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Peter und die Sternenfänger

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Orphan Peter and his mates are dispatched to an island ruled by the evil King Zarboff. They set sail aboard the Never Land, a ship carrying a precious and mysterious cargo the "greatest treasure on earth" - but is it gold, jewels, or something far more mysterious and dangerous? Adds to classic Peter Pan.


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Orphan Peter and his mates are dispatched to an island ruled by the evil King Zarboff. They set sail aboard the Never Land, a ship carrying a precious and mysterious cargo the "greatest treasure on earth" - but is it gold, jewels, or something far more mysterious and dangerous? Adds to classic Peter Pan.

30 review for Peter und die Sternenfänger

  1. 3 out of 5

    Billy

    Pulitzer Prize winning humorist Dave Barry, best selling mystery writer Ridley Pearson, and illustrator Greg Call have combined their talents to create a series of prequels to the J.M. Barrie classic Peter Pan. This is the first of those stories. Let me start my little review by saying that this book is so fun, exciting, and enjoyable that I have completely forgotten (almost) the creepy feeling I felt as a 42 year old man wandering around the children's section of the library looking for it. Yes i Pulitzer Prize winning humorist Dave Barry, best selling mystery writer Ridley Pearson, and illustrator Greg Call have combined their talents to create a series of prequels to the J.M. Barrie classic Peter Pan. This is the first of those stories. Let me start my little review by saying that this book is so fun, exciting, and enjoyable that I have completely forgotten (almost) the creepy feeling I felt as a 42 year old man wandering around the children's section of the library looking for it. Yes it's a children's book, make fun of me if you want, but it's not like I was breathlessly turning the pages to find out what would happen if Grover encountered a monster at the end of the book. At over 450 pages it follows the trend set by the Harry Potter books.... The story is equally satisfying for both kids and adults that grew up with these legendary characters, and thick enough that kids can do serious damage to the child predators that lurking around every corner (at least according to NBC's "Dateline"). The type is a little larger for the younger readers, but not so big that adults will be embarrassed. Have you ever wondered... How an orphan from England learned to fly, never grow old, make his home on a deserted island, and become everybody's favorite peanut butter pitchman? How the most feared ambidextrous pirate on the high seas became the infamous embodiment of one handed evil (second only to the drummer for Def Leppard). How that annoying little fairy wound up living on Neverland? I mean Tinkerbell, not Michael Jackson. All these questions are answered, and more. Seriously, this is an excellent book, and I will definitely be slinking my way back to that room in the library with the little tables and chairs so that I can continue following the adventures of Peter and his cohorts.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    *Reviewer's Note: obviously, there isn't a movie version of this book (yet, anyway - they're supposedly working on one, which will probably be terrible but I'll save that rant for later) so once again I have to put a book on my The Movie Is Better shelf because I can't be bothered to create a shelf titled The Stage Adaptation Is Better. Just keep in mind that if that shelf existed, this book would be there* First, Some Background: (for review of actual book, please skip ahead to paragraph four) S *Reviewer's Note: obviously, there isn't a movie version of this book (yet, anyway - they're supposedly working on one, which will probably be terrible but I'll save that rant for later) so once again I have to put a book on my The Movie Is Better shelf because I can't be bothered to create a shelf titled The Stage Adaptation Is Better. Just keep in mind that if that shelf existed, this book would be there* First, Some Background: (for review of actual book, please skip ahead to paragraph four) So this past spring, I spent four days in New York with three of my friends. As we are all giant theater dorks, our sole objective was to see as many shows as we could for as cheaply as possible (a feat we accomplished quite spectacularly, thank you verra much). One of my friends, the the giantest theater dork of us all, had heard fantastic things about this off-Broadway show called Peter and the Starcatcher, and convinced us that we had to venture away from Times Square in order to see it. The short version of the story is, after a subway adventure and being afraid we wouldn't get to see the show because we bought stand-by tickets because the show was technically sold out, we got in. And oh my sweet baby Jesus, it was the best thing I have ever seen on stage, ever. EVER. It was funny and touching and exciting and sad and fucking hilarious. Almost all the props, scenery, and special effects were created by the actors, which made the whole show look like something being performed in someone's attic by a bunch of neighborhood kids (which, really, is the only way a Peter Pan story can be performed) who just happened to be extremely talented. (see the show's website here for an idea of what it looked like) The cast was amazing, the script was perfect, and it was alternately funny and heartbreaking. My point is, the show is the sole reason I read this book, and I knew going into it that the book had no chance of being as good as the play, so I wasn't even that disappointed when I turned out to be right. JM Barrie's Peter Pan, while amazing, left a lot of unanswered questions. How did Peter get to the island? Who taught him to fly? Where did the pirates come from? How did Peter and Tinkerbell meet? Why, if fairy dust allows people to fly, is Peter the only one who can fly without it? Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson took these questions and used them to write a Peter Pan origin story, and it's much, much cooler than it sounds. Peter starts out as an orphan, along with several of his friends from the orphanage, being put on a ship and sent across the ocean to work as servants for an evil king. Also on the ship is Molly, a girl who knows more than she's telling about a mysterious trunk being kept belowdecks with mysteriously magical properties. In pursuit of the ship, and the magic, is the pirate Black Stache. Did I mention that the ship Peter is placed on is called the Never Land? Oh yes, I see what you did there. It all makes for a fast-paced, fun pirate adventure with lots of action and humor (not as funny as the play, I have to admit). As I read, I kept thinking that this is the book The Dagger Quick wished it could be. The characters are all great, especially Molly, who despite fulfilling the usual Girl Character in an Adventure Story jobs like being held hostage and getting rescued, is still perfectly capable and intelligent, and gets to do her fair share of the rescuing. Also she speaks Porpoise, which was never not funny. My only gripe about the book, really, is that the authors seem oddly intent on making connections between the book and the animated Disney version of Peter Pan, instead of Barrie's original. Characters from the movie are described in the book as looking just like their animated counterparts: Peter has bright red hair, Black Stache (who becomes Hook) has curly black hair and a long mustache, and Smee is described wearing the same outfit he wears in the movie. The last straw was Tinkerbell, who in this version was originally a bird (it makes sense, I promise) that had a green body and a bright yellow head. However, this annoying aspect might not have actually been the authors fault: given that the publishing information at the beginning of the book loudly proclaims that this is a DISNEY EDITIONS book, I imagine the publishers prodded the authors to include some stuff that would tie the book into the animated movie. This was a fun book, although vastly different from the (superior) stage version. I could go into all the differences, but frankly this review is long enough and I'm not sure anyone actually cares that much. The point is, the book is a fun adventure story that is actually a really well-done prequel to Peter Pan, but if you get a chance to see the play, you absolutely should. Okay, one more thing about the play: here are two lines that I remember and wanted to share. First, from Captain Stache to Smee: "Oh Smee. How flat and unprofitable the world must look from the deck of your HMS Cynic." And here's what Molly said to Peter when they said goodbye, in a scene that made the whole damn theater cry like babies: "It's supposed to hurt. That's how you know it meant something."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara Bow

