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Go, Dog. Go!

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Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question “Do you like my hat?” Like P. D. Eastman’s classic Are You My Mother? Go, Dog. Go! has been a go-to favorite for over fif Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question “Do you like my hat?” Like P. D. Eastman’s classic Are You My Mother? Go, Dog. Go! has been a go-to favorite for over fifty years, leaving audiences of all breeds wagging their tails with delight. Originally created by Dr. Seuss, Beginner Books encourage children to read all by themselves, with simple words and illustrations that give clues to their meaning.  "The canine cartoons make an elementary text funny and coherent and still one of the best around."--School Library Journal. 


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Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question “Do you like my hat?” Like P. D. Eastman’s classic Are You My Mother? Go, Dog. Go! has been a go-to favorite for over fif Reading goes to the dogs in this timeless Beginner Book edited by Dr. Seuss. From big dogs and little dogs to red, green, and blue dogs, dogs going up and dogs going fast . . . who knew dogs were so busy? And laughter will ensue at the repeated question “Do you like my hat?” Like P. D. Eastman’s classic Are You My Mother? Go, Dog. Go! has been a go-to favorite for over fifty years, leaving audiences of all breeds wagging their tails with delight. Originally created by Dr. Seuss, Beginner Books encourage children to read all by themselves, with simple words and illustrations that give clues to their meaning.  "The canine cartoons make an elementary text funny and coherent and still one of the best around."--School Library Journal. 

30 review for Go, Dog. Go!

  1. 3 out of 5

    Patrick

    I know this is a classic and all, but I had a hard time making it through this book. It's full of needless repetition, which makes it longer than it needs to be. What's more, the plot is a mess, leaping from event to event almost randomly at times. I respect what the author is attempting to do here, thematically. Eastman is asking bold questions about how things are related to one another. Are we a green dog or a yellow one? Is it day or night? These are big questions, and they need to be asked. I know this is a classic and all, but I had a hard time making it through this book. It's full of needless repetition, which makes it longer than it needs to be. What's more, the plot is a mess, leaping from event to event almost randomly at times. I respect what the author is attempting to do here, thematically. Eastman is asking bold questions about how things are related to one another. Are we a green dog or a yellow one? Is it day or night? These are big questions, and they need to be asked. That said, you can have a book that contains big ideas AND an interesting story too. And, unfortunately, the story is severely lacking here. The one saving grace of the book was the "Do you like my hat?" subplot, which was very tight in its execution and satisfying in its resolution. Ultimately, when reading a book like this, the question you have to ask yourself is "Would I buy the sequel?" And I have to say, with some regret, that I wouldn't. There were just too many structural problems with the story for that. * * * Seriously though, I had a great time reading this book with my little boy. Lots of basic words used in different situations make it a great tool. If I was still teaching ESL students, I would use this to clue in struggling students about prepositions. (If you think prepositions are easy, it's only because you're a native speaker. Try explaining to someone from Japan why you get *in* a car but *on* a train.) As a bonus, this book is long. Most kids books seem to be about 20 pages these days, but this is pretty easily triple that. It makes it less of a mind-numbing experience when you end up reading it a couple times. P.S. I meant what I said about the hat subplot. Genius.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Rappelt

    Truly, nothing has captured the scope of emotion that encompasses Romance such as Go Dog. Go! Part tragedy, part romantic comedy this is a love story for the ages. With such memorable wit and dialog such as the belly laugh inducing "Do you like my hat?" and the heart wrenching reply, "No I do not." You will laugh, and you'll cry. It's not all romance though, the book deftly weaves in several subplots which serve as complex metaphors for various political and philosophical debates. For example, t Truly, nothing has captured the scope of emotion that encompasses Romance such as Go Dog. Go! Part tragedy, part romantic comedy this is a love story for the ages. With such memorable wit and dialog such as the belly laugh inducing "Do you like my hat?" and the heart wrenching reply, "No I do not." You will laugh, and you'll cry. It's not all romance though, the book deftly weaves in several subplots which serve as complex metaphors for various political and philosophical debates. For example, there is a seen in which "The dogs go to sleep. They will sleep all night." is clearly an *obvious* metaphor for female hegemony towards the oppressive male dominated society of the early Mad Men era 1960's in which this book takes place. In other portions of the book it explores how the effects of how economic success and failure in the brewing industry plays out among moderate Democratic congressmen, for example "The blue dog is in. The red dog is out. (Clearly a throwback to Prohibitionist sentiment and history.) At it's climax, Go, Dog. Go! explores how runaway consumerism, and out-of-control automobile industry have set American society on a one way path to self annihilation. Not even the power of the newly formed Green Movement can help society. The Green Movement(here symbolized by a Giant Tree), is consumed and polluted by society in a hedonistic Tree-Dog-Party. In the end we are teased with one ray of hope, as the male and female protagonists escape this debauchery together, their budding romance at long last blossomed, providing hope that someday through the verisimilitude of their mutual affection a new generation will be born that can overcome the pettiness of their forefathers, and set society on the path to salvation.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Archit Ojha

