No - risposi. - Solo un patrigno. - Credi che andremmo d'accordo? - Oh, anche tu potrai fare a meno di lui. Infine un’annotazione per lo scrittore che, diventato mito, ha reso mitiche numerose delle cose che ha toccato. M'incamminai verso l'Iles Borromèes, con la valigia, sotto la pioggia. Vidi una carrozza e feci segno al vetturino, perché era meglio d'arrivare in carrozza. Ci fermammo dopo aver attraversato il giardino, il portiere uscì con l'ombrello e fu molto gentile. Mi accompagnò in una bella stanza, molto ampia, con le finestre sul lago. http://www.borromees.it/ Camere: HEMINGWAY SUITE ------1994----- Io vi consiglio di leggerlo "Addio alle armi" perché nessuna recensione gli renderà mai giustizia. Vi è scritto di dolore e amore, di amicizia e di guerra, della vita, lontano dalle favole buoniste troppo spesso raccontate dal cinema americano. Un informazione valida? Fra la pagina 250 e quella 300 ce n'é una che da sola vale il prezzo del libro.

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