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The Westing Game

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A bizarre chain of events begins when sixteen unlikely people gather for the reading of Samuel W. Westing's will. And though no one knows why the eccentric, game-loving millionaire has chosen a virtual stranger - and a possible murderer - to inherit his vast fortune, one thing's for sure: Sam Westing may be dead... but that won't stop him from playing one last game!


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A bizarre chain of events begins when sixteen unlikely people gather for the reading of Samuel W. Westing's will. And though no one knows why the eccentric, game-loving millionaire has chosen a virtual stranger - and a possible murderer - to inherit his vast fortune, one thing's for sure: Sam Westing may be dead... but that won't stop him from playing one last game!

30 review for The Westing Game

  1. 4 out of 5

    karen

    this is what i am going to do: i am going to take a red panda, and i am going to learn genetics and i dunno - neuroscience. and welding. and i am going to take a little bit of my brain, and a little bit of everyone's brain here on goodreads.com (you'll be asleep, you wont feel a thing) and then i am going to moosh it all together, and put it in the brain of the red panda. and then i will have the perfect book-recommending resource. because if i had had one of these when i was little, then it wou this is what i am going to do: i am going to take a red panda, and i am going to learn genetics and i dunno - neuroscience. and welding. and i am going to take a little bit of my brain, and a little bit of everyone's brain here on goodreads.com (you'll be asleep, you wont feel a thing) and then i am going to moosh it all together, and put it in the brain of the red panda. and then i will have the perfect book-recommending resource. because if i had had one of these when i was little, then it would have told me, "you love peggy parrish and her wordplay-based mysteries and you have seen the movie clue enough times that you can recite the whole thing (still can). here's a book you will like". i would have to fine tune it so it works better than the one they have on amazon.com or netflix.com (because, no, i would not like to see the aviator, thank you). i would have loved this book like crazy as a kid. as a grown up, i liked it very much, but thought the characters could have used a little fleshing out to make them more defined. the child-me would not have cared. now i have to go write 250 academic words about it. so much less fun than mad scientisting. come to my blog!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wil Wheaton

    Really fun, and I know without hesitation what third or fourth grade me loved about it. I felt like maybe it dragged a tiny bit in the back half of the second act, but I think that's just me getting ahead of the narrative, and being a little out of the demo. But if you're like 11 to 13? Holy crap, you're gonna love this book, and be on board with it pretty much from the first chapter. It was written in 1978, but it doesn't feel dated (other than the technology), and it ages very well. It has a di Really fun, and I know without hesitation what third or fourth grade me loved about it. I felt like maybe it dragged a tiny bit in the back half of the second act, but I think that's just me getting ahead of the narrative, and being a little out of the demo. But if you're like 11 to 13? Holy crap, you're gonna love this book, and be on board with it pretty much from the first chapter. It was written in 1978, but it doesn't feel dated (other than the technology), and it ages very well. It has a diverse cast, which I didn't appreciate as a kid, because I didn't know any better, but which I deeply appreciate now. Much of it reads as brief vignettes, which made it very easy to pick up and put down. I highly recommend this for young readers, and I highly recommend it a second time to adults who read it when we were kids.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tricia

