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I draghi del crepuscolo d'autunno

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Dopo il ritorno dei draghi di Takhisis, gli abitanti del mondo di Krynn disperano di poter trovare la pace, ma anche nell'oscurità delle tenebre brilla l'esile bagliore della fiamma della speranza. Un pugno di eroi stringe un'alleanza per sconfiggere i draghi malvagi: la Regina delle Tenebre, cavalieri, barbari, gnomi, elfi intraprendono dunque la perigliosa ricerca della Dopo il ritorno dei draghi di Takhisis, gli abitanti del mondo di Krynn disperano di poter trovare la pace, ma anche nell'oscurità delle tenebre brilla l'esile bagliore della fiamma della speranza. Un pugno di eroi stringe un'alleanza per sconfiggere i draghi malvagi: la Regina delle Tenebre, cavalieri, barbari, gnomi, elfi intraprendono dunque la perigliosa ricerca della leggendaria Dragonlance. Riusciranno nell'impresa?


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Dopo il ritorno dei draghi di Takhisis, gli abitanti del mondo di Krynn disperano di poter trovare la pace, ma anche nell'oscurità delle tenebre brilla l'esile bagliore della fiamma della speranza. Un pugno di eroi stringe un'alleanza per sconfiggere i draghi malvagi: la Regina delle Tenebre, cavalieri, barbari, gnomi, elfi intraprendono dunque la perigliosa ricerca della Dopo il ritorno dei draghi di Takhisis, gli abitanti del mondo di Krynn disperano di poter trovare la pace, ma anche nell'oscurità delle tenebre brilla l'esile bagliore della fiamma della speranza. Un pugno di eroi stringe un'alleanza per sconfiggere i draghi malvagi: la Regina delle Tenebre, cavalieri, barbari, gnomi, elfi intraprendono dunque la perigliosa ricerca della leggendaria Dragonlance. Riusciranno nell'impresa?

30 review for I draghi del crepuscolo d'autunno

  1. 3 out of 5

    Kevin

    Dragonlance was the first fantasy novel series I ever read so it holds a special place in my heart. The Chronicles Trilogy was the first in a series of 10 core books. There are probably well over a 100 books set in the Dragonlance world but these are the ones you need to read. Chroncicles Trilogy: Dragons of Autumn Twilight Dragons of Winter Night Dragons of Spring Dawning Legends Trilogy: Time of the Twins War of the Twins Test of the Twins Transitions to next generation: Dragons of Summer Flame The War o Dragonlance was the first fantasy novel series I ever read so it holds a special place in my heart. The Chronicles Trilogy was the first in a series of 10 core books. There are probably well over a 100 books set in the Dragonlance world but these are the ones you need to read. Chroncicles Trilogy: Dragons of Autumn Twilight Dragons of Winter Night Dragons of Spring Dawning Legends Trilogy: Time of the Twins War of the Twins Test of the Twins Transitions to next generation: Dragons of Summer Flame The War of Souls: Dragons of a Fallen Sun Dragons of a Lost Star Dragons of a Vanished Moon I especially recommend the Legends trilogy, they are the only books I know to mix time travel and fantasy. Also, they are about Rastlin and Caramon, by far the most compelling characters.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Markus

