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Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

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When Kansas farm girl Dorothy flies away to the magical Land of Oz, she fatally flattens a wicked witch, liberates a living scarecrow and is hailed by the Munchkin people as a great sorceress but all she really wants to know is: how does she get home?


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When Kansas farm girl Dorothy flies away to the magical Land of Oz, she fatally flattens a wicked witch, liberates a living scarecrow and is hailed by the Munchkin people as a great sorceress but all she really wants to know is: how does she get home?

30 review for Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Wonderful work indeed! Creative Team: Writer: Eric Shanower (based on the original works by L. Frank Baum) Illustrator: Scottie Young TAKE THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD I love these adaptations published by Marvel Comics about the original books by L. Frank Baum. Without a doubt the creative team of, Eric Shanower writing and Scottie Young drawing, are the right choice to this wonderful task. They did a perfect job showing the classic tale as L. Frank Baum would make it, if he would be in the comics' busi Wonderful work indeed! Creative Team: Writer: Eric Shanower (based on the original works by L. Frank Baum) Illustrator: Scottie Young TAKE THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD I love these adaptations published by Marvel Comics about the original books by L. Frank Baum. Without a doubt the creative team of, Eric Shanower writing and Scottie Young drawing, are the right choice to this wonderful task. They did a perfect job showing the classic tale as L. Frank Baum would make it, if he would be in the comics' business nowadays. If you are only familiar with the classic film (that by the way, it was my first contact with the OZ world), it will be an excellent experience to read this graphic novel, since you can appreciate the original story by Baum, only adapted in a graphic presentation. Shanower is doing a masterful job taking the original texts of the prose novel and adaptating them into a comic book format without losing anything of the original tale. Scottie born to illustrate stories like this one and I can't think of anybody else better suited to this task. I am sure that projects like this one will be able to create a whole new generation of fans for the wonderful world of Oz along with charming quite again to the already fans of it. Highly recommended for readers of all ages.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    A long time passed since I read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and this graphic novel did a great job of reminding me just how wonderful the story was. If you're a fan of the original book, I recommend giving this graphic novel a try.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Vrlo lepa interpretacija originalne price. Lepi crtezi i boja, tempo i sve manje vise bitno za strip. I jako mi se svidja kako koriste kolorit da uticu na emocije, da bude suptilno a opet efektno. Odlican posao.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Seth T.