    Fantastic illustrations. Good for teaching children about numbers and colors. Hilariously humorous at few points. Do you like my hat? I do not!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kazbot

    Go Dog Go is an exciting tale about a dog on his journey through life. It encompasses all of the major obstacles we confront in our modern western society from his first period to a heart attack at thirty. Most of the text requires use of a dictionary however if you have an internet connection available then looking up the more obscure words becomes a snap. Overall, I found the overarching message of this masterpiece insightful and full of ethically sound judgments. I would without question reco Go Dog Go is an exciting tale about a dog on his journey through life. It encompasses all of the major obstacles we confront in our modern western society from his first period to a heart attack at thirty. Most of the text requires use of a dictionary however if you have an internet connection available then looking up the more obscure words becomes a snap. Overall, I found the overarching message of this masterpiece insightful and full of ethically sound judgments. I would without question recommend this book to anyone looking for a critical self examination of one's self and or a substitute for toilet paper.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Since the school year started, I've been forced to read this to (or, more accurately, read along with) my daughter...about 4 million times. Ok. Maybe I'm exaggerating. She's a BIG girl now, so they have to read for 15 minutes every day after school, which I think is GREAT! Except for the part where I have to listen to this story, and others like it, for the rest of the school year. Yes, the end result (hopefully, a literate child) is totally worth it. And for whatever reason, Go, Dog. Go! has become Since the school year started, I've been forced to read this to (or, more accurately, read along with) my daughter...about 4 million times. Ok. Maybe I'm exaggerating. She's a BIG girl now, so they have to read for 15 minutes every day after school, which I think is GREAT! Except for the part where I have to listen to this story, and others like it, for the rest of the school year. Yes, the end result (hopefully, a literate child) is totally worth it. And for whatever reason, Go, Dog. Go! has become her favorite choice for this assignment. The great thing about this one is the repetitive use of sight words that every kid needs to be able to quickly recognize. For that reason alone, this thing is worth its weight in gold for beginning readers. Then, of course, it has wacky dogs doing wacky dog things. Can't go wrong with that, can you? Not if you're a kid! My favorite part of the book is the Two Dogs and the Hat stuff. No, it's not exactly comedy gold, but my daughter always does this funny little high-pitched voice for the girl dog, and a low (which still sounds squeaky coming from her) manly voice for the boy dog. It's adorable. Then again, I'm probably just biased. If you've got a little kid who's learning how to read, go get this sucker. Sure, you'll be ready to tear your hair out after a few readings, but they'll love it. It's called sacrifice. Now suck it up, and grab this for your kid.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Matt

    Neo literally sped through this book, leaving no word unpronounced or page unturned. Dogs are all over zooming around town in cars, sometimes obeying traffic laws, but also hard-pressed to listen. They congregate together in parks and on the outskirts of town, reds with blacks, greens, and blues. There is no rhyme or reason, but there sure are dogs. Neo loved this one, even after he told me that he’s read this book at school many times, so he knew all the words. Still, it was a fast-paced story Neo literally sped through this book, leaving no word unpronounced or page unturned. Dogs are all over zooming around town in cars, sometimes obeying traffic laws, but also hard-pressed to listen. They congregate together in parks and on the outskirts of town, reds with blacks, greens, and blues. There is no rhyme or reason, but there sure are dogs. Neo loved this one, even after he told me that he’s read this book at school many times, so he knew all the words. Still, it was a fast-paced story for us both to enjoy!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    A fantastic colorful book filled with wonderful illustrations and little sub-stories. It stimulates a child's imagination while teaching him numbers, colours and social skills. How about the child is counting the dogs in the bed and the ones underneath the bed. Or seeing all the things the dogs are doing in their treetop party-the big dogs, little dogs, yellow, red, blue, pink and green dogs. This will be great fun for any child aged 4-8 , and will not only be educational , but it is something she wil A fantastic colorful book filled with wonderful illustrations and little sub-stories. It stimulates a child's imagination while teaching him numbers, colours and social skills. How about the child is counting the dogs in the bed and the ones underneath the bed. Or seeing all the things the dogs are doing in their treetop party-the big dogs, little dogs, yellow, red, blue, pink and green dogs. This will be great fun for any child aged 4-8 , and will not only be educational , but it is something she will remember for the rest of her life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    When I first met Erika, for some long forgotten reason and situation, someone said, "Do you like my hat?" I answered: "No. I do not." There was an awkward pause and I added, "Good-bye. Good-bye again," with some totally bizarre, guttural, kiddie voice. It became a fun inside joke for Erika and me, but for the life of us, we couldn't remember where it came from. It sounded familiar; it didn't sound me-invented, but we couldn't place it. Then we had babes, and I picked up a bunch of board books -- When I first met Erika, for some long forgotten reason and situation, someone said, "Do you like my hat?" I answered: "No. I do not." There was an awkward pause and I added, "Good-bye. Good-bye again," with some totally bizarre, guttural, kiddie voice. It became a fun inside joke for Erika and me, but for the life of us, we couldn't remember where it came from. It sounded familiar; it didn't sound me-invented, but we couldn't place it. Then we had babes, and I picked up a bunch of board books -- and there it was. "Hello!" "Hello!" "Do you like my hat?" "I do not." "Good-by." "Good-by." It wasn't quite how I remembered it, not quite the way my mind had twisted it over all those years, but we had finally found the source, and we were stoked. 5 years later my boy is reading it to me. It is a great book to foster reading , but even if I didn't have a prior bond with the book beyond learning to read, I would still love Go Dog. Go because of my son. It is a fave. No question.