    This book sounded like it would be lots of fun, and I read it hoping for a great mystery. In the end I think there were too many characters, and not enough information to make any of them seem real to me. I never really got why they were who they were, except on the most basic level. Each character was just glossed over, and even though they were described in a basic way, there was nothing to really draw me in or make me care about them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I think I first read The Westing Game in third or fourth grade. I checked it out of a public school library in Missouri. I loved it, returned it, and checked it again a few months later on another weekly library visit. Two things: 1. Why should children only go to the library once a week? My education would have been brighter and fuller had I just stayed in the library. Other kids could have had more time with the restroom pass, but instead I hoarded that thing and sat on the white raised seat I think I first read The Westing Game in third or fourth grade. I checked it out of a public school library in Missouri. I loved it, returned it, and checked it again a few months later on another weekly library visit. Two things: 1. Why should children only go to the library once a week? My education would have been brighter and fuller had I just stayed in the library. Other kids could have had more time with the restroom pass, but instead I hoarded that thing and sat on the white raised seat reading away. I'm sure my teacher must've been concerned over my restroom needs/habits. 2.I loved Turtle, the girl with the braids that beg to be pulled. I braided my hair like Turtle's and liked whirling around and using them as weapons against boys coming in for the kisschase win. Which was a good development because a couple of years earlier I bit Rashad Ware when he lumbered towards me for a smooch. (I told my parents that I didn't bite him; just was running with my mouth open and happened to want to close it when his arm showed up) Back to the book. Still, years later, in love with Turtle, only the mother in me now has room to love Flora Baumbach, hair braider, as well. And Mrs. stickyfingers Hoo, my new favorite. So, still in love with the book. The whizzbang puzzle mystery abides, only the clues are not as mysterious and I did wish that purple waves meant something really, really sinister and twisted. But that's just my maturity showing. So great to be grown up. This was a sister book club pick. My youngest sister had never read it; apparently, an epic fail in my big sister job on that one. But, it's good to see that I did well enough a job that she knew to find it herself and suggest it for book club. I've helped raise a responsible adult. Even if she liked Crow, the woman in black. My middle sister took a long time, too long of a time, to read this book. But she finished, liked it, and all is well. This would be a great family read aloud book. But, to stop my eldest from reading ahead I would have to hide it really well. Maybe even have clues. And a wax dummy dead body! Long live the Westing Game.

  5. 3 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    A well-written, twisty puzzle of a mystery, filled with fantastic clues, unforgettable characters, and countless red herrings. Turtle Wexler will always be a hero to me.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Isaac Blevins

    I read this little book for the first time not as a child - but as an adult. I was looking for a book to kick off our Junior High book club and picked up the Westing Game to see if it might be a good place to begin. I wish that I had found this book earlier in my life. What kid wouldn't be captivated by wonderful characters thrown together to play a game hosted by a dead millionaire? Don't get me wrong...Mr. Westing isn't a vampire or a zombie - he's just decided that his heirs need to do a lit I read this little book for the first time not as a child - but as an adult. I was looking for a book to kick off our Junior High book club and picked up the Westing Game to see if it might be a good place to begin. I wish that I had found this book earlier in my life. What kid wouldn't be captivated by wonderful characters thrown together to play a game hosted by a dead millionaire? Don't get me wrong...Mr. Westing isn't a vampire or a zombie - he's just decided that his heirs need to do a little puzzle solving in order to earn their share of his estate. While the mystery and the puzzles are fun and wonderfully clever, it's the characters that really make this novel. All of the characters reside and work in the same high rise apartment building within view of the looming Westing estate. Getting snowed in with them is like being trapped with the most interesting people you could imagine - both good and bad. By the end of the novel it's almost like you're part of a family reunion you know these people so well. Do yourself a favor - if you're a kid: pick up this book and have a wonderful time! - if you're an adult: pick up this book and enjoy being a kid again!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    “Life, too, is senseless unless you know who you are, what you want, and which way the wind blows.” What a wild ride this was, and so much fun! I don't know how I would have approached this as a child or young adult, but it made me laugh at so many different stages! My brain is still feeling a little tingly. I never knew what was going to happen next, and I have a feeling that exactly the way Raskin would have wanted it. Can't wait to read more of her books. "She said that she wrote for the child “Life, too, is senseless unless you know who you are, what you want, and which way the wind blows.” What a wild ride this was, and so much fun! I don't know how I would have approached this as a child or young adult, but it made me laugh at so many different stages! My brain is still feeling a little tingly. I never knew what was going to happen next, and I have a feeling that exactly the way Raskin would have wanted it. Can't wait to read more of her books. "She said that she wrote for the child in herself, but for once I think she was wrong. I think she wrote for the adult in children. She never disrespected them or 'wrote down,' because she didn't know how."—Ann Durell, writing about Ellen Raskin