    Süße Story und tolles Abenteuerbuch - aber eher für jüngere Leser. Werde die Bücher meinem kleinen Bruder schenken, der damit sicherlich mehr Freude haben wird als ich. Breche die Reihe damit erstmal ab.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Michael Fierce

    Sometimes I think I am Peter Pan because if growing up means you have to put down or put away the things you've loved since you were a kid then I can tell you I don't want to grow up. Not now. Not ever. Never. Ever. I planned to read the original classic one day, having always been a fan of the Disney animated cartoon version growing up, that forever connected me to Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Wendy and all the wonderful characters and places associated with Kensington Gardens and Neverland. I coul Sometimes I think I am Peter Pan because if growing up means you have to put down or put away the things you've loved since you were a kid then I can tell you I don't want to grow up. Not now. Not ever. Never. Ever. I planned to read the original classic one day, having always been a fan of the Disney animated cartoon version growing up, that forever connected me to Peter Pan, Captain Hook, Wendy and all the wonderful characters and places associated with Kensington Gardens and Neverland. I couldn't find a version that had a cover I really wanted so I thought I'd hold out until I found just the right one. Then, one day, I saw the 2003 film version directed by P.J. Hogan, and though I'll probably get eaten by a crocodile for saying this, I think it's far superior to any version before it and any that will follow. The minute the movie ended, a craving to read more Peter Pan gnawed at me until I finally picked up Peter and the Starcatchers. Peter and the Starcatchers was a little different than what I was expecting. A bit of the background and history of the original Peter Pan had been reworked but it didn't matter because this book was still a lot of fun, clever, action-packed, spiritually rewarding, and even answered a few questions along the way. It continued my interest and appreciation for everything I loved about Peter Pan in the first place. I plan to read the entire series and am so glad writers of this calibre are continuing the myth and magic that is Peter Pan, who made his first appearance in 1902!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Loved it. Great fantasy. prequel to peter pan. grades late 4th - 8. Grade 5-9–This prequel to Peter Pan refers as much to the 1953 animated Disney film as to J. M. Barrie's original play and novel. The early chapters introduce the archetypal antagonists: Peter, leader of a group of orphan boys being sent into slavery aboard the Never Land, and Black Stache, a fearsome pirate who commands a villainous crew. New characters include Molly Aster and her father. Molly, at 14, is an apprentice Starcatc Loved it. Great fantasy. prequel to peter pan. grades late 4th - 8. Grade 5-9–This prequel to Peter Pan refers as much to the 1953 animated Disney film as to J. M. Barrie's original play and novel. The early chapters introduce the archetypal antagonists: Peter, leader of a group of orphan boys being sent into slavery aboard the Never Land, and Black Stache, a fearsome pirate who commands a villainous crew. New characters include Molly Aster and her father. Molly, at 14, is an apprentice Starcatcher, a secret society formed to keep evildoers from obtaining "starstuff," magic material that falls to earth and conveys happiness, power, increased intelligence, and the ability to fly. Inevitably, the ships wreck off a tropical island and a trunk of starstuff is temporarily lost. Here, readers meet more familiar characters: the mermaids in their lagoon; the indigenous people who live in the jungle (modern versions of Barrie's redskins); and, of course, the crocodile. The authors plait multiple story lines together in short, fast-moving chapters, with the growing friendship between Molly and Peter at the narrative's emotional center. Capitalizing on familiar material, this adventure is carefully crafted to set the stage for Peter's later exploits. This smoothly written page-turner just might send readers back to the original