    Hear the sage as his song descends like heaven's rain or tears, and washes the years, the dust of the many stories from the High Tale of the Dragonlance. Three centuries have passed since the Cataclysm, where burning mountains fell from the sky and the gods of old abandoned their mortal worshippers. When a group of adventurers come together at the Inn of the Last Home after five long years on their own, they endeavour to begin a search for what has been lost. But darkness awaits them on their journ Hear the sage as his song descends like heaven's rain or tears, and washes the years, the dust of the many stories from the High Tale of the Dragonlance. Three centuries have passed since the Cataclysm, where burning mountains fell from the sky and the gods of old abandoned their mortal worshippers. When a group of adventurers come together at the Inn of the Last Home after five long years on their own, they endeavour to begin a search for what has been lost. But darkness awaits them on their journey, and like lightning from a cloudless sky, the horrors of war return to the magical world of Krynn. It's a wonderful feeling when you're able to get immersed in a fantasy story and after a while realise that you started reading the exact right book at the exact right time. Dragons of Autumn Twilight was such a book for me. After reading several huge bricks containing complex tales, all the while also reading tons of historical texts, I needed something light and easy. I picked this book, after having considered it for more than a year, and I couldn't have been happier with that choice. The Dragonlance series is one of the pillars of modern fantasy, and even though it contains any number of overused tropes, it also produces new ones; tropes that have been used by numerous newer fantasy series since the publication of this book back in 1984. There are, of course, quite a few downsides to the book. Most of them are in some way connected to the fact that it is really simple. The story is very straightforward, the world is not as developed as most other fantasy worlds, and the writing is not impressive in any way. This could in many ways be considered a YA fantasy, but even so, it was a whole lot better than every single YA book I've ever read before. I also should mention that I found the book to be a lot funnier than even what seemed to be the authors' intention. Some characters, like Fizban the senile mage, were obviously just introduced as comic relief (and it worked perfectly), whereas others had hilarious sides to them, like the dwarf Flint Fireforge and his extreme aquaphobia. Perhaps it went a bit too far with the immeasureable stupidity of gully dwarves and the evil goblins' utter uselessness in combat, but hey, it made me smile, so I'm not complaining! One aspect of the book I enjoyed quite a bit more than I had expected, was characterisation. According to most of the reviews I read before starting this, the characters were generic, shallow and one-dimensional. I could agree with the first of those to some extent, but certainly not with the latter two. Some of these characters, like Tanis Half-Elven and Raistlin Majere, were really interesting (though not on the level of my favourite Fizban). They were not among the best fantasy characters I've ever encountered, but I liked them, and that's all that matters. The only complaint I can come up with is that the book is too short for the reader to really get to know them, but with so many other books to read from this world, I suspect that won't be a problem for very long. This was not a brilliant book and it had lots of flaws. But what matters to me is that I really enjoyed reading it. To be honest, this rating would be way too high if I was considering the objective quality of the book. But who cares about objectivity?

  3. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    Someone played a dungeons and dragons game (which is based heavily on Tolkien's books) and then decided to write down what their characters did and publish it. And while dungeons and dragons is great fun for those playing it, everyone has had to suffer through players who labor under the mistaken impression that their adventures are just as interesting to everyone else as they are to the player... "So then, like, you know, this Orc came out of the weapons room but I rolled a 20 and I threw my +5 Someone played a dungeons and dragons game (which is based heavily on Tolkien's books) and then decided to write down what their characters did and publish it. And while dungeons and dragons is great fun for those playing it, everyone has had to suffer through players who labor under the mistaken impression that their adventures are just as interesting to everyone else as they are to the player... "So then, like, you know, this Orc came out of the weapons room but I rolled a 20 and I threw my +5 sword and it went right through his shield and practically killed him. And so then, like, Arabella threw a level 23 fireball spell at him while Tantros cast an ice spell at the Orc's feet, and so he was, you know, frozen to the floor, like, when the fireball hit him...."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Wow (not a good wow). I just read some of these reviews and ratings. I have to raise my hand and be the voice of reason. The public deserves this. Let's get something straight here: these books are unreadable for anyone older than 15. I love fantasy and I don't have an issue with the world building or the story here. In my reviews, I sometimes excuse poor writing, characterization and other literary elements when the author does other things extremely well. Most novels have multiple flaws and the Wow (not a good wow). I just read some of these reviews and ratings. I have to raise my hand and be the voice of reason. The public deserves this. Let's get something straight here: these books are unreadable for anyone older than 15. I love fantasy and I don't have an issue with the world building or the story here. In my reviews, I sometimes excuse poor writing, characterization and other literary elements when the author does other things extremely well. Most novels have multiple flaws and their relative importance to each reader will dictate how much enjoyment is sucked out of the read. I could not excuse the literary flaws in this book. They were repetitive, sharp and massive. The characters are as flat as pancakes. At least pancakes have two sides. These guys are so utterly simple. I realize that this book was a relative trailblazer in the early 1980s, so it's hard to say that they are stereotypes. But they are stereotypes. The first 200 pages basically consists of gathering members of the Quest. They are picked up like gum stuck to your shoe; there's no subtlety. As every typical fantasy element was gathered for the Quest, I wondered how this was different than LOTR, other than being crappy. I thought it would be interesting to read the annotated version of this book so I could see what the authors were thinking. Normally this gives you insight into their thought process, how this plot line impacts the overall story or some background information for characters that might be interesting. Somehow the notations made it worse. My eyes almost rolled straight out of my skull several times as the authors' simple thought process was revealed to me like the opening of a pack of Kraft cheese singles. The writing is simplistic to the Nth degree. I've never encountered so many adverbs in a single tome. I only got to page 350 or so, with my effort set to maximum. Perhaps pages 351 and beyond are genius but I'll never know. I'll live. (As a gigantor caveat, I'll add that I would not discourage kids from reading this - it would be accessible and fun for them.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mayim de Vries