  8. 3 out of 5

    mark monday

    I just want to cut to the chase: the last three chapters, over the course of about nine pages, are some of the most moving I've read in a book written for kids. life, loss, death; growing up and getting old; compassion and empathy; sadness and mourning, sweetness and light. it's all there. such a generosity of spirit from Ellen Raskin. I would have loved to have known her. but I sorta feel I do, from those few pages. the book itself is a delightful lark. a lot of fast-paced fun, but with a surpr I just want to cut to the chase: the last three chapters, over the course of about nine pages, are some of the most moving I've read in a book written for kids. life, loss, death; growing up and getting old; compassion and empathy; sadness and mourning, sweetness and light. it's all there. such a generosity of spirit from Ellen Raskin. I would have loved to have known her. but I sorta feel I do, from those few pages. the book itself is a delightful lark. a lot of fast-paced fun, but with a surprising depth of emotion and a perfect understanding of human nature. I particularly enjoyed the diversity of its cast, the cleverness of its puzzles, the sardonic humor, why the scar happened and what it means, and especially mean little Turtle and her deepening friendship with the woman she decides to call Baba.

  9. 4 out of 5

    seth

    Unless you love driving chainsaws through your innards, please do not read The Westing Game. The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin, is an extremely horrible clue-chasing mystery. The books main events take place in a 5-story apartment called Sunset Towers and the Westing Estate. The book takes place in Michigan around 1975. When reading the Westing Game, it is no more fun than jumping off a cliff for fun. Barney Northrup, a sixty-two year old salesman, is selling apartment spaces in Sunset Towers to Unless you love driving chainsaws through your innards, please do not read The Westing Game. The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin, is an extremely horrible clue-chasing mystery. The books main events take place in a 5-story apartment called Sunset Towers and the Westing Estate. The book takes place in Michigan around 1975. When reading the Westing Game, it is no more fun than jumping off a cliff for fun. Barney Northrup, a sixty-two year old salesman, is selling apartment spaces in Sunset Towers to secretly selected sixteen people. These people all have connections with Samuel W. Westing and are his heirs. Soon after the sixteen settle in to Sunset Towers, Samuel W. Westing is presumed dead. The heirs are all called to the library in the Westing Estate for the reading of the will. Although the sixteen heirs are considered the main characters, the book focuses mainly on the Wexler family. Grace Wexler is married to Jake Wexler, and they have two kids, Angela and Turtle. Grace is house decorator in her mid-forties. Jake is a podiatrist who now works in the lobby of Sunset Towers, since they moved there. Angela is a very calm person who is currently engaged to Denton D. Deere, also a doctor. Overall, the reason I really I really disliked this book was because how boring it was. I was literally sitting there turning a page every five minutes! I would not recommend this to anyone. Over the weeks, the clues still puzzle the heirs, and many events occur including bombs, injuries, parties, and more! Read The Westing Game (don’t) to find out what really happens. If you do choose to read The Westing Game , they have places for people like you.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    As a child, I probably read this book as many times as I watched the movie "Clue" (brilliance), and that is a lot! I loved (and still love) anything with a clever girl as a protagonist. Turtle can stand her ground among Nancy Drew and her ilk. Raskin's cast of characters feels somehow simultaneously real and fantastical, and the mystery is juicy enough to keep you hooked until the final moment of checkmate.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I don't understand why this book won a Newbery Award. It was confusing and sort of awful. Additionally, for today's reader, it felt extremely dated and had some remarks in it that I would call "un-politically correct." It all starts with a group of eccentric people of all ages who quickly become involved in a mystery game involving a large inheritance. The person who first solves the mystery wins the inheritance. Clues are given along the way, but I'm not sure whether or not the reader was suppos I don't understand why this book won a Newbery Award. It was confusing and sort of awful. Additionally, for today's reader, it felt extremely dated and had some remarks in it that I would call "un-politically correct." It all starts with a group of eccentric people of all ages who quickly become involved in a mystery game involving a large inheritance. The person who first solves the mystery wins the inheritance. Clues are given along the way, but I'm not sure whether or not the reader was supposed to be able to solve the mystery. I wouldn't recommend this and I feel bad for kids who have to read it as an assignment.

