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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? 2

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Worldwide best-selling sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick's award-winning Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has been called "a masterpiece ahead of its time, even today" and served as the basis for the film Blade Runner. Boom! Studios is honored to present Volume 2 of the deluxe hardcover edition taking the novel and transplanting it into the comic book medium. A ground-break Worldwide best-selling sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick's award-winning Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has been called "a masterpiece ahead of its time, even today" and served as the basis for the film Blade Runner. Boom! Studios is honored to present Volume 2 of the deluxe hardcover edition taking the novel and transplanting it into the comic book medium. A ground-breaking maxi-series experiment, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is illustrated by acclaimed artist Tony Parker. Collects issues 5–8.


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Worldwide best-selling sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick's award-winning Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has been called "a masterpiece ahead of its time, even today" and served as the basis for the film Blade Runner. Boom! Studios is honored to present Volume 2 of the deluxe hardcover edition taking the novel and transplanting it into the comic book medium. A ground-break Worldwide best-selling sci-fi writer Philip K. Dick's award-winning Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? has been called "a masterpiece ahead of its time, even today" and served as the basis for the film Blade Runner. Boom! Studios is honored to present Volume 2 of the deluxe hardcover edition taking the novel and transplanting it into the comic book medium. A ground-breaking maxi-series experiment, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is illustrated by acclaimed artist Tony Parker. Collects issues 5–8.

30 review for Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? 2

  1. 3 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    I like the cover artwork of Bill Sienkiewicz better than the art of Tony Parker in this series, which I am not (I think) going to continue reading, having discovered that it involves several volumes and is essentially an illustrated novelization instead of a true graphic novel. I highly suggest, if you are a science fiction fan, reading the original novel for all its layered complexity, rather than this book, big and glossy and deluxe as it is). (I reviewed the original novel recently). As with I like the cover artwork of Bill Sienkiewicz better than the art of Tony Parker in this series, which I am not (I think) going to continue reading, having discovered that it involves several volumes and is essentially an illustrated novelization instead of a true graphic novel. I highly suggest, if you are a science fiction fan, reading the original novel for all its layered complexity, rather than this book, big and glossy and deluxe as it is). (I reviewed the original novel recently). As with the first volume, the package includes a series of appended letters and short reflections, none of them memorable. As you may know, Dick's Androids was the inspiration for Blade Runner (1982) so it's fun to--as I did--read it and then see the film.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Patryx

    Meno testo rispetto al primo volume e più spazio narrativo lasciato alle immagini, rimane comunque una degna trasposizione del romanzo di Dick.

  3. 3 out of 5

    Elizabeth A

    Below is my review of the first volume, and it applies to this installment of the series as well. I've seen the Blade Runner movie several times, and was curious to read the book the movie is based on. What I did not realize is that this is not a graphic novel in the classic sense of the word. It is really an illustrated novel; it contains the text of the novel in its entirely. As you might imagine, this leads to some clunky solutions as every descriptive word, scene setup, etc. are faithfully ca Below is my review of the first volume, and it applies to this installment of the series as well. I've seen the Blade Runner movie several times, and was curious to read the book the movie is based on. What I did not realize is that this is not a graphic novel in the classic sense of the word. It is really an illustrated novel; it contains the text of the novel in its entirely. As you might imagine, this leads to some clunky solutions as every descriptive word, scene setup, etc. are faithfully captured, while at the same time the art show you what you are actually reading. It does not work well in my opinion. I quite like the art, and really like the story, but though I also read the next volume in this series, as I already had it in hand, I'm abandoning the comic series, and plan to finish up by reading the novel itself.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arjun Kamath

    For some weird reason, I had thought this book to be critic on humanoid technology. I was glad to have been proven wrong. I completed this book in almost record time. I loved the idea of empathy being the only true differentiator between human and machine and was relieved to see it kept intact till the end. I felt that people's obsession with pets and religion, though well described, lacked substance. Overall a fantastic read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