  6. 5 out of 5

    Janssen

    I love Dave Barry. My parents both adore Dave Barry, as does my grandmother, and they've been reading or handing off various columns and books of his to me for as long as I can remember. I've read practically every column he's ever written and most of his books. For some reason, though, I've never read his novels, Big Trouble and Tricky Business. I love his non-fiction columns, so I was less interested in his fictional books. Then, when I went home for Christmas, my brother was reading the secon I love Dave Barry. My parents both adore Dave Barry, as does my grandmother, and they've been reading or handing off various columns and books of his to me for as long as I can remember. I've read practically every column he's ever written and most of his books. For some reason, though, I've never read his novels, Big Trouble and Tricky Business. I love his non-fiction columns, so I was less interested in his fictional books. Then, when I went home for Christmas, my brother was reading the second of Dave Barry's juvenile books, called "Peter and the Shadow Thieves." I asked him how they were, and he raved about them. Even at eleven-years-old, I trust his advice, so a few weeks ago (I clearly don't trust his advice in a TIMELY manner), I picked up the first one at the library. This is a fun book. I think I've mentioned before that I really adore re-tellings of classic or widely-known stories. I think Beauty (Robin McKinley) is excellent, and I love Ella Enchanted (Gail Carson Levine). There's just something so thrilling about watching the pieces fit together when you already know what the end result is. This book fits right into that category. It's the story of how Peter Pan became, well, Peter Pan. Read my complete review at http://everydayreading.blogspot.com/2...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lissa

    I picked this book up in the airport on my way to South Africa because I thought it looked a bit Harry Potter-esque. I knew it was a book for children, but it had a heft similar to the Harry Potter books, and I was looking for something light and fast to read. Sometimes, for plane reading, I don't want something heavy and ponderous - just something that will keep my attention and interest for long enough to get from here to there. Unfortunately, the heft of the book and the magical subject matte I picked this book up in the airport on my way to South Africa because I thought it looked a bit Harry Potter-esque. I knew it was a book for children, but it had a heft similar to the Harry Potter books, and I was looking for something light and fast to read. Sometimes, for plane reading, I don't want something heavy and ponderous - just something that will keep my attention and interest for long enough to get from here to there. Unfortunately, the heft of the book and the magical subject matter are about where the similarities between Peter and the Starcatchers and Harry Potter end. Peter and the Starcatchers is a sort of prequel to Peter Pan. It tells the story of how Peter went from being an orphan in London to becoming Peter Pan. In fact, one of the most interesting aspects of the story is seeing how each of the players in the Peter Pan story that most people know comes into the scene. At the beginning of the book, Peter and four other orphans from St. Norbert's in London (the future Lost Boys, of course) are loaded onto the ship, the "Never Land" sailing for the country of Rundoon. They are to be sold into service for the evil King of Rundoon, King Zarboff the Third. On the boat, Peter sees a mysterious magical trunk loaded, and makes the aquaintance of a young girl named Molly who is perhaps not all that she seems. Meanwhile, the evil pirate Black Stache (the future Captain Hook, of course) plans to the steal the magical trunk for his own use. Much of the rest of the book is a comedy of errors as each of the factions tries to get a hold of the trunk. There are, of course, other side adventures including some savages (the indians?), a lagoon full of mermaids, and a gigantic crocodile. The book is a great children's book, but unlike Harry Potter, it does not transcend the genre. As an adult, I found the action to be pretty thin, the plot and the writing very simiplistic and not particularly thought provoking. As a children's book, I think it has a lot of things going for it, including a good length. As seven or eight year old, I think I would have enjoyed this book immensely. In thinking about the books I loved as a child (A Wrinkle in Time, The Dark is Rising series, The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle -- all of which I read around grade 3 or 4), this is definitely less intricate and thought provoking. But for a younger child - even one where it's still necessary to read books aloud, this would be good. I think it would be especially good for young boys who don't have the young adult series like The Babysitter's Club enticing them to read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a really cute story. It's a prequel to Peter Pan that starts at the very beginning...before Wendy, before Never Land, and when Captain Hook had no hook. I had tried reading this book a couple times, but could never get past chapter 5 or so. It was just a bit too slow...However, my mom-in-law lent me these books forever ago, and I felt I needed to read them and return them. :) So that's what I did! It still took me awhile to get into this book. The main problem (and reason I gave it 3 sta This was a really cute story. It's a prequel to Peter Pan that starts at the very beginning...before Wendy, before Never Land, and when Captain Hook had no hook. I had tried reading this book a couple times, but could never get past chapter 5 or so. It was just a bit too slow...However, my mom-in-law lent me these books forever ago, and I felt I needed to read them and return them. :) So that's what I did! It still took me awhile to get into this book. The main problem (and reason I gave it 3 stars instead of 4) is that the plot isn't described until page 160! That was far too long to get the actual plot going. But once you know what's actually happening, it's quite enjoyable. Peter and four of his orphan friends (the Lost Boys) are on a boat heading for Rundoon to become slaves to the wicked King. One night, Peter sneaks out for food and comes across a mysterious trunk that is causing quite the stir on the boat. Especially among a young girl the same age as Peter, Molly. She seems to know what's going on, and is even protecting the trunk. What you finally find out is that the trunk is full of Starstuff, a precious element that falls from the sky and produces wonderful results such as flying, healing, and the ability to never grow old...see where it's going? The story then climaxes with a battle between Peter, Molly, and the Lost Boys, Natives (the Indians...) Mermaids, and Pirates on an island in the middle of nowhere. The result is a really fun story with wonderful twists. It was a fun story, one I would definitely read to my kids one day....