  12. 4 out of 5

    jessica

    i know this is meant to be a childrens novel, but that thought never crossed my mind whilst reading this. it actually reminded me a lot of the film ‘clue’ - its mysteriously engaging, wildly eccentric, and dangerously witty. a very quick and fun read! 3.5 stars

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mavence

    "Today I have gathered together my nearest and dearest, my sixteen nieces and nephews...I, Samuel W. Westing, hereby swear that I did not die of natural causes. My life was taken by me-by one of you!...Cast out the sinner, let the guilty rise and confess. Who among you is worthy to be the Westing heir?" 16 UNLIKELY HEIRS ON THE HUNT OF A MURDERER AMONG THEM? The Westing Game begins. I never would have thought that this is a children's book. Because honestly, the ingenuity of the plot transcend "Today I have gathered together my nearest and dearest, my sixteen nieces and nephews...I, Samuel W. Westing, hereby swear that I did not die of natural causes. My life was taken by me-by one of you!...Cast out the sinner, let the guilty rise and confess. Who among you is worthy to be the Westing heir?" 16 UNLIKELY HEIRS ON THE HUNT OF A MURDERER AMONG THEM? The Westing Game begins. I never would have thought that this is a children's book. Because honestly, the ingenuity of the plot transcends all age-bracket genres. THIS IS A MASTERPIECE. Sure this isn't really perfect but danggg son, IT'S THE FCKING TWISTS THAT DID ME. At first I just read on without giving any thought about the "murderer" then by the latter part I'm going to piece off one theory, then it get's utterly crushed, and OH! here's another more plausible one, harharrr wrong again! Wait, I'm so sure that it is this one YAAAY, uhmm nope. Then BOOM everything is laid out perfectly right under my nose. What I loved about this book aside from the eye-catching plot, is how these 16 heirs were fleshed out vividly and had developed by the end of the book. I was satisfied that we readers still get to see these 16 heirs grow and age. YES. The conclusion gave us glimpses of their futures in snippets even after The Westing Game had finally resolved. I just love these endings. Overall, this book was filled with humor and witty dialogues. I loved how I pined for the right character! HAAHHA. I recommend this to everyone who wants a fast yet enjoyable mystery book. Definitely one of my fave books this 2018. P.S. I just bought this for 25 pesos in Booksale and I swear, this is the greatest Booksale find I'd ever had in my whole reading career.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Tung

    Yes, this is a children’s book – a Newbery Medal winner from 1978. This was also my absolute favorite book from when I read it as a third grader until I was in middle school and discovered fantasy fiction. I saw it in a used bookstore and decided to press my luck and re-read it, hoping it wouldn’t disappoint me as other childhood favorites had done upon a re-reading (I’m looking at you, Hitchhiker’s Guide…). It didn’t. The Westing Game begins with sixteen seemingly random individuals invited to Yes, this is a children’s book – a Newbery Medal winner from 1978. This was also my absolute favorite book from when I read it as a third grader until I was in middle school and discovered fantasy fiction. I saw it in a used bookstore and decided to press my luck and re-read it, hoping it wouldn’t disappoint me as other childhood favorites had done upon a re-reading (I’m looking at you, Hitchhiker’s Guide…). It didn’t. The Westing Game begins with sixteen seemingly random individuals invited to live in a beautiful building called Sunset Towers. The individuals are then invited to the reading of the will of the wealthy Samuel Westing, recently found dead. But rather than a standard will reading, the sixteen individuals are divided into pairs and given envelopes filled with random words from which they must decipher who the murderer of Samuel Westing is. Winner receives $200 million, and the game is on. The rest of the book details the connection of the individuals to each other, and the revelation of each of the team’s sets of clues. Two decades later in a re-read, and the solution to the mystery is far more obvious than it was to me in the third grade. But the way Raskin unfolds each set of clues, and finds plausible ways to attempt to mislead the reader with the clues, and two decades later, I can better appreciate her wordplay. A definite must-read for elementary school kids, and a recommended read for adults who missed reading this gem when they were in school. Still one of my favorites.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Toph

    One of the best Newbery books I've read. The characters are super distinctive and Raskin is very witty. An example: Turtle forgot the rules of the court and hurried to her mother. "Who did you see, Mom? Who? Who?" (Terrified by the who's, Madame Hoo slipped away.) (view spoiler)[Madame Hoo had stolen the other witnesses's valuables to save money for a return trip to China. (hide spoiler)] 5/5 stars.