  9. 3 out of 5

    Miriam Axel-lute

    All of the plotlessness and pointlessness of One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish but none of the wild creativity or language play. I mean, I know an easy reader needs to have simple language, but there are tons of books that manage that without being this insipid. And why oh why does the female dog have to win the approval of the male dog by changing her hat, until they ride off into the sunset at the end when he finally likes her hat? I could go on. I wouldn't even bother to comment on this, exce All of the plotlessness and pointlessness of One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish but none of the wild creativity or language play. I mean, I know an easy reader needs to have simple language, but there are tons of books that manage that without being this insipid. And why oh why does the female dog have to win the approval of the male dog by changing her hat, until they ride off into the sunset at the end when he finally likes her hat? I could go on. I wouldn't even bother to comment on this, except it's a "classic" and that scares me.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Pooja

    The following lines from the book made it too cute. "Do you like my hat?" "I do not."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stein

    what a read - what a book. i'll try and finish it up this year.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    A great book for children to learn about their world on a bit wider scope, with opposite and colours that are not presented in the usual way. With plenty of colourful illustrations for the younger children to enjoy.

  13. 3 out of 5

    Jessica

    A classic! --Do you like my hat? --No, I do not. --Good-bye again. --Good-bye! .... --And now, do you like my hat? [do not want to have to put a spoiler alert! so I'll stop now]

  14. 3 out of 5

    Otis Chandler

    My daughter is loving this. Published in the 60's and one of the best I've found!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: Dogs doing things! I know it isn't really a plot, but the book doesn't really have one. This book uses simple repetition and clear pictures to teach kids about prepositions (under, over, in, on, etc), sizes, and a few other basic concepts. The pictures are funny and have lots of details to talk about with little ones beyond the words on the page. There's a lot of good repeat factor in there because of this. I took this book on a 2-week vacation with my 5-year old and read it almost ev Basic plot: Dogs doing things! I know it isn't really a plot, but the book doesn't really have one. This book uses simple repetition and clear pictures to teach kids about prepositions (under, over, in, on, etc), sizes, and a few other basic concepts. The pictures are funny and have lots of details to talk about with little ones beyond the words on the page. There's a lot of good repeat factor in there because of this. I took this book on a 2-week vacation with my 5-year old and read it almost every night, picking a different page to describe more fully each night. It's also a much longer book than a lot of other picture books designed for kids. It keeps attention, though, reminding us adults that kids can have an attention span beyond a few seconds if the text is worthwhile! A few older-than-me (60-something) campmates seemed quite tickled that this book was still being read. There is a reason why Eastman ranks up with Seuss in staying power of the books written. :) Those books are quality stuff that every child should read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tess Anderson

    i learned what opposites were. i learned that dogs have enormous parties atop trees. i learned that it is "hot out here in the sun" and that it is "not hot here under the house." and most of all, i loved that two page spread of all the dogs in the bed, and that one is lying there with those wide eyes! yeah, i like that dog.