  9. 3 out of 5

    Travis

    If you are going to write a prequel and explain everything about a book considered a 'classic' than at least come up up with something better than this. Somehow two fairly talented writers got together and managed to suck most of the fun and magic out of Peter Pan. That takes effort. The explaination of how NeverLand came to be is on a level of feeble right up there with George Lucas deciding the Force is caused by alien germs. The only character I liked was the pirate that eventually becomes Captai If you are going to write a prequel and explain everything about a book considered a 'classic' than at least come up up with something better than this. Somehow two fairly talented writers got together and managed to suck most of the fun and magic out of Peter Pan. That takes effort. The explaination of how NeverLand came to be is on a level of feeble right up there with George Lucas deciding the Force is caused by alien germs. The only character I liked was the pirate that eventually becomes Captain Hook, and by the end of the book I was actively rooting for him to kill Peter, so I wouldn't have to worry they'd do a sequel. So much of the actual Neverland stuff comes in the last quarter of the book and felt like the writers suddenly realized they needed to stick that stuff into the story. It felt very forced. Skip this book and go read Peter Pan. It tells you all you need to know about Neverland, Peter and fairies and does it in a fun way that makes more sense than this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    JP Seabury

    I have vague childhood memories of the tale of Peter Pan and Wendy, which probably come more from the Disney movie than any books that might have been read to me as a child. But from what I remember, it was one of those stories that starts in the middle of some other story. You don't know, for instance, how Peter Pan came to be a boy who could fly, or never grow-up. You don't know how it is that he lives on an island with the Lost Boys, a tribe of "Indians", and his arch-nemesis, Captain Hook. In I have vague childhood memories of the tale of Peter Pan and Wendy, which probably come more from the Disney movie than any books that might have been read to me as a child. But from what I remember, it was one of those stories that starts in the middle of some other story. You don't know, for instance, how Peter Pan came to be a boy who could fly, or never grow-up. You don't know how it is that he lives on an island with the Lost Boys, a tribe of "Indians", and his arch-nemesis, Captain Hook. In the book, Peter and the Starcatchers, you discover the answer to all those questions. It's a wonderful book (which I managed to get for $2.00), and I enjoyed every minute of it. I tell others that I screen these "big kid" books, by reading them before giving them to my three sons -- but the truth is, I love them! Peter & the Starcatchers is the first of three books written by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson, all apparently not authorized by the character's copyright holder. Nonetheless, they are original, masterful pieces of writing, and I highly recommend them to young (and old) readers.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Cindy

    This was chosen as a book club read for me, and my initial reaction to the selection was "Oh, no. Not another Peter Pan story." I was pleasantly surprised at this "prequel" series. It is definitely recommended for kids, but I enjoyed it myself. I thought the ideas of how Pater Pan and his friends came to be was quite creative. For any audio book fans, this is read by Jim Dale of Harry Potter fame. Just like in Rowling's books, Dale is fabulous at reading these stories. The book (and its sequels) This was chosen as a book club read for me, and my initial reaction to the selection was "Oh, no. Not another Peter Pan story." I was pleasantly surprised at this "prequel" series. It is definitely recommended for kids, but I enjoyed it myself. I thought the ideas of how Pater Pan and his friends came to be was quite creative. For any audio book fans, this is read by Jim Dale of Harry Potter fame. Just like in Rowling's books, Dale is fabulous at reading these stories. The book (and its sequels) are pretty lengthy, but they read pretty quickly.

  12. 3 out of 5

    Angelic Zaizai

    Mau tau kenapa Peter [pan:] bisa terbang ?? Mau tau kenapa Peter tetep jadi anak2 selamanya ?? Mau tau kenapa ada nama Neverland ? Mau tau kapan Peter kenalan sama Molly ? Mau tau darimana asal Wendy ?? Mau ??? Pake Three.. eh baca aja novel ini.. seruuuu *serasa deja vu gini.. pas banget ya King of Neverland - Michael Jackson meninggal... RIP*

  13. 3 out of 5

    عمران

    This book deserve 3 stars Really fantastic I decide to rate 5 stars but when press the golden stars i check 3 stars My favorite character, Peter, was portrayed differently than his Disney, film and novel counterparts (He also isn’t explicitly called “Peter Pan” either), but he was still the boastful yet playful and free-spirited character that audiences have come to love. His developing relationship with Molly was truly a treasure to read as it unfolded, and despite being new characters, I grew This book deserve 3 stars Really fantastic I decide to rate 5 stars but when press the golden stars i check 3 stars My favorite character, Peter, was portrayed differently than his Disney, film and novel counterparts (He also isn’t explicitly called “Peter Pan” either), but he was still the boastful yet playful and free-spirited character that audiences have come to love. His developing relationship with Molly was truly a treasure to read as it unfolded, and despite being new characters, I grew fond of Molly and her father. Writing-wise, and surprisingly, the book often had very beautiful imagery and metaphorical descriptions, making it easier for the reader to envision the world that Barry and Pearson re-created. A lot of Barry’s wit and humor was palpable throughout the novel, which fit really well with the adventurous tone that the story had. It helped relieved a lot of the more intense or mysterious moments. I’m not going to provide any specific spoilers because I think everyone who’s reading this right now should read this book and embark on its journey. Overall, it’s an amazing book. It’s the first in a series — there’s at least three more books following the first one. I can never put this book down, regardless of the amounts of times that I’ve reread it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joe Hunt