    In comics, a successful adaptation is ridiculously difficult to pull off. Actually, amend that: in any medium, a successful adaptation is ridiculously difficult to pull off. A good adaptation requires the successful transposition of a story's essence from one medium to another in a way that, while not damaging the source, makes uses of the new medium's unique properties in a way that justifies the new product. And it doesn't matter if a story is being transferred from stage to film or from film In comics, a successful adaptation is ridiculously difficult to pull off. Actually, amend that: in any medium, a successful adaptation is ridiculously difficult to pull off. A good adaptation requires the successful transposition of a story's essence from one medium to another in a way that, while not damaging the source, makes uses of the new medium's unique properties in a way that justifies the new product. And it doesn't matter if a story is being transferred from stage to film or from film to book or from book to film or from non-fiction to novel or from videogame to film: good adaptation is a rare commodity. And these are adaptations into established mediums, disciplines that have been explored and researched and tried and examined for a century or more. Comics don't have that luxury. The American graphic novel only began to approach being taken seriously by anyone outside its self-sustained genre-ghetto in the mid-'80s and only began to stretch its use and purpose in earnest around the turn of the 21st century. (Certainly there were efforts in the '60s and '70s—and even some interesting work in the Nineteen-Aughts—but these were exceptions within a medium largely uninterested in growth.) So it makes sense that comics would have far less grasp of its unique toolset than the cinema, which has been studied critically since the '40s at least. And with so light an understanding of what powers the medium of comics, we should expect successful adaptation in comics to be far more rare than successful adaptation in film. And so it is the case. While it is rare to see film adaptations that are both superlative works of cinematic genius and successful adaptations, we still see a handful of films like Fight Club, Rashomon, A Thousand Clowns, Snow Falling on Cedars, and Ran. Sadly (but not unexpectedly), the diligent and lenient might be able to count successful comics adaptations on the fingers of a single hand. Maybe on those of two, if generous. Of course, I may be here speaking from ignorance. It's entirely possible there are a host of excellent adaptations available, books that a) avoid the trap of overly scrupulous devotion to the source while b) pushing the use of the unique tapestry of tools the comics form suggests. I just can't really think of many. Edginton and Culbard's Sherlock Holmes adaptations have been getting increasingly better and Jiro Taniguchi's adapted excerpt from White Fang was exciting though not exceptional. Almost certainly the best I can think of is Eric Shanower's continuing work adapting the siege of Troy in Age of Bronze. His juggling of characters and judicious excising of the gods from that story prove his hand as a revisionist. So it was with some measure of excitement that I cautiously approached his Marvel adaptation of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Unfortunately, Shanower's Oz does not succeed so well as his Troy. At this point, a brief history of my acquaintance with Oz may be valuable. I'm not in any way a fan of Baum's world—frankly, I don't know enough about it to declare myself either friend or foe. I had, therefore, the vaguely unique opportunity to approach this adaptation without any immediate familiarity with its source material. I had neither read Baum's original work nor seen the Judy Garland vehicle. A couple years back, I did have the misfortune to read Maguire's Wicked for a book club, but I understand that work to be largely apocryphal. [I like to imagine that the speaker in this panel is the Wicked Witch herself, realizing too late and a little bit surprised that there is now a house monopolizing her torso.] Still, some of the Oz mythos has filtered down into society at large over the years and I am broadly aware of some of the first story's more famous bits. I knew of the yellow brick road—upon which I presumed the entire tale took place. I knew of the ruby slippers, though little more than that such shoes were extant. I knew that Dorothy arrived in a house that crushed a witch and have in mind the image of two spindly legs clothed in candy-cane-striped socks emerging from beneath its deadly weight. I knew of a quest for a heart, a brain, and some other thing. Perhaps a bladder. I knew that the villain melted and suspected it was due to some sort of molecular aquaphobia. And I knew that one ought pay no attention to the man behind the curtain. Beyond this, however, my affinity for Oz lore runs dry, so my approach to Marvel's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is almost as if it were not an adaptation at all, but instead an actual story. Which, when one thinks about it for a moment, is probably how all adaptations ought to be approached anyway. And so it is on this count—as a full-fledged story—that I judge The Wonderful Wizard of Oz diminished. The problem unfortunately falls squarely on Shanower's shoulders because there can be no fault at all found in Skottie Young's artwork. Young reimagines (so outside texts have informed me) Oz in such vibrant colour and form that it becomes glorious and beautiful and any number of other expressions one might hear an eager youth group director employ in describing heaven to his young charges. I was blown away by the forcefulness of Young's vision for Oz—the animals, the flora, the geography, the civilizations. These drawings were all so plainly wonderful that the failure of the text to capture a compelling story to go along with Young's visions is nearly tragic. The problem with Shanower's text is that despite having no predisposition toward reading The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as an adaptation, the book reads like an adaptation—and one requiring perhaps thirty more pages. The most glaring difficulty is the book's staccato rhythm of jolting from one point to the next. This is most evident in the first quarter of the book, from the touchdown of the twister through the gathering of Dorothy's quest companions. These pages are stilted and never fall into any kind of comfortable story tempo, as if there are a list of story points that must be met in a limited page count else the whole enterprise fail. And that may very well have been the fact of the matter. Perhaps Marvel could not spare an extra chapter to their series. Perhaps Shanower was unfairly hampered by editorial mandate. Whatever the case though, the result is a book that could have perhaps been excellent but instead suffers from potential unmet. The more I think on it, the more I believe that an extra chapter's worth of pages could have saved the book. As it is, Shanower relies too heavily on dialogue to exposit his story. There are a lot of word balloons filled with a lot of text. More pages may have allowed Shanower to judiciously pare down his text and allow Young's very able visuals to carry more of the story-load. Still, despite the obvious feeling that I was reading an adaptation, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz kept me interested. Some may even find the book worthwhile on the strength of the art alone. For my part, I'm interested to see how later volumes in the series of adaptations will play themselves out. Whether Shanower will grow more accustomed to the limitations of the medium and begin capitalizing more readily on its strengths remains to be proven, but I am excited to see how he fares—even if chiefly for the pleasure of witnessing more of Oz through Skottie Young's imagination. _________________ [Review courtesy of Good Ok Bad]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I am finding this book altogether and entirely too personally daunting and painful (not only because Eric Shadower's Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a graphic novel and I am just neither a fan of graphic novels in general nor do I tend to even be able to understand them as well and as throughly as traditional textual novels, but also, and perhaps even more importantly for me personally, the font size of the text there is, is just so miniscule that I am having huge vision and thus concentration I am finding this book altogether and entirely too personally daunting and painful (not only because Eric Shadower's Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a graphic novel and I am just neither a fan of graphic novels in general nor do I tend to even be able to understand them as well and as throughly as traditional textual novels, but also, and perhaps even more importantly for me personally, the font size of the text there is, is just so miniscule that I am having huge vision and thus concentration issues even whilst wearing my strongest reading glasses). I did quickly and cursively skim through Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and while Scottie Young's illustrations are, indeed, expressive and intense, I also find them more than a bit creepy and potentially frightening, so much so that the combination of for me too creepy illustrations, miniscule font size and the fact that I simply do not like graphic novels all that much anyhow is making me abandon this (I have always loved L. Frank Baum's Oz series of novels, but reading them without illustrations, or at least, without massive amounts of illustrations being thrust at me is much more, is in fact, vastly more enjoyable, and I do not see why I should continue and risk eye strain reading something that is proving to be simply a pain and not at all a pleasure). I do grudgingly appreciate the concept, but this is just not my cup of tea at all, and I respectfully, but gladly bow out. And I am also now even more leery of trying more graphic novels (and am certainly going to try to avoid those that sport minuscule fonts).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    I am as devoted an Ozite as any you are likely to see. I've read every last one of the Famous Forty, plus most of Baum's more or less related side books. I've seen the Judy Garland movie more times than I could count. (Yes, I love the books and the movie more or less equally.) One of the surest ways to get me to read or watch something is to tell me it has references to Oz. And so here I am. Shanower's adaptation is remarkably faithful, following the basic storyline rather closely. This may be a I am as devoted an Ozite as any you are likely to see. I've read every last one of the Famous Forty, plus most of Baum's more or less related side books. I've seen the Judy Garland movie more times than I could count. (Yes, I love the books and the movie more or less equally.) One of the surest ways to get me to read or watch something is to tell me it has references to Oz. And so here I am. Shanower's adaptation is remarkably faithful, following the basic storyline rather closely. This may be a bit of a failing. Baum was already showing the tendency to have brief episodes about such and so strange Ozite town, never to return to them again, most noticeably with the town made of china. I honestly expect this chapter to be cut from adapations, and yet here it is. Considering how clipped the overall action has to be to accomodate nearly every twist and turn of Baum's original, it might have made a better adaptation to cut out scenes like that. (Much as I like them in the original book.) For a hardcore Ozite (and it looks like Shanower is one of us), it's fun to see even the minor episodes in comic format, but probably less so for the casual fan. The art is exactly as on the cover. This I wasn't sure about when I started reading, and it took most of the book for me to warm up to Skottie Young's style. I did eventually end up liking it, but he's no John R. Neill. I will definitely be following the rest of the Oz adaptations, and I'd like it if Shanower would keep going through the rest of the Baum books. I'm especially excited about Oz: The Marvelous Land of Oz, since that's one of my favorites.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Koehne