  16. 3 out of 5

    Kate Willis

    This should seriously be added to the annals of “The World’s Most Brilliant, Strange Books”. I "solved" the mystery twice and was still wrong both times. :D I even had what I thought was a major spoiler to help me. I was still wrong! But in the end all the twists and turns made perfect sense, and I was left wondering how I hadn’t seen it all before. Also, this book has a grand total of sixteen point of view characters! I would usually call that a bad thing, but this author somehow made me care ( This should seriously be added to the annals of “The World’s Most Brilliant, Strange Books”. I "solved" the mystery twice and was still wrong both times. :D I even had what I thought was a major spoiler to help me. I was still wrong! But in the end all the twists and turns made perfect sense, and I was left wondering how I hadn’t seen it all before. Also, this book has a grand total of sixteen point of view characters! I would usually call that a bad thing, but this author somehow made me care (sometimes even love) each character and recognize them by name. ;) A+ for character development!! I enjoyed the clever clues, the even greater mystery lurking in the shadows, and the quirky cast of characters. Jake Wexler and Theo were my absolute favorites. :D It was really neat to see how, even if there was only one winner to the game, everyone’s lives were brightened and changed by their participation. And I really liked the end. <3 I cried over all the sweetness and (view spoiler)[the emptiness of one character’s life (hide spoiler)] . Just a note that there are some bad attitudes among the children, a bit of slight feminism, and a very theatrically descriptive tall tale about a corpse that is repeated several times during the opening of the book. Best quote: “I remember the will said, 'May God thy gold refine.' That must be from the Bible." "Shakespeare," Turtle said. All quotations were either from the Bible or Shakespeare. Altogether, I very much enjoyed my jaunt into this quirky, brilliant book!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Courtnie

    Fun murder mystery. I suppose that it was written for middle graders, but this adult still enjoyed the whodunnit. Sixteen heirs to a fortune must puzzle out the benefactor's murderer to win the millions. Reminded me of Agatha Christie in a way. Lots of eccentric characters and all of them suspecting of each other. More clever than funny with a strong ending. The ending is what really pushed it past 'just okay' for me. I could see this being brilliant for an early reader and will happily collect a Fun murder mystery. I suppose that it was written for middle graders, but this adult still enjoyed the whodunnit. Sixteen heirs to a fortune must puzzle out the benefactor's murderer to win the millions. Reminded me of Agatha Christie in a way. Lots of eccentric characters and all of them suspecting of each other. More clever than funny with a strong ending. The ending is what really pushed it past 'just okay' for me. I could see this being brilliant for an early reader and will happily collect a copy for my own growing kids.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Grace

    Wow . . . this is . . . brilliant! Such a fun book, and exceptionally written! I think it is meant more for middle grade ages, but all ages will love it! Witty,, mysterious, and yet heartwarming too, this is a book that will quickly become a favorite!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Y. C.

    I first read this in grade eight and thought it was the smartest book ever. It was ingenious and full of twists and plots and I adored the main character Turtle. It's one of those books where everything just connects in the end, all loose strings are tied up, and upon closing the back cover, it leaves the reader with a feeling of satisfaction. It's an amazing book, even after all these years.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Book Review Team

    The Westing Game is about 16 heirs competeing for Sam's Westing's inheritance. This book is a clever mystery full of excitement, danger. and suspicion. There are 8 teams, each team has a set of clues and together they must understand them. Together you must find out who Mrs. Westing is and who killed Sam Westing. You too may strike it rich, who dares to play...The Westing Game. We really loved this book it keeps you on your toes and every little thing matters. If you like a suspenseful, exciting The Westing Game is about 16 heirs competeing for Sam's Westing's inheritance. This book is a clever mystery full of excitement, danger. and suspicion. There are 8 teams, each team has a set of clues and together they must understand them. Together you must find out who Mrs. Westing is and who killed Sam Westing. You too may strike it rich, who dares to play...The Westing Game. We really loved this book it keeps you on your toes and every little thing matters. If you like a suspenseful, exciting book that you can't put down this book is for you. Remember: it's not what you have it's what you don't have that counts.-KMD, CMZ "This is a great book, if you like books that are mysteries that follow one path and that you feel like you are helping solve, this would be a great book for you. It is just like a game as Sam Westing tries to determine his heir, and who is not worthy to be in the game any longer. You start to feel close to all of the characters during some of the best and most suspenseful moments. I highly recomend reading The Westing Game." -MKS I am currently reading The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin. It is about a game. Samuel Westing has invited 16 heirs to play in his game. The game will see who will win his vast fortune. Sam Westing may be dead but that is not stopping him from playing his last game. So far I am really enjoying this book. It is very suspenseful and most things that come up you would not expect at all. Around every corner is another surprise and I cant wait to solve the mystery. -JNM