    This book is horrible. (Full disclosure: once upon a time, I thought Dave Barry was funny -- in the 80's -- so not a total hater.) But I'm a huge J.M. Barrie fan (or Johnny Depp-as-J.M. Barrie). p.s. I read it -- b/c I heard on comingsoon: they're going to make it into a movie. Read the real Peter Pan alongside it -- I was doing that -- and you'll feel totally insulted. The original...We've all seen the Disney cartoon (and the legend is so big), so we think we know it. But no. It's so well-written. E This book is horrible. (Full disclosure: once upon a time, I thought Dave Barry was funny -- in the 80's -- so not a total hater.) But I'm a huge J.M. Barrie fan (or Johnny Depp-as-J.M. Barrie). p.s. I read it -- b/c I heard on comingsoon: they're going to make it into a movie. Read the real Peter Pan alongside it -- I was doing that -- and you'll feel totally insulted. The original...We've all seen the Disney cartoon (and the legend is so big), so we think we know it. But no. It's so well-written. Every single line is funny, practically. And he sticks in some side-commentary, for example...Fantastic. (The 2003 live action Pan is pretty great -- also b/c it's close to the book. So, I mean: better than Disney.) Anyhow: the book is horrible. And a terrible affront to the memory and real thing. Peter & the Starcatchers not funny at all. I would say: "Like they're not even trying...but they are a tiny bit, and it doesn't work." The plot is really small and frail. Could sum it up in one paragraph: a treasure chest full of fairy dust. The bad guys try to steal it. (The good guys try to stop them. It's a race.) Peter gets some, and it makes him fly. And it's so formulaic -- like, they have a list. "Okay. What do we need in there, to make it look like a Peter Pan book ? A boy named Peter: check. Someone who ends up being Hook: check. "Let's call him Black Stache. That's a stupid name." Check. Smittee, some fairy dust, alligator, mermaids, flying... Anyhow, I'm really angry. It's one of the saddest things I've ever read. A rip-off and a cheap knock-off, forgery / travesty... Really just an insult to one of the greatest stories ever. And so now Disney is turning it into a movie. Here's the thing, too: I, personally, would love to see the further adventures of Peter Pan -- if someone could write them well, make them interesting. Be true to the original (even the side-commentary, I think)...Of course, have some of the old elements -- but have some new stuff, too, that's cool and interesting. Fun. The new stuff here: talking porpoises. Horrible. Really -- like "Worst.Book.Ever." (I wanted to put zero stars. But I had to put one, so they knew I registered.) p.s. Final thought: I think I'm going to write my own further adventures of Peter Pan, someday. Just to prove it can be done: better. If something's worth doing, it's worth doing right. Already started brainstorming.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wart Hill

    I'm not entirely sure what to say about this book. I enjoyed it, it was fun...but I felt oddly distanced from the characters and the story. I never felt fully invested. I don't know if that was just a me thing or if it was the book, but even so I did manage to get all the way through. And it was a nice, fun read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    This book by Dave Barry is very similar to the original Peter Pan But has more action and includes more info. It tells the adventure of Peter and his friends (all of whom are orphaned) on their journey across the sea while being chased by the most dreaded pirate in history: Black stache. I would recommend this book to fans of Peter Pan and other book like that.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Liz B

    What a slog this was to get through, in spite of Jim Dale's wonderful-as-always narration. My husband said that Dale's contribution primarily made it obvious how inferior this book was to the Harry Potter series. We finished it, though...months after starting.

  18. 3 out of 5

    Aoife

    3.5 stars

  19. 3 out of 5

    Totoro

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. well, there are some mixed feelings towards this book, at first,if you'd noticed, "i really wanted" it, paper back or electronic, didn't matter. after i got it, i was still really excited being a peter pan fan and also i really love sea adventures , pirates, fairies and all that, so i started the book head over hills. everything about the book, though except for the term "starstuff" instead of "fairy powder", was fine. i honestly don't know what went wrong between me and this book, maybe i don't well, there are some mixed feelings towards this book, at first,if you'd noticed, "i really wanted" it, paper back or electronic, didn't matter. after i got it, i was still really excited being a peter pan fan and also i really love sea adventures , pirates, fairies and all that, so i started the book head over hills. everything about the book, though except for the term "starstuff" instead of "fairy powder", was fine. i honestly don't know what went wrong between me and this book, maybe i don't like adaptations, it was my first time anyway. peter was great, explanations about the characters were obvious and to the point, the characters were a little too many, sometimes i lost track of the many names and how i've had pictured them the first time. the background for the Lockness monster bit was funny XD and to my most favorite part which would take 2 stars out of the 4 :the audio book with Jim Dale's voice, once again i felt like i was traveling through harry potter with him, it was magical and wonderful, thank you Mr. Dale ^ ^ بعنوان کسی که عشق داستانای مربوط به دزدای دریایی و پیترپنه این کتاب یکم ناامیدم کرد دلیلش برا خودمم کامل مشخص نیست. داستان عالی بود و یجورایی وقایع قبل از داستان اصلی پیترپن رو میگفت به نظرم یکم هم دزدان دریایی کارائیب داشت توش . یخورده شخصیت زیاد داشت به نظرم و گاهی وقتا .بعضی هاشونو فراموش میکردم. ویادم میرفت بار اول چه شکلی تصورشون کزده بودم دزدای دریایی دقیقا همون کارتونی وخنده دار میومدن تو ذهنم. پیترش نسبت به پیتر اصلی آقای بری یکم نایس تر بود به نظرم. وازونجایی که کتاب صوتیشم گوش کردم با صدای آقای جیم دیل. عاااااااالی بود از خود کتاب میتونم بگم لذتش بیشتر بود برام

  20. 3 out of 5

    Jenny

    This was a fun adventure! So this is sort of a Peter Pan retelling/prequel of the original story. Basically this story tells us how Peter Pan was created. Fun adventure, and felt very true to the original Peter Pan. I really liked it!