    This comic adaptation of the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is rare on many levels. It might actually be better than the book itself! Most people have enjoyed the movie as a kid, but the book is a much more complicated story and in my mind much better than the movie. Shanower is able to keep the complexities of the original story while Young's art keeps the story on a whimsical level that all ages will enjoy. I've met Shanower a couple of times at comic conventions and he is a gifted storytelle This comic adaptation of the book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is rare on many levels. It might actually be better than the book itself! Most people have enjoyed the movie as a kid, but the book is a much more complicated story and in my mind much better than the movie. Shanower is able to keep the complexities of the original story while Young's art keeps the story on a whimsical level that all ages will enjoy. I've met Shanower a couple of times at comic conventions and he is a gifted storyteller. His Age of Bronze comic series is a great retelling of the Trojan War and is a must read for anyone interested in Greek Mythology. His experience in adapting this longer epic must have helped him greatly in taking Frank Baum's much shorter story, allowing him to pull out just the right pieces to keep the original flavor while also being new and fresh. I'm not as familiar with Skottie Young's art, but I'm impressed. All the characters in Oz stories are so iconic it's a difficult task for any artist to provide just the right amount of uniqueness while still keeping all the expected details. Young's Dorothy and Cowardly Lion and Scarecrow are just about as perfect as you could get - very stylized but no doubt still representative of the original characters. This is a great adaptation of a children's classic. If your kids have read the book, this is a great companion book to give them a visual interpretation of the story. If they haven't read the original book or have only seen the movie, I'd actually think reading this adaptation would be more enjoyable as a starting point into the Oz world.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    It was after finishing reading this comics adaptation of the beloved L. Frank Baum tale that I realized that Eric Shanower has earlier done well received Oz graphic novels. He was most suited for this new release from the Marvel Illustrated line of comics adaptations of classic literary works. But I came to read this graphic novel because of the work of Skottie Young. Young’s art, almost ephemeral and whimsical will carry you through Oz as if you are part of Dorothy’s party of odd friends. His ar It was after finishing reading this comics adaptation of the beloved L. Frank Baum tale that I realized that Eric Shanower has earlier done well received Oz graphic novels. He was most suited for this new release from the Marvel Illustrated line of comics adaptations of classic literary works. But I came to read this graphic novel because of the work of Skottie Young. Young’s art, almost ephemeral and whimsical will carry you through Oz as if you are part of Dorothy’s party of odd friends. His art suits the story, an American fairy tale, and gives it a modern edge as well. It evokes the timeless story of its origin and appeals modern sensibilities and new fans with its playfulness with a style that reminds you of underground art and wall graffiti. This adaptation is great way to introduce new young readers to Baum’s classic.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Furrawn