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charles Finch

    Duh. 100 stars. The best. Read it whenever I remember to.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    I first picked up this book in high school, if I remember correctly, from the high school’s library. I fell in love almost immediately, and when I recently saw a copy at Half-Price Books I picked it up so that I could own it. “The Westing Game” is a wonderful, clever and engaging book. It’s a murder mystery, a puzzle, and a treasure hunt, all in one, centered around the unique cast of characters that inhabit Sunset Towers apartments. The reader essentially becomes a participant in the mystery as I first picked up this book in high school, if I remember correctly, from the high school’s library. I fell in love almost immediately, and when I recently saw a copy at Half-Price Books I picked it up so that I could own it. “The Westing Game” is a wonderful, clever and engaging book. It’s a murder mystery, a puzzle, and a treasure hunt, all in one, centered around the unique cast of characters that inhabit Sunset Towers apartments. The reader essentially becomes a participant in the mystery as we follow each character. There are bombs. There is death. There is a snowstorm. And there is a lot of shin-kicking. One of the things I love about this book is that rereading it always brings up a little gem or tiny detail the brilliant author hid within its pages. Reading it as an adult yielded many insights I never picked up on as a teenager (and would have missed completely as a kid). I love the solution to the puzzle, and I especially love the ending. It does a good job of tying everything together and satisfying a child’s wish to know “what happened next” while still remaining bittersweet and grown-up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    CLAP. CLAP. CLAP. Well done, Ellen Raskin. Quite the clever little yarn you've spun. I can see little middle-school-Lisa reading this book and taking notes and trying to win the prize. Alas, I didn't even know this book existed then. But reading The Undertaker's Gone Bananas gave me the hankering for more mysteries involving kids finding corpses and getting in deep with the grown-up business of murder and finger-pointing. I'll keep it short. After all, it's not what you have, it's what you don't ha CLAP. CLAP. CLAP. Well done, Ellen Raskin. Quite the clever little yarn you've spun. I can see little middle-school-Lisa reading this book and taking notes and trying to win the prize. Alas, I didn't even know this book existed then. But reading The Undertaker's Gone Bananas gave me the hankering for more mysteries involving kids finding corpses and getting in deep with the grown-up business of murder and finger-pointing. I'll keep it short. After all, it's not what you have, it's what you don't have. The Westing Game is a smart, impressive little mystery that will keep you on your toes. I think all my Goodreads gals would appreciate this one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    A clever, engrossing and funny mystery and a good introduction to the genre for young readers.

  25. 3 out of 5

    Trinity Irwin

    I've said it before and I'll say it again, I don't enjoy rereading books, no matter if I thought they were great. But, I could read The Westing Game over and over again, never getting bored. It has such a carefully structured plot and a wonderfully delicious set of characters. I cannot stand when authors can't bounce between different characters with smooth transitions, but Ellen Raskin did it with absolute grace. It's a children's mystery, but a person of any age could enjoy it as much as I did I've said it before and I'll say it again, I don't enjoy rereading books, no matter if I thought they were great. But, I could read The Westing Game over and over again, never getting bored. It has such a carefully structured plot and a wonderfully delicious set of characters. I cannot stand when authors can't bounce between different characters with smooth transitions, but Ellen Raskin did it with absolute grace. It's a children's mystery, but a person of any age could enjoy it as much as I did. There's a new plot twist at every turn that keeps you guessing throughout the entire book, but the biggest one of all is at the very end, and let me tell you, WOW was I not expecting it... And I'm usually pretty good with guessing the culprit if ya know what I mean. With the way the author constructed and presented the book, nothing is predictable, and she for sure keeps you on your toes. My very favorite character through it all was Tabitha, or "Turtle." I cannot stress enough how much you need to read this book. Please do, so you can bask in its written glory with me. ;)