    I'm not your normal Sci Fi reader. The last one I read was when I was still at school and Sci-Fi books were littered with macho heroes with Blasters or Needle Freezer guns. I am also that other rare beast, a man who has never seen Bladerunner. It was the title, more than anything else, that drew me to the book. It's a futuristic philosophical question and the reason for choosing it becomes clear as you start to read the book. Philip K Dick has created a version of earth where the ultimate world w I'm not your normal Sci Fi reader. The last one I read was when I was still at school and Sci-Fi books were littered with macho heroes with Blasters or Needle Freezer guns. I am also that other rare beast, a man who has never seen Bladerunner. It was the title, more than anything else, that drew me to the book. It's a futuristic philosophical question and the reason for choosing it becomes clear as you start to read the book. Philip K Dick has created a version of earth where the ultimate world war has destroyed most life. The pressure is to emigrate to the Martian Colonies where the authorities will give you, as an inducement, the android of your choice. The androids are biological sentient beings which resemble humans so closely that special tests have been developed to identify them. Dick's hero Decker is a bounty hunter, someone paid to find delinquent androids which have made there way back to earth and "retire" them. The book follows Decker on his quest to retire six renegade androids which have been equipped with a brain so advanced it is feared the tests may no longer identify them. That in itself provides a nice little story but there is a deeper more philosophical subplot. Is Android life real life? Decker dreams of owning real animals. Do androids have similar desires? There are holes in the plot and inconsistencies with the android characters, but it's still an intriguing book and well worth a read.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” VOLUME 2 Philip Dick held a deep sense of empathy! His book title is not “counting sheep to go to sleep”, but I suspect dreaming as in a goal, a longing, a dream for having an empathetic relationship, friendship, companion, pet. Like David confronted by Nathan (from Scripture) this story evokes the necessity of empathy. Androids don't feel empathy. Hence, the title is a question that drives the plot. Will we find out the answer by book's end? - - - “Human and a “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” VOLUME 2 Philip Dick held a deep sense of empathy! His book title is not “counting sheep to go to sleep”, but I suspect dreaming as in a goal, a longing, a dream for having an empathetic relationship, friendship, companion, pet. Like David confronted by Nathan (from Scripture) this story evokes the necessity of empathy. Androids don't feel empathy. Hence, the title is a question that drives the plot. Will we find out the answer by book's end? - - - “Human and animal suffering make me mad; whenever one of my cats dies I curse God and I mean it; I feel fury at him. I'd like to get him here where I could interrogate him, tell him that I think the world is screwed up, that man didn't sin and fall but was pushed— which is bad enough— but was then sold the lie that he is basically sinful, which I know he is not. I have known all kinds of people (I turned fifty a while ago and I'm angry about that; I've lived a long time), and those were by and large good people. I model the characters in my novels and stories on them. Now and again one of these people dies, and that makes me mad—really mad, as mad as I can get. 'You took my cat,' I want to say to God, 'and then you took my girlfriend. What are you doing? Listen to me; listen! It's wrong what you're doing.'” - Introduction to "The Golden Man" by Philip K. Dick - - - BOOK FIVE Isidore: “Don't dead bodies decay or something?” BOOK SIX: Bryant: “... But there can't be even one slip-up.” Rick: “There never could be in andy hunting. This is no different.” “Using an infinity key, which analyzed and opened all forms of locks known, he entered Polokov's apartment, laser beam in hand.” BOOK SEVEN: “His adrenal gland, by degrees, ceased pumping its several secretions into his bloodstream; his heart slowed to normal, his breathing became less frantic. But he still shook, anyhow I made myself a thousand dollars just now, he informed himself. So it was worth it.” BOOK EIGHT: “A new type of android that apparently nobody can handle but me.” - - -