    Loved it.... Found it because I love Skottie Young. If you love Oz or Graphic novels you can't go wrong. If you love both, you'll be enchanted! I need to read the others in the series. I meant to do so...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coos Burton

    Vendían estos comics en la Feria Internacional del Libro a un precio completamente accesible, y cuando lo hojee me encantaron las ilustraciones que tiene. Se trata de uno de los clasicos ilustrados Marvel, la popular historia de la pobre Dorothy, quien fue alejada de sus tíos; Toto, el pequeño perrito de Dorothy; el hombre de hojalata, quien no tiene un corazón con el cual amar; el león, quien por ser el rey de la selva no cuenta con suficiente valor; y mi preferido en esta preciosa edición, el Vendían estos comics en la Feria Internacional del Libro a un precio completamente accesible, y cuando lo hojee me encantaron las ilustraciones que tiene. Se trata de uno de los clasicos ilustrados Marvel, la popular historia de la pobre Dorothy, quien fue alejada de sus tíos; Toto, el pequeño perrito de Dorothy; el hombre de hojalata, quien no tiene un corazón con el cual amar; el león, quien por ser el rey de la selva no cuenta con suficiente valor; y mi preferido en esta preciosa edición, el espantapájaros, es cual no tiene un cerebro para pensar por sí mismo. Éste último personaje resultó de mis predilectos ya que tiene características que se asemejan enormemente a las de los personajes de Tim Burton, y como sabrán, amo el arte de Tim. Fui leyendo un número por noche hasta que francamente no resistí y terminé por leerlos todos juntos, porque la historia es genial y quería conocer más el trazo del artista que le dio más vida a estos singulares personajes. Plus, el comic es una fiel adaptación a la historia original. Amé que respetaran tanto los diálogos y las ideas generales.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Malapata

    Una auténtica joya. Muy fiel al relato original, manteniendo su sentido del humor y completado con unos estupendos dibujos de Skottie Young, al que hay que aplaudir especialmente los diseños de los personajes. Dibujos cargados de expresividad que ayudan a encariñarse con unos personajes únicos.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Megan (ReadingRover)

    Great twist on a classic story. Amazing illustrations by Skottie Young. Can’t wait to read the rest of the series!

  13. 5 out of 5

    A Voracious Reader (a.k.a. Carol)

    *Book source ~ Library So, a synopsis. It’s the freakin’ Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Do I really need to recap this? Ok, I will. Dorothy lives with her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em on a farm in Kansas. She has a dog named Toto. A tornado (called a cyclone here) comes along sweeping Dorothy and Toto to the Land of Oz where Dorothy spends her time making unusual friends and trying to get back to Kansas. First off, omg, the artwork is fantastic! It’s so adorable and the colors are perfect. I loved it. The sto *Book source ~ Library So, a synopsis. It’s the freakin’ Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Do I really need to recap this? Ok, I will. Dorothy lives with her Uncle Henry and Aunt Em on a farm in Kansas. She has a dog named Toto. A tornado (called a cyclone here) comes along sweeping Dorothy and Toto to the Land of Oz where Dorothy spends her time making unusual friends and trying to get back to Kansas. First off, omg, the artwork is fantastic! It’s so adorable and the colors are perfect. I loved it. The story is pretty good, too. I hate to admit that I’ve never actually read the book (it’s on my TBR, honest!), so I’m not sure how faithful the adaptation is. And I haven’t seen the movie in quite some time, but the graphic novel does differ a bit from it. If you liked the movie and the book then this graphic novel is a must read. The art alone is worth it. Trust me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    My favorite comic book store is Atomic Comics in Mesa, right next to Bookman's. It can make for a fun but wallet-draining day to make a trip down there and stop at both stores. Last time I was at Atomic Comics, I picked up an introduction to this and the Joe Hill comic book series Locke & Key. They were part of the $1 collection on the wall, of introductions and special issues put out by publishers for a buck. After I read that, I knew I had to read the whole thing. At first, I thought the dr My favorite comic book store is Atomic Comics in Mesa, right next to Bookman's. It can make for a fun but wallet-draining day to make a trip down there and stop at both stores. Last time I was at Atomic Comics, I picked up an introduction to this and the Joe Hill comic book series Locke & Key. They were part of the $1 collection on the wall, of introductions and special issues put out by publishers for a buck. After I read that, I knew I had to read the whole thing. At first, I thought the drawings were going to be a little too cutesy, too little-kiddy. But there's much more to the artwork than that. It manages to be cute, dark, and unsettling all at once. I haven't read the novel, but from what I have read and seen of Oz, this comic stays very close to it. I really enjoyed it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lora