  26. 3 out of 5

    Tamara

    Alright, I finally read it. The copy I read has a copyright date of 1978. So it was kind of interesting to read a book that was born the same year I was! Amazingly, the fact that it was such an old copy was slightly distracting. The changes in stylistic trends is quite obvious. I didn't realize how much of the way I read is based on how things are organized and addressed in type and breaks and alignment. I'm not used to reading mysteries, so for me this was a little hard to follow (quite sad, huh Alright, I finally read it. The copy I read has a copyright date of 1978. So it was kind of interesting to read a book that was born the same year I was! Amazingly, the fact that it was such an old copy was slightly distracting. The changes in stylistic trends is quite obvious. I didn't realize how much of the way I read is based on how things are organized and addressed in type and breaks and alignment. I'm not used to reading mysteries, so for me this was a little hard to follow (quite sad, huh, being a kid's book and all.) I got the gist in the end, and was pleasantly surprised. However, I am always disconcerted when something is left "unresolved" in the end. It makes me crazy! Overall, I'd say this was like the movie "Clue" but without the self-disparagement. I wonder what I would have rated this book if I'd read it as a kid...

  27. 3 out of 5

    Lindsey Lynn

    This is a middle grade/mystery novel about a group of 16 randomly selected people to play a part in a rich man's game. It all starts with a will and millions of dollars at risk. This hodge-podge group of people are summoned to a mansion to take part in a dead man's game. Everyone wants the money but are they cunning enough to see the bigger picture? You get a wide variety of characters and view points throughout this book that come a bit unexpectedly but in a wonderful way. There were characters This is a middle grade/mystery novel about a group of 16 randomly selected people to play a part in a rich man's game. It all starts with a will and millions of dollars at risk. This hodge-podge group of people are summoned to a mansion to take part in a dead man's game. Everyone wants the money but are they cunning enough to see the bigger picture? You get a wide variety of characters and view points throughout this book that come a bit unexpectedly but in a wonderful way. There were characters of every age, though I personally related to Turtle the most. I highly suggest anyone read this wonderful story. It's a great who done it mystery for anyone. This book is timeless both in writing style and characters.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Max

    A re-read. Still as much of a gem as I thought when I was in fourth grade, and there aren't many books I can say that about. The last scenes get me every time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    April

    I don't often read children's books. I don't consider YA to be children's literature. This means I am not as well-read in a certain genre as I would like to be. Now when I say children's lit, I don't mean picture books. I mean the books that are in the juvenile section of the library between the picture books and the young adult books. Of course, when you are not well-read, you can take easy steps to fix the problem like, actually reading the books you haven't read. When I want to correct someth I don't often read children's books. I don't consider YA to be children's literature. This means I am not as well-read in a certain genre as I would like to be. Now when I say children's lit, I don't mean picture books. I mean the books that are in the juvenile section of the library between the picture books and the young adult books. Of course, when you are not well-read, you can take easy steps to fix the problem like, actually reading the books you haven't read. When I want to correct something, I look for what has already been vetted as the best, which means looking up Newbery winners. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin was the 1979 Newbery recipient and had a premise that most definitely appealed to my sensibilities. Read the rest of my review here

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gazella

    I love mystery books and I mostly read Agatha Christie when I'm in the mood for a good murder mystery novel but I'm glad I picked this one up for a change. It's a very entertaining and engrossing read. Full of great humor and wit. The storyline is intriguing and the plot-twists are very well-crafted. It has a variety of quirky and interesting characters and all of them are fully developed. The style of writing is original. At first I found it somewhat confusing because the author switches rapidl I love mystery books and I mostly read Agatha Christie when I'm in the mood for a good murder mystery novel but I'm glad I picked this one up for a change. It's a very entertaining and engrossing read. Full of great humor and wit. The storyline is intriguing and the plot-twists are very well-crafted. It has a variety of quirky and interesting characters and all of them are fully developed. The style of writing is original. At first I found it somewhat confusing because the author switches rapidly between several different characters' viewpoints but I quickly became used to it after a couple of chapters. The ending was not disappointing, it was wonderful, totally satisfying.

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