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jorge de la Vega

    Okay, given how faithfully this series follows the source material, I will not get into specifics about the plot or themes or everything else we already know and love about the original novel, but rather regard the art style. Also, since I can't just review issue by issue, as they are part of a whole, I'll just copy/paste the following for each one. The art is, to put it simply, gorgeous, and in perfect harmony with the aesthetic Philip K. Dick attempted to imprint into his work through an, admi Okay, given how faithfully this series follows the source material, I will not get into specifics about the plot or themes or everything else we already know and love about the original novel, but rather regard the art style. Also, since I can't just review issue by issue, as they are part of a whole, I'll just copy/paste the following for each one. The art is, to put it simply, gorgeous, and in perfect harmony with the aesthetic Philip K. Dick attempted to imprint into his work through an, admittedly, rather stoic prose which left a lot of things open to interpretation (as envisioned by Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, my favorite movie of all time). The balance between color and shade, as well as the vivid representation of scenes we could only but interpret in the novel makes this dystopic future come alive in the best possible way while differentiating itself from the aforementioned movie adaptation. This is, indeed, a whole new way to experience and all-too-familiar story, revisit its themes and thought-provoking imagery, and appreciate it all over again. Thoroughly enjoyed this comic book adaptation, I really did.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Mike

    I just listened to the audiobook of DADOES?, and this is a very interesting adaptation. Everything in PKD's story is written again in the graphic novel, as text within the visual frames. The art evokes a more 'modern' future; since PKD had not seen the growth of personal computers, cell phones, and other common gadgetry, there was something missing in the written story, that the graphic novel captures extremely well. The adaptation falls slightly short, here also in the art work. Everyone in the I just listened to the audiobook of DADOES?, and this is a very interesting adaptation. Everything in PKD's story is written again in the graphic novel, as text within the visual frames. The art evokes a more 'modern' future; since PKD had not seen the growth of personal computers, cell phones, and other common gadgetry, there was something missing in the written story, that the graphic novel captures extremely well. The adaptation falls slightly short, here also in the art work. Everyone in the story is slightly flawed, and the flaws are exaggerated in PKD's questioning of what it means to be human. When the artist goes to draw this, ther seems to be a tendancy to draw the 'superhero' stereotypes: women are all weel-formed and attractive, the hero looks strong and virile; the lesser characters are physically weaker. This makes it hard to perceive the emotional impact of the plot. Still, worth the read and worth the wait for the last few volumes to come out.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is a continuation of the graphic novel adaptation of Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep. Check out my review of Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep Vol. 1 for my thoughts on the first volume. I'm not sure what more there is to say. The adaptation continues to be an amazing merger of Philip K. Dick's story and some amazing artwork. When all is said and done, I think the graphic novel might just be the definitive way to experience the story. Everything is just so close to perfect in how the a This is a continuation of the graphic novel adaptation of Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep. Check out my review of Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep Vol. 1 for my thoughts on the first volume. I'm not sure what more there is to say. The adaptation continues to be an amazing merger of Philip K. Dick's story and some amazing artwork. When all is said and done, I think the graphic novel might just be the definitive way to experience the story. Everything is just so close to perfect in how the artists interpreted Dick's words - the universe has been brought to life in a way I could never have imagined.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Randy Hunt

    This was a good book. As it is the inspiration for the movie Blade Runner, I thought the story would be familiar but anticipated enough detail to be interesting. The book and movie are very different, in good ways. The movie took the main character, Rick Decker, the bounty hunter and the premise of tracking and retiring fugitive androids. The rest of the storylines diverge significantly. The book examines the issue of what it means to be human, global religion and the impact of global nuclear wa This was a good book. As it is the inspiration for the movie Blade Runner, I thought the story would be familiar but anticipated enough detail to be interesting. The book and movie are very different, in good ways. The movie took the main character, Rick Decker, the bounty hunter and the premise of tracking and retiring fugitive androids. The rest of the storylines diverge significantly. The book examines the issue of what it means to be human, global religion and the impact of global nuclear war. If you enjoyed the movie, the book is definitely worth reading. If you didn't care for the movie, the book is still worth reading.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Gene

    While I saw Blade Runner many moons ago, I never read Dick's source novel. This graphic novel had decent art and a sparse narrative style, but ultimately it felt like a tease to me. The 4 collected issues in volume 2 just weren't chunky enough for me. It also doesn't help that I haven't read the first 4 issues, though I can follow the story just fine. Basically, I'd have preferred a volume with more issues, for a more engaging story arc. Still, I would pick up other volumes if I have the time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Read as individual issues from Boom! Studios. I don't really have anything to add over Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep Vol. 1. This is a graphic novel collection of issues 5-8 of the series. The story is a straight, verbatim, adaptation, so it remains true to the original, while adding graphics. The art is great and it remains fully true to the original. I'll probably have more to say by the last book (i.e. Vol. 6).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Neil Coulter