  21. 5 out of 5

    J. Bookish

    I’m a sucker for all things Peter Pan. I wanted to read this because I was interested in the play, but I don’t enjoy reading scripts so I thought “hey, source material!”. I think this was incredibly inventive prequel to a very well-loved story. It could have gone horribly wrong, but it only served to make me love the characters even more. The writing was not my favorite. A bit choppy. The chapters were very short and bounced around quite a lot; perhaps more than necessary. It is an MG novel, tho I’m a sucker for all things Peter Pan. I wanted to read this because I was interested in the play, but I don’t enjoy reading scripts so I thought “hey, source material!”. I think this was incredibly inventive prequel to a very well-loved story. It could have gone horribly wrong, but it only served to make me love the characters even more. The writing was not my favorite. A bit choppy. The chapters were very short and bounced around quite a lot; perhaps more than necessary. It is an MG novel, though, so I’ll overlook that. I didn’t think I would want to continue with the series, but I totally do. More Neverland please.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dave Revere

    Pirates and magic? Flying and stars? I was in before I even opened the book. Peter and the Starcatchers is a wonder-filled origin story for J.M. Barrie’s famous boy who never grew up. Peter Pan has always been the character with whom I most identify in fiction. His eternal dilemma between remaining static in the joys of boyhood and embarking on the greater adventure of growing up is ever poignant as I find myself becoming more proactive to prevent my own childlike sensibilities from slipping awa Pirates and magic? Flying and stars? I was in before I even opened the book. Peter and the Starcatchers is a wonder-filled origin story for J.M. Barrie’s famous boy who never grew up. Peter Pan has always been the character with whom I most identify in fiction. His eternal dilemma between remaining static in the joys of boyhood and embarking on the greater adventure of growing up is ever poignant as I find myself becoming more proactive to prevent my own childlike sensibilities from slipping away. This book, though, is not that metaphor. This book is a rip-roaring, page-turning, joke-stuffed adventure. From the very first page, where we learn that Peter is the undisputed leader of a gang of boys because he can spit the farthest, we settle into the boyish tone of this tale. The adventure begins when Peter and the other orphan boys are sold to a ship called the Never Land whose first mate plans to deliver them as slaves for an evil king. Peter soon meets a mysterious girl named Molly. We learn from her, after Peter discovers a trunk of glowing green stuff, the central notion of the plot. Starstuff is a magical substance that falls to Earth every so often, imparting a sense of joy, the ability to fly and numerous other powers to whoever possesses it. The down side is if it falls into the wrong hands, those powers could corrupt and destroy our world. Molly belongs to a secret society sworn to safeguard the starstuff, and there are plenty of wrong hands which the two of them must prevent it from falling into. Mystery writer Ridley Pearson and humorist Dave Barry infuse this book with richly-developed, laugh-out-loud characters. Peter is brave and kind, yet bull-headed and obsessed with Molly’s opinion of him. Black Stache is a greasy, foul-breathed villain with a foot-long mustache and a knack for naval warfare. The colorful verbal abuse which he rains down on Smee, his inept first mate, is made more hilarious by the fact that Smee seems strangely immune to any actual consequences for his bungling. The boys each have a quirk of their own, and Molly is the kind of girl who’s smarter than everyone in the room and knows it. I admire how thoroughly the authors mine each personality for humor. Laughs are sprinkled in every chapter with simple, character-coloring interjections like this one: “‘All right, then,’ said Alf, who was not one to ask questions when two bob was involved.” Most memorable for me, though – the passages which really engaged my inner-boy, were those which described characters suffused in starstuff. Moments without trouble are rare in an adventure, and when they do come, they’re usually the boring parts. Here, though, we’re treated to imaginative descriptions of joy tethered to the physical details of flying. Mix that into hilarious scenarios involving unlikely flying things, and you have some of the most exhilarating and unique sections of the book. The authors do a nice job of explaining how Peter came to be the character we know, as well as building a setting familiar to us as the Neverland of Barrie’s story. I’m not sure if we needed to know these things. I tend to think Peter Pan loses a bit of his symbolic and connecting magic when his world and back story are so thoroughly explained. The authors do a nice job, however, of describing the changes Peter undergoes with a bittersweet sense of the inevitable consequences to come. We feel the immortal struggle of Peter Pan beginning to dawn. In any case, I don’t think most boys will want to read this for its full accounting of Peter’s origins so much as for the fact that it is a hilarious adventure which I defy you to put down. It’s chapters are short and stuffed with battles, pirates, creatures and magic. More than thatl, Peter and the Starcatchers left me yearning for starstuff of my own!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    First in the Peter and the Starcatchers children's fantasy series loosely based upon Peter Pan, the Lost Boys, and Neverland. The Story Is it fate or happenstance that five lonely orphan boys are being shipped out on a dilapidated ship along with a young but valiant lady, a starcatcher by birth? Molly Aster is unexpectedly guarding a valuable treasure from the stars aboard the Never Land. A treasure that was somehow switched with the decoy. Under fire from Captain Black Stache, the storm that rises First in the Peter and the Starcatchers children's fantasy series loosely based upon Peter Pan, the Lost Boys, and Neverland. The Story Is it fate or happenstance that five lonely orphan boys are being shipped out on a dilapidated ship along with a young but valiant lady, a starcatcher by birth? Molly Aster is unexpectedly guarding a valuable treasure from the stars aboard the Never Land. A treasure that was somehow switched with the decoy. Under fire from Captain Black Stache, the storm that rises up sends everyone ashore where more and greater adventures ensue and the starstuff wreaks havoc on all. The Characters Leonard Aster and his daughter, Molly, are from a long line of starcatchers and they were escorting a valuable trunk of starstuff to be returned to space. Well, one of 'em is anyway... For Molly is on the Never Land while her father is on one of the Royal Navy ships. Peter, James, Prentiss, Thomas, and Tubby Ted are the five orphans being sent to King Zarboff III to a lifetime of slavery Fighting Prawn is the leader of the Mollusk Indians after escaping over a decade of pressed service in His Majesty's navy. Alf was one of Mr. Slank's men from the Never Land who was won over by the trunk of starstuff and became an ally for the Molly and Peter. Slank is the first mate and actual captain of the Never Land and you can just tell from how he treats people that he's a bad man. Just ask Ammm. Captain Black Stache is an evil pirate with a crew of idjits headed up by Smee. Mister Grin is the lizard who grew after exposure to the starstuff. My Take At last! The "true story" behind Peter Pan, mermaids, centaurs, and sea monsters! Actually Barry and Pearson have been ingenious in using the Peter Pan tale to create their own children's fantasy and it is quite an adventure from the start of the tale to the end of this installment. The authors have cleverly explained most of the highlights of the Peter Pan story from the captain's hook, the crocodile who trails him, Tinker Bell—including her bells!, the origin of Neverland, from whence the lost boys came, why Peter will never grow up, how they gained the ability to fly...it's too much fun for words!! It does have a sad ending. One that will have you reaching for the next in the series, Peter and the Shadow Thieves. The Cover The cover certainly makes you think Peter Pan as the evil Captain Black Stache stands braced with surprise, his sword in his hand...he'd better enjoy having that hand while it lasts! His sidekick, Smee, is holding Molly prisoner with all three of them standing on the deck of a ship with the trunk of starstuff glimmering in a trail pointing to Peter, flying, backlit by the moon. I do love how the "magic continues" with the holographic effect of the title and the three-sided border on the cover! The title, Peter and the Starcatchers, is an excellent summary of the story although it doesn't hold up at the end.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Tasasha Battle