  17. 3 out of 5

    Linda

    This was one of my favorites as a girl, and became a favorite again as I raised two daughters. Fun story, easy vocabulary for little ones, great illustrations, opposites, colors, fast cars, swimming, sleeping, hats and of course (view spoiler)[a dog party in a tree (hide spoiler)] !

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Published in 1961, still awesome. Dogs driving cars in scarves and goggles!

  19. 3 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    A fun children's book, but I just wish that it had been a little bit longer.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Loraine

    My 5 1/2 year old grandson wanted to try reading this book today on his own. The pictures are very supportive and he really enjoyed being able to read most of it on his own. This is a great read aloud book for younger children as they enjoy the crazy antics of all the dogs.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mark Matthews

    This is my all time favorite book to read to my kids, even down to the size of the book. It uses some tricky moves to get children to learn, and its an incredible story without being a story. Why is one dog still wide awake with his big, white eyes when the rest are asleep? What is he thinking about? And is this the same dog who is asleep when it is time for the dogs to get up? And how about playing checkers on the boat while your buddy plays guitar? Dreamy. And the poor bird crossing the street This is my all time favorite book to read to my kids, even down to the size of the book. It uses some tricky moves to get children to learn, and its an incredible story without being a story. Why is one dog still wide awake with his big, white eyes when the rest are asleep? What is he thinking about? And is this the same dog who is asleep when it is time for the dogs to get up? And how about playing checkers on the boat while your buddy plays guitar? Dreamy. And the poor bird crossing the street that makes all the dogs Screech on their brakes. What was he thinking and where was he going? And finally, "Do you like my hat?" I randomly ask my kids that question intermittently and they always know exactly how to answer. By the way, anybody notice that the dog steals the feather out of the female dogs hat at one point? yes, its true. First she has the feather in her hat, then he seems to have snatched it. The Dog party at the end is like an opium dream. This must be the true dog heaven. I want to be reincarnated as a dog and star in Go Dog Go.

  22. 5 out of 5

    mwr

    This book gave me troubles in pre-school. It must have been some kind of Montessori situation, I'm not sure. All I can remember is that if I pretended that I could not read well then I would be with the kids whose nap-time involved back rubs. If I could read well then I was allowed into the room with all of the books (including this one, which I more or less wanted to read every day), but nap-time was governed by some awful person who did not rub backs. I was forced to choose between pretending This book gave me troubles in pre-school. It must have been some kind of Montessori situation, I'm not sure. All I can remember is that if I pretended that I could not read well then I would be with the kids whose nap-time involved back rubs. If I could read well then I was allowed into the room with all of the books (including this one, which I more or less wanted to read every day), but nap-time was governed by some awful person who did not rub backs. I was forced to choose between pretending to be dull but receiving back rubs and giving up back rubs but being allowed to read GDG every day). Such was my introduction to the imperfections of this world.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jem

    Wait...this book isn't by Dr. Seuss: Upon reading it, it became painfully obvious that this was no Dr. Seuss book. Being deceived like that makes me wonder if I'll read another book...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donna Bijas

    Fun book to read to children. Alas, I read to dogs who didn't even care for the pictures! Haha.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Keating

    I have no idea why kids like this book. I guess it would be better if I were 5 and someone were animatedly reading it to me. Not much of a plot. Nice colors.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    This is a simple review because I'm a simple guy. Go Dog Go kicked ass. It was the sole trophy of social hierarchy in our kindergarten class. When it was book time, everybody rushed the shelves and the dominant alpha males immediately trampled the girls and other weaklings to instinctively fight (at times, nearly to the death) over GDG. Whomever lay claim to the "conch" held rule over class for the remainder of the day, only to repeat this same process day after day. Eventually the wheat was sep This is a simple review because I'm a simple guy. Go Dog Go kicked ass. It was the sole trophy of social hierarchy in our kindergarten class. When it was book time, everybody rushed the shelves and the dominant alpha males immediately trampled the girls and other weaklings to instinctively fight (at times, nearly to the death) over GDG. Whomever lay claim to the "conch" held rule over class for the remainder of the day, only to repeat this same process day after day. Eventually the wheat was separated from the chaff, a king was established and GDG was his queen. This book single-handedly gave me my first lessons in the art of war... and the spoils of victory. I don't even remember the lame content. It's about dogs. Who cares. Point being, kids need GDG. They need to engage in these battles before their over-paranoid litigious parents and over-worked under-paid school faculty shield them from every challenge, danger and reward that life mercilessly fastball pitches in their face. I will never forget the legacy of Go Do Go. I can only pray that you and your children may not either. God bless.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    There's a lot going on in this classic from PD Eastman. I read it to my son (three years old) this past week and it's all that he talks about come bedtime. He calls it "Go Dog, Go Dog" and when I now open it for storytime he can read it to me! Here's what works in this book very well in my view: 1) the pacing - tight and almost staccato like. Seuss-esque all the way. 2) the "Do you like my hat" subplot (and brilliant resolution) - a hook my son talks about during the day, in fact. Well done. 3) col There's a lot going on in this classic from PD Eastman. I read it to my son (three years old) this past week and it's all that he talks about come bedtime. He calls it "Go Dog, Go Dog" and when I now open it for storytime he can read it to me! Here's what works in this book very well in my view: 1) the pacing - tight and almost staccato like. Seuss-esque all the way. 2) the "Do you like my hat" subplot (and brilliant resolution) - a hook my son talks about during the day, in fact. Well done. 3) color and penciling - the art has certainly held over the years since the book was first produced in the '60s and can hold a three-year old's attention like a tractor beam in this iPad/Netflix/iOS app world we live in. 4) length - this is a LONG book for a little person and I think that's just awesome. It has my son now wanting to read longer and turn pages. 5) questions - the narrative has the reader ask questions and think about what might be happening to carry the plot forward... excellent for young readers. To all you parents out there... get it. Good-bye... Good-bye.