    I absolutely loved the graphics in this book, but I felt the diagolue was a bit forced. It was awkward and at times took away from the awesome imagery. I did like that this version of The Wizard of Oz followed L. Frank Baum's version and not the movie. I can see many children reading this and being surprised by how the story flows. I think this is a great way to reintroduce a classic to children that don't want to take the time to read the true story (BUT they really should read the original bef I absolutely loved the graphics in this book, but I felt the diagolue was a bit forced. It was awkward and at times took away from the awesome imagery. I did like that this version of The Wizard of Oz followed L. Frank Baum's version and not the movie. I can see many children reading this and being surprised by how the story flows. I think this is a great way to reintroduce a classic to children that don't want to take the time to read the true story (BUT they really should read the original before reading this).

  16. 4 out of 5

    P'tit Yahourt

    Après avoir lu Rocket & Groot et I Hate Fairyland de Skottie Young, j’avais besoin d'en lire plus de cet auteur et dessinateur incroyable. C’est pour cela que j’ai sauté sur l’occasion lorsque j’ai vu le tome 1 de l’adaptation de l’œuvre de L. Frank Baum, Le Magicien d’Oz dessiné par Skottie Young, écrit par Éric Shanower et mis en couleur par Jean-François Beaulieu... [CHRONIQUE] -> http://pugoscope.fr/1231-oz-review/

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cabezabajo

    Me enamoré de este libro en cuanto lo vi en la librería y una vez leído las razones están más que justificadas. Es una verdadera gozada entrar en Oz a través de las ilustraciones de Skottie Young. Si tenéis la oportunidad no la dejéis pasar.

  18. 3 out of 5

    Josh

    I picked up this book solely for Skottie Young's art, and I was not disappointed. Having never actually read the Oz novels, I can't speak how this adaptation compares to the source material--though I get the impression it is pretty close. I don't have strong feelings on the story itself. There's a lot of childhood nostalgia associated with the film, but the books are their own thing in a lot of ways--darker, wilder, sillier. I had not problems with the story overall, and it was interesting to enc I picked up this book solely for Skottie Young's art, and I was not disappointed. Having never actually read the Oz novels, I can't speak how this adaptation compares to the source material--though I get the impression it is pretty close. I don't have strong feelings on the story itself. There's a lot of childhood nostalgia associated with the film, but the books are their own thing in a lot of ways--darker, wilder, sillier. I had not problems with the story overall, and it was interesting to encounter pieces of it that have been largely forgotten by popular culture. But the real triumph of this adaptation is in the art. I am a huge fan of Young's work. His illustrations here are cartoonish and whimsical in perfect accompaniment to the story, but with a definite creepiness at times that is also well suited to the content. Young brings the tale to life with excellent flair and detail, bringing his own flavor to the characters in a way that also feels true the basics of who they are. This book is a visual delight, especially for those who enjoy Young's artistic style.

  19. 3 out of 5

    Garance L.J. Bonadonna (The Nerdy Bookseller)

    4.5 STARS What a wonderful adaptation of the original story of Oz. I have never read the books, but I have a lasting memory of the movie and this comic was so much better. They probably did a better job at adaptation the essence of the story, the colors and the endless possibilities of a fantasy world. I'm a huge fan of Skottie Young's work and as usual he did not disappoint. It was a wonderful mix of beautiful, fairy-like, creepy and monstrous. I loved it. Sometimes the story was going in round that 4.5 STARS What a wonderful adaptation of the original story of Oz. I have never read the books, but I have a lasting memory of the movie and this comic was so much better. They probably did a better job at adaptation the essence of the story, the colors and the endless possibilities of a fantasy world. I'm a huge fan of Skottie Young's work and as usual he did not disappoint. It was a wonderful mix of beautiful, fairy-like, creepy and monstrous. I loved it. Sometimes the story was going in round that's why I didn't give it 5 stars, but I would definitely recommend it. It's a fast and pleasant read. I had a great time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    Just skimmed for the art, I read the book recently and want to continue on with the graphic novels instead of the books.