    In my placement my teacher choose to read to the students, as a relaxing fun literature for the end of the year, a book named Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. On my first glance at the book I assumed that it would be too advanced and confusing to read aloud to the students. However, when my teacher begun to read the students froze and was glued with their mouths open to the book’s content. From there I realized the value of reading to your students. Additionally, in o In my placement my teacher choose to read to the students, as a relaxing fun literature for the end of the year, a book named Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. On my first glance at the book I assumed that it would be too advanced and confusing to read aloud to the students. However, when my teacher begun to read the students froze and was glued with their mouths open to the book’s content. From there I realized the value of reading to your students. Additionally, in one reading my teacher caught me in the same stare of amazement as the students. I could not believe that the book I did not want my teacher to read had me entwine like the students. Needless to say, I bought the book the same week and read it with my class. Keeping in mind my “Reading like a Writer” project I discovered that Barry and Pearson used a craft that I appreciated because it is done so well. This craft I calls transitional cutting. The authors would have two stories or scenes going on at the same time with little confusion to the reader when transitioning between them. Thinking about including that craft in my writings would be challenging, on the other hand, when Barry and Pearson executes this craft it actually adds drama to the piece. I got help with the name of the craft from Fletcher chapter nine, “Its About Time.” I thought that this craft could be a form of “cutting” with “focusing on a narrow slice of time” but I did not feel that the authors removed information or took a single scene and focused on it in great detail. Both scenes where told in great detail that the reader could conclude that the authors felt that its contents are important to the story. So, that is why I came up with transitioning cutting. One example of where this craft is used is when Peter comes up with a plan to return to the cargo hold where he discovered an unusually acting trunk with Slank while Captain Scott and Smeed discussed in the captain quarters the new name of the ship Neitherland. Barry and Pearson told both of these scenes in detail at the same time in a transitional cutting way. When Peter had to make noise to twist the lock off the door made the reader nervous, however you knew that they went unnoticed due to the fact that the reader also knows that the captain and first mate where securely in the captain quarters. To move back and forth between these scenes with such clarity forced the reader to become part of the story and feel the nerviness between Peter and Slank down in the cargo hold. Moreover, this strategy of transitional cutting would be beneficial to teach to my students to improve their writings. I would use this book as a mentor text to read to my students to discover how Barry and Pearson use it to tell the story of Peter and the starcatchers. As a mini lesson I would read my own story with two scenes to the class and let them practice the craft with the thoughts of Barry, Pearson and the teacher as examples.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Where exactly did Peter Pan come from? How come he never ages? Just when did he and Tinkerbell meet? Ever wonder? So did Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. They took it further - hence Peter and the Starcatchers! The story begins with Peter and four other orphan boys placed on board a ship - the Never Land. The accommodations are wretched, the voyage even more so. Peter discovers a locked, guarded trunk with strange properties. A girl his age, Molly, seems to be the only other passenger aware of this Where exactly did Peter Pan come from? How come he never ages? Just when did he and Tinkerbell meet? Ever wonder? So did Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. They took it further - hence Peter and the Starcatchers! The story begins with Peter and four other orphan boys placed on board a ship - the Never Land. The accommodations are wretched, the voyage even more so. Peter discovers a locked, guarded trunk with strange properties. A girl his age, Molly, seems to be the only other passenger aware of this trunk - and very possessive of it. Eventually she must trust Peter with her secret - the trunk is full of stardust. It cannot fall into the wrong hands. In short order, pirates, a storm more powerful usual, a small island, Mollusks, Mr. Grin, more pirates, mermaids - well, you catch my drift. This is a delightful book geared towards readers aged ten and up. I am definitely up. I look forward to the day I can Introduce my neice and nephews to this series. Off to find the book two.