  28. 3 out of 5

    Fox

    This book was one of my favorites as a kid. I used to lie awake at night and look over the illustrations trying to find every little detail. The dog party at the tree was a personal favorite of mine, as the details were intricate enough to occupy me for a very long time. Even reading it now the book is extremely dynamic, which somewhat makes up for the overall lack of narrative present in the book. What is the book about? Dogs in cars. The central narrative force is a poodle trying to find a hat This book was one of my favorites as a kid. I used to lie awake at night and look over the illustrations trying to find every little detail. The dog party at the tree was a personal favorite of mine, as the details were intricate enough to occupy me for a very long time. Even reading it now the book is extremely dynamic, which somewhat makes up for the overall lack of narrative present in the book. What is the book about? Dogs in cars. The central narrative force is a poodle trying to find a hat that the hound dog will like. "Do you like my hat?" "I do not." "Good-by." "Good-by." Riveting. Reading the book now I don't entirely understand what it was about the book I loved so much as a kid, aside from the sheer motion inherent in the illustrations. Maybe that's enough? Either way, this is a book I loved as a kid and judging by the reviews kids still love it now. Get it for those who like dogs. Dogs and cars. Ironically I still love both of those things now.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    My Dad read so many books to me, but this is one of the few that I remember. I still remember puzzling about what was so much better about the girl dog's hat at the end? I thought it was the ugliest hat she'd worn so far! The illustrations of the dogs sleeping were very thought-provoking to me as well. I wondered why the one dog didn't have its eyes open. Was it sleeping with its eyes open, or staying awake all night? Why did it say,"they will sleep all night", when obviously at least one of the My Dad read so many books to me, but this is one of the few that I remember. I still remember puzzling about what was so much better about the girl dog's hat at the end? I thought it was the ugliest hat she'd worn so far! The illustrations of the dogs sleeping were very thought-provoking to me as well. I wondered why the one dog didn't have its eyes open. Was it sleeping with its eyes open, or staying awake all night? Why did it say,"they will sleep all night", when obviously at least one of them was awake. Were the ones under the bed really asleep? I remember always wanting to be IN the cars myself. and sitting under the tree, and oh, I wanted to live in that houseboat! The dog party looked fun, but a little scary too. How did they keep from falling down? Best of all, I got to sit in my Dad's lap and hear him make voices for the different dogs. Thank you P.D. Eastman.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Let's just have this book represent not only all of the Dr. Suess-level books that were read throughout my earliest of childhood but also the dedication my father showed me, from the time I could open my eyes, going through flashcards with me, reading silly books like these with me, to the point where I knew each and every word by heart and wouldn't hesitate to call him out on a missed passage -- granted, it was simply becuase of the pictures and the repetition, not that I was reading -- so let' Let's just have this book represent not only all of the Dr. Suess-level books that were read throughout my earliest of childhood but also the dedication my father showed me, from the time I could open my eyes, going through flashcards with me, reading silly books like these with me, to the point where I knew each and every word by heart and wouldn't hesitate to call him out on a missed passage -- granted, it was simply becuase of the pictures and the repetition, not that I was reading -- so let's just place this at the beginning of the timeline of books to represent this whole era of reading... how would I be critiquing Empire Falls, adding a 9th Steinbeck, mowing through McCarthy's, telling everyone on earth to read Franny and Zooey, or teaching 1984 if this era would have been different?

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