  21. 3 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Reason for Reading: Well, a bit of a story. This first came to my attention when it was nominated for the Cybils '09 Graphic Novel Award. The publisher did not send review copies and none of us judges were able to obtain copies. This year The Marvelous Land of Oz was nominated for a Cybils '10 Award and again the same thing happened so I decided to try my luck with putting an Inter-library Loan in for the this first one again. And well, I've just now received it and been able to read it. This is Reason for Reading: Well, a bit of a story. This first came to my attention when it was nominated for the Cybils '09 Graphic Novel Award. The publisher did not send review copies and none of us judges were able to obtain copies. This year The Marvelous Land of Oz was nominated for a Cybils '10 Award and again the same thing happened so I decided to try my luck with putting an Inter-library Loan in for the this first one again. And well, I've just now received it and been able to read it. This is a fantastic rendition of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz! The story is true to the original and will surprise many folks whose only exposure to the story is from the old Judy Garland movie. All the wonderful characters they meet on their journey are here: the Queen of the field mice, the people made out of China, the Kalidahs, and the rest and then we have the *silver* shoes, the enchanted cap that calls the flying monkeys to do the bearers bidding, the true, gruesome story of how the tinman became tin, along with all the killing. My, there really is a lot of killing in this story. Everything that makes the book such a wonderful story has been included no matter how small. Now some parts have been skimmed over, while others got the full treatment which is only to be expected but I'm very pleased at how true this adaptation is. The artwork is splendid. I'm not familiar with Young's work before this but he has captured the true essence of the characters in his drawings and brought them to life. Dorothy is pure farm girl, cute but doesn't take any guff. The scarecrow is perfect. He is quite a self-involved fellow when it comes down it and he's got the look of a rather dim-witted know-it-all farmer. The Tinman is my favourite! He has been represented as an actual man made out of tin. His human face complete with mustache leaves no forgetting that he once was a human being. Then there is the Cowardly lion who will probably find favour with many readers; he is a great, big, round puffball who carries himself with pride. None of Young's illustrations have taken elements from either Denslow or the movie versions, giving completely new and wonderful representations of these very well-know characters. A must read for Oz fans!

  22. 5 out of 5

    EZRead eBookstore

    Despite my initial skepticism of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" being turned into a comic book, it would seem that transforming this children's story into a graphic novel has made a refreshing rendition. Since Baum's original series was intended for children and the graphic novel is aimed at children, the new alteration makes for a near-perfect transformation. Slap a classic into a shiny paperback full of colorful sketches and a modernly familiar format is a tactic that can definitely make this ol Despite my initial skepticism of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" being turned into a comic book, it would seem that transforming this children's story into a graphic novel has made a refreshing rendition. Since Baum's original series was intended for children and the graphic novel is aimed at children, the new alteration makes for a near-perfect transformation. Slap a classic into a shiny paperback full of colorful sketches and a modernly familiar format is a tactic that can definitely make this old story more accepting to the new generation. As a fan of adventure and fantasy, "The Wonderful Wizard of OZ" provides all of the right creativity. Beautiful and scary settings are depicted through both the bright and dreary images sketched throughout the pages. While morals like bravery, friendship, and intelligence are main themes of the story, the tale does not come across as didactic since these are common themes to fairy tales. Some of the repetitive framing may seem a bit juvenile for older readers, so keep in mind that this comic is aimed at younger readers. Although most people are probably familiar with the story of Dorothy Gail, fans of the movie will find discrepancies in details of the story: the color of Dorothy's slippers, the intentions of the flying monkeys, and the emerald city's origin. Of course, these discrepancies will only disturb those who are comparing the comic to the movie. Sadly, few people may realize that Shanower's version of "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" follows Baum's original series more closely than the movie. However, true fans of Baum will appreciate the differences. Shanower may have taken a few modern creative liberties with his graphic novel, but they are not nearly so extreme as that of the movie. Featured in bright colors and modern sketches, a new generation of children are given the chance to fall in-love with "The Wonderful Wizard of OZ" with the help of graphic novel. EZ Read Staffer Amelia

  23. 3 out of 5

    Erik

    It was at first surprising, and even sad, when I learned that Shanower – the best known comics adaptor of the famed L. Frank Baum Oz books – opted not to illustrate his first Marvel OZ project; although I am sure he is more than busy juggling the writing duties for this series along with both writing and illustrating his own Age of Bronze for Image. However, once I was several pages into this beautiful hardback, I was swept away by the mercurial and whimsical art of up-and-coming comic artist Sc It was at first surprising, and even sad, when I learned that Shanower – the best known comics adaptor of the famed L. Frank Baum Oz books – opted not to illustrate his first Marvel OZ project; although I am sure he is more than busy juggling the writing duties for this series along with both writing and illustrating his own Age of Bronze for Image. However, once I was several pages into this beautiful hardback, I was swept away by the mercurial and whimsical art of up-and-coming comic artist Scottie Young. Young’s sketchy style, combined with the brilliant coloring by Jean-Francois Beaulieu, recalls the charm of Amy Thompson’s Scary Godmother and Michael Avon Oeming’s Mice Templar; with a touch of anime and steampunk aesthetics thrown in for good measure. I particularly adore his interpretation of the Cowardly Lion, who comes across at a giant baby-faced pussy cat, and the fierce visage of the omnipotent and all-knowing Oz – who, as we all know, is a humbug in disguise. Although I have never read Baum’s first Oz novel – though I recall reading his second book, The Marvelous Land of Oz, for some odd reason – I take it from the overwhelmingly positive reviews that Shanower and Young have crafted a remarkably faithful adaptation. (Take, for example, that they ditch the cinematic ruby slippers for the original silver ones – among other more faithful renderings.) The commercial success of this adaptation, which just may garner an Eisner nomination this next year at Comic-Con, helped pave the way for an adaptation of the second Oz book – premiering soon on comic-stands. And, yes, you guessed rightly that I’ll be there for Shanower and Young’s second journey down the yellow brick road.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Alicia