  26. 5 out of 5

    AH

    Sync audio free download week of July 3, 2014. About 2.0 stars to 2.5 stars. Probably a better entertainment value for younger readers, Peter and the Starcatchers was a bit of a disappointment for me. I don't mind retellings, but this one just annoyed me a tad. It could be the narrator's voice - he was OK for most of the story, however he did do some truly cringe-worthy voices for some of the characters and I guess that put me off. In any case, this is a retelling of Peter Pan and goes back to t Sync audio free download week of July 3, 2014. About 2.0 stars to 2.5 stars. Probably a better entertainment value for younger readers, Peter and the Starcatchers was a bit of a disappointment for me. I don't mind retellings, but this one just annoyed me a tad. It could be the narrator's voice - he was OK for most of the story, however he did do some truly cringe-worthy voices for some of the characters and I guess that put me off. In any case, this is a retelling of Peter Pan and goes back to the days before Peter became Peter Pan. Captain Hook is Black Stashe, the meanest, ornery-est, most feared pirate of the seas. Smee is there as are some of the other characters, like the lost boys. No Wendy, unless I missed her somewhere. The giant croc is in this one too. I don't know, I just expected a little more from Dave Barry.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    I'm a sucker for anything "Peter Pan". The animated Disney film in 1953 is the first movie I can ever remember seeing in a theater, and I saw it 10 times over 2 days! I've seen just about every version there is, and even read the original book by James M. Barrie. "Peter and the Starcatchers"was the basis of the hit Broadway production back in 2012. I somehow managed to miss that one, but I highly recommend the book. It's a treat! Full of adventure, lots of action and a wry sense of humor, it ba I'm a sucker for anything "Peter Pan". The animated Disney film in 1953 is the first movie I can ever remember seeing in a theater, and I saw it 10 times over 2 days! I've seen just about every version there is, and even read the original book by James M. Barrie. "Peter and the Starcatchers"was the basis of the hit Broadway production back in 2012. I somehow managed to miss that one, but I highly recommend the book. It's a treat! Full of adventure, lots of action and a wry sense of humor, it backtracks to the days before Peter could fly, before Captain Hook lost his hand, and how Never Land came to be. This is the first of 9 collaborations with Ridley Pierson about the adventures of "The Boy Who Never Grew Up", and I intend to track them down.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Francesca

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed reading this book! For me, the beginning was good, but it was a little slow due to the fact that it was jam-packed with ship lingo. The story was there, though. But I must say that as soon as they got to the island it really picked up. After that, I enjoyed it very much!!! What I love about this book as I have said before is that it is not a retelling, it is a prequel to the classic story Peter Pan. The illustrations are also amazing, some of them so beautiful that I just stared for a I enjoyed reading this book! For me, the beginning was good, but it was a little slow due to the fact that it was jam-packed with ship lingo. The story was there, though. But I must say that as soon as they got to the island it really picked up. After that, I enjoyed it very much!!! What I love about this book as I have said before is that it is not a retelling, it is a prequel to the classic story Peter Pan. The illustrations are also amazing, some of them so beautiful that I just stared for a solid minute. The characters were well done, even if some of them weren't the nicest! I would recommend this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kerri (Book Hoarder)

    How did I not notice that I have this one?? It looks so interesting! ~*~*~ This book was thoroughly enjoyable. Lighter, more middle grade-ish, but a fun adventure with interesting world building, lots of humour and action. :D I'm sorry I let it sit neglected on my shelves for so long!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Miller

    When I read this the first time I laughed and finished it kind of quickly and decided it was a good throw away read. When I read it the second time, I laughed really hard. But not just laugh, there's actually suspense, grief, friendship, etc. All in all, this book does an adequate job of setting up Peter Pan (a personal favorite of mine) all the while being a fantastic stand alone novel. I haven't gotten to the rest of the series yet (coming soon though!) but I'm just very excited about it. This b When I read this the first time I laughed and finished it kind of quickly and decided it was a good throw away read. When I read it the second time, I laughed really hard. But not just laugh, there's actually suspense, grief, friendship, etc. All in all, this book does an adequate job of setting up Peter Pan (a personal favorite of mine) all the while being a fantastic stand alone novel. I haven't gotten to the rest of the series yet (coming soon though!) but I'm just very excited about it. This book impressed me on my second read, and I can't wait to get more from the story and characters. Speaking of characters, I thought they were surprisingly well crafted. Sure, none of them were super deep or anything, but this story relies on many different POVs (many of whom we aren't supposed to like) and balances them all very nicely. While we see Slank beating up the orphans during Peter's scene and decide he's a bad guy, we also see him stand up to Black Stache toe-to-toe, and decide maybe he's not a total waste. Overall, I was just very impressed at the way the authors created characters who all had good and bad sides, and used the characters to keep the story interesting. (Seriously, by the end of the book he had like six or seven different parties in play. Well outlined, this book.) The last chapter was kind of tied up too quickly. I'd have liked to have seen some of the emotions behind Peter's decision before he just blurted it out. (He is a POV character, after all.) But all in all, no complaints. Fun characters. A+ narrative voice. Well-woven plots and story arcs. All in all a pretty smash up, swashbuckling read. (Note: I don't usually give five stars unless a book changes the way I see life or the craft of writing, and this book did neither. However, it is still a favorite of mine, so I feel bad giving it any less. Lots and lots of laughs in here, generally made my life better while I read it. Can't say no to that.)

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