    Most of what I said about the first volume of this series holds true for the second as well. The essays at the end are slightly better than those in the first book. I enjoyed the brief behind-the-scenes glimpse of the creation of three panels on one of the pages, and the two-sided dustjacket is a really nice touch on this book's design. The ribbon marker is also a good extra.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert Hudder

    The artwork in this book marries well with the text. It is a beauty to watch which pieces are being chosen to illustrate as the words go by. The effect isn't so much an Harrison overdub as it is an integrated whole. Watching the next Nexus 6 to be captured and retired. Already Deckard is wondering at his wife's humanity versus the andies he is killing. Strange that he doesn't extend that curiosity to his desire for electric animals...

  15. 4 out of 5

    Wils Cain

    This was our bookclub selection and having already read the story and seen Bladerunner which is based off this story (but not really the same story), I decided to revisit the story through a different artistic interpretation - the graphic novel. It was really beautiful and the artist purposefully did not keep the aesthetic similar to the movie version. 6 volumes to tell the story. Every word from Philip K Dick's book is in the graphic series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Young

    Not quite as good as the first one philosophically. There is more action now that the world has been set up, and the book ends on quite the cliffhanger! Found book 5 fairly boring. Book 6 seemed to be the set-up with some development of Rachel Rosen. Found the interrogation in book 8 to be my favourite part of this collection.

  17. 3 out of 5

    Allison Nyssens

    This was way better than the movie! It is only through the author's descriptions and thought process of the characters that the reader comes to explore the difference between man and machine. It made me uncomfortable enough to be intrigued, but not enough to prevent sleep. Of course I'd recommend this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    poiboy

    Volume 2 is less 'wordy' like a solid novel of thr first volume of theseries. It takes a more standard comic book graphic novel style with dynamic actions scenes and colour. It continues to be a good read and faithful to the original written work by Dick.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John

    Somehow Volume 2 managed to avoid the over reliance on wordy passages that marred Volume 1. As in the source material, readers must wade through extensive set up in Volume 1 but that challenge is rewarded by some stunning action sequences in Volume 2.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carl Nelson

    The story begins to pick up, and the adaptation is living up to its promise of capturing the fullness of Philip K. Dick's dystopia. One of my favorite PKD inventions--"kipple," the clutter that overtakes our lives--is treated as an integral part of the story rather than glossed over.

  21. 4 out of 5

    David

    The dystopian elements of the setting and time are so thick that it is hard to relate to the characters early on. While the artwork is beautiful and immersive, I find myself having a hard time finding an anchor with which to relate to Decker or to any of the characters.

  22. 3 out of 5

    Eric Canlas

    volume two picks up right where volume one left off (really quite an obvious statement...i mean, did i expect it to pick up before volume one...or perhaps after volume three? maybe if they were doing some sort of artsy thing...) can't wait to pick up volume three!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    A faithful adaptation of the story... actually, I believe the story is written word-for-word as PKD had scripted it. add to that some very nice artwork in graphic novel style and you merge two of my favorite things. PKD + G.N.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Deborah Ideiosepius

    See review on #1 of this series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dana Jerman

    the inspiration for "Blade Runner" is fantastic in any medium. Including comix.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tate Ryan

    Was overwhelmed with an urge to revisit and watch Blade Runner while reading this.

  27. 3 out of 5

    Vince

    Enjoying this both as a first exposure to the novel itself as well as graphic interpretation. Four stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yacin

    couldn't put it down, but i preferred the end of baty in blade runner to be honest. that being said, the discussion of what it means to be human was done better in the book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Filipe

    Again, like the previous one, the artwork is great. But I think the direct transcription of the novel text, a lot of it, mind you, might have damaged the graphic novel.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Annabella Ursa

    For me, it's a bit hard to understand, but overall, it was a nice one.

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