    Up to this point, my knowledge of the world of Oz has come from the Judy Garland movie and the 1985 sequel "Return to Oz". The original novel is on my to-read list, but I haven't yet had the opportunity. What I appreciate about this graphic novel is that (from what's said in the intro) it stays truer to the story of the novel than that of the movie. Although the story is compelling, it's also rather a familiar world. It does, however, make more sense of the novel Wicked for me. What truly makes t Up to this point, my knowledge of the world of Oz has come from the Judy Garland movie and the 1985 sequel "Return to Oz". The original novel is on my to-read list, but I haven't yet had the opportunity. What I appreciate about this graphic novel is that (from what's said in the intro) it stays truer to the story of the novel than that of the movie. Although the story is compelling, it's also rather a familiar world. It does, however, make more sense of the novel Wicked for me. What truly makes this stand out as a 5-star book is the fantastic artwork of Skottie Young. By turns whimsical, weird and downright terrifying - but always wonderful, he brings to life the entire spectrum of Oz. The tin man is, by far, my favorite rendering with his shiny bald head, epic tin moustache and his spindly, cylindrical arms and legs. He reminds me of a kindly, old grandfather. I keep flipping through the pages as I write this review and I keep finding things to fall in love with on every page. Each of the characters were designed intentionally, and the end of the book includes some of Skottie Young's sketches in the design process. I'll end this review with my favorite lines which happens when Dorothy and crew meet the Cowardly Lion and is regarding Toto: "What's that little animal you are so tender of?" "He's my dog, Toto." "Is he made of tin, or stuffed? "Neither. He's a - a - a meat dog."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tally

    I'm not a fan of comic books or graphic novels, never have been. I've been a fan of The Wizard of Oz for as long as I can remember, and still, I had no intention of purchasing a graphic version of it when I found one at the bookshop. And then I made the mistake of leafing through it, and it was love of first sight. I don’t even know where to begin with this one. I was reading it in awe of the illustrator's skills which brought the story of Oz to life in a new, different, refreshing way. The illus I'm not a fan of comic books or graphic novels, never have been. I've been a fan of The Wizard of Oz for as long as I can remember, and still, I had no intention of purchasing a graphic version of it when I found one at the bookshop. And then I made the mistake of leafing through it, and it was love of first sight. I don’t even know where to begin with this one. I was reading it in awe of the illustrator's skills which brought the story of Oz to life in a new, different, refreshing way. The illustrations are absolutely breathtaking. I found myself wanting to read slowly to really appreciate the drawings, but at the same time I couldn’t help rushing through it in expectation to find out what was coming next. As I was reading, I couldn’t help falling into Baum's tale yet again. I wanted to forget any academic analysis I've ever read about this book, and just pretended it was nothing but an innocent fairytale. Easily done, in this case. Almost too easily. And what do you know? I just might start reading graphic novels more often now. Everyone should read this book. It's simply, well, wonderful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Bandel

    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, adapted by Eric Shanower, illustrated by Skottie Young, published 2009. High fantasy. Graphic novel in full color. Grades 5-8. Found via the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, winner of Best Publication for Kids, 2010. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz adapts L. Frank Baum's classic tale of Dorothy being carried to the land of Oz by a tornado. While Dorothy searches for a way home, she gains three companions: the Scarecrow, the Lion, and the Tin Woodman. This com The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, adapted by Eric Shanower, illustrated by Skottie Young, published 2009. High fantasy. Graphic novel in full color. Grades 5-8. Found via the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, winner of Best Publication for Kids, 2010. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz adapts L. Frank Baum's classic tale of Dorothy being carried to the land of Oz by a tornado. While Dorothy searches for a way home, she gains three companions: the Scarecrow, the Lion, and the Tin Woodman. This comic follows Baum's original text closely, keeping in many plot developments and much character development that did not make it into the classic film version. The comic is clearly made for a younger audience, as much of the narration parallels the illustrations, making it easier for younger readers to follow along with the narrative. The bright, imaginative illustrations are the best part of this illustration, but it would be nice for the images to have a less-cramped layout and more room to breathe. Readers should be warned of some scary imagery and a little graphic violence.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku

    A beautiful adaption of Frank Oz's classic story. Unlike many Oz adaptions, this one is remarkably faithful to the original novel. Thus far, also a well-crafted adaptation. Adaptations are a challenge. The audience often has a preconceived notion of how things should look, move, and feel. It's not an easy task to get your audience to forget those in place for your medium. The artwork is beautiful. Kudos to Skottie Young for taking iconic American literary characters who have already been engraine A beautiful adaption of Frank Oz's classic story. Unlike many Oz adaptions, this one is remarkably faithful to the original novel. Thus far, also a well-crafted adaptation. Adaptations are a challenge. The audience often has a preconceived notion of how things should look, move, and feel. It's not an easy task to get your audience to forget those in place for your medium. The artwork is beautiful. Kudos to Skottie Young for taking iconic American literary characters who have already been engrained as a specific image in people's minds and transforming those characters into his own. His characters have their own life and breath which is immediately visible. In fact, thus far, my favorite character is little Toto. In the film and original book, he is often omitted completely from the scene/text. However, in this graphic novel we see him in most scenes. While he might be doing something useful, more often than not Toto is merely enjoying doggy life. Volume One ends with Dorothy and Toto joining up with The Scarecrow. We have a long way to go, and I look forward to our journey there.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    The pairing of these two gentlemen was genius! I only have a remembrance of the actions of Judy Garland in the movie adaptation of this story. But, after reading snippets of the original book written by L. Frank Baum, I see that Shanower did a fine job at staying inside the original story line. His additions gave the story a nice refreshing look to the original. I loved that this was a graphic novel. The illustrations and color pallet were PHENOMINAL. I could go on and on about the artwork in th The pairing of these two gentlemen was genius! I only have a remembrance of the actions of Judy Garland in the movie adaptation of this story. But, after reading snippets of the original book written by L. Frank Baum, I see that Shanower did a fine job at staying inside the original story line. His additions gave the story a nice refreshing look to the original. I loved that this was a graphic novel. The illustrations and color pallet were PHENOMINAL. I could go on and on about the artwork in this book it really made the story come alive. If the art were to be removed the book would not be as amazing. I will definitely add this to my “must buy” book list to add to my library for school aged children. I could definitely see myself using this in a classroom where we can learn lessons on getting an education, feelings, and bravery. The way this book folds out into something that looks like a comic book may give children a new outlook on how books are written differently and not all are just one page of written text and the next are pictures. I would definitely recommend this book to others.

  29. 3 out of 5

    Astrid Paramita

    I have to start off by saying I don't usually read graphic novels. But I do like this book, mostly because of the wonderful illustrations of the character (especially LOVED the Cowardly Lion!). Unfortunately it's been a long while since I've read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz book so I couldn't really say anything about how true it was with the original, etc. All I know, this is a wonderful retelling of the story, with wonderful interpretation of the characters. I also really enjoy the afterword, wh I have to start off by saying I don't usually read graphic novels. But I do like this book, mostly because of the wonderful illustrations of the character (especially LOVED the Cowardly Lion!). Unfortunately it's been a long while since I've read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz book so I couldn't really say anything about how true it was with the original, etc. All I know, this is a wonderful retelling of the story, with wonderful interpretation of the characters. I also really enjoy the afterword, where the author and illustrator wrote about their process in making this adaptation. It makes me appreciate the story and the process even more. Overall I would recommend this book if you're an Oz fan, or you would enjoy a graphic novel from a classic story with wonderful, uplifting, and modern take on the characters :).

  30. 3 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The illustrators of this graphic novel did a nice job at holding to the original Baum story. There were silver shoes, enslaved flying monkeys and an allusion to Toto's ability to talk. The illustrations were tight and consistent. I really liked the creators' vision of the scarecrow and lion. They were modern, playful and the scarecrow was a touch haunting. The book jacket says it is a children's novel. However, my son thought the illustrations were rather frightening. Granted, he is three... I thi The illustrators of this graphic novel did a nice job at holding to the original Baum story. There were silver shoes, enslaved flying monkeys and an allusion to Toto's ability to talk. The illustrations were tight and consistent. I really liked the creators' vision of the scarecrow and lion. They were modern, playful and the scarecrow was a touch haunting. The book jacket says it is a children's novel. However, my son thought the illustrations were rather frightening. Granted, he is three... I think parents should consider the sensitivity and imagination of their child before allowing them to set off on their own with the novel. For those who love stunning graphics and simple story telling, this fun little gem of artistry is for you!

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