    Disclaimer: My rating is purely sentimental. Dragons of Autumn Twilight is a read down the memory lane. If I were to rate it on the basis of my current standards and preferences, it would score 3 stars the most. As it is, it has been one of the earliest fantasy books I have ever read and it still engulfs me in the fuzzy warmth of initial wonder that there are other fantasy books beside the Lord of the Rings and that I can read them and love them as much as I like. It’s also one of the three book Disclaimer: My rating is purely sentimental. Dragons of Autumn Twilight is a read down the memory lane. If I were to rate it on the basis of my current standards and preferences, it would score 3 stars the most. As it is, it has been one of the earliest fantasy books I have ever read and it still engulfs me in the fuzzy warmth of initial wonder that there are other fantasy books beside the Lord of the Rings and that I can read them and love them as much as I like. It’s also one of the three books sporting dragons that I truly like, which I consider a feat in itself. This book has one saving grace that simultaneously constitutes its greatest pitfall: it’s as classic as classics go. You will find here every existing trope and the novel doesn’t even pretend to deviate off the beaten tracks of the usual fantasy figures and cliches. In 1984 that was quite alright, over 30 years later, while the book passes the test of time, it loses some of its shine and allure. If you are a young reader and relatively new to fantasy, there is a huge chance you will like it, otherwise, it can drive you crazy with predictability and a narrative bordering on a draft movie script. Amid the rising tide of evil, dragons return to the world of Krynn led by the powerful Queen of Darkness, Takhisis. The humankind is lost, the gods of light have apparently abandoned men, the wisdom of the old ages is lost and there are no heroes to lead them into the battle. Luckily, in the Inn of the Last Home, a group of people is forced to form a party of unwilling and mistrustful allies forced by the circumstances. Their first quest is to save a powerful artifact from the power of darkness: goblins, draconians and other sycophants of the Lord Verminaard, one of the generals of the evil Queen. Anybody who ever played the Baldur’s Gate will immediately recognise the standard composition of an adventuring party. You will have Tanis, the half-elf, torn between the two races of his heritage, Flint, the dwarf, Raistlin the frail mage and his twin-brother Caramon, your typical hack-and-slash warrior, the heroic paladin Sturm, Goldmoon and Riverwind, two barbarians, Tika, a buxom tavern girl and Laurana, a beautiful elven maiden. The most innovative the book has to offer are two characters: Fizban, the wizard and Tasslehoff Bourrfoot, the kender. The first one, while being a derivative of your generic Gandalf-like all-wise and mighty figure, has its own quirks that make him quite unique. Fizban disguises himself as a senile and not quite up-to-date with reality. Plainly speaking, quite crazy. Nobody knows how powerful he is, nobody suspects how vital a character for the forces of Light and nobody takes him seriously. His frequent discussions with trees and heated debates with other inanimate objects might have something to do with it. Tasllehoff, on the other hand, is your generic derivative of a hobbit. Kenders are, small and annoying like children. This race knows no fear and their definition of property is a little bit skewed. Tas is the main source of humour and comic relief in the book (even though his reflections on how small things make the difference is one of the wisest passages in the book). The story is undoubtedly character driven. Indeed, forming the adventuring party takes most of the time and individual members need to reconcile with each other or find their way and place in the group. As the plot unfolds, the companions discover their true goals in the coming war and need to come to terms with their personal burdens, backstories, and destinies. Mind you, the story is naive (I have read more mature YA by contemporary authors) and presents an idealised vision of the world, but is fast paced and still able to grasp reader’s attention. You might give it a try. Also in the series: 2. Dragons of Winter Night 3. Dragons of Spring Dawning

  6. 4 out of 5

    Graeme

    I first read this book about the time it came out, when I was about 10 or 11... and recently found an identical, battered paperback copy at a thrift store. Dipping back into it twenty-odd years later, it has many shortcomings. However, it still takes me back to that time when I'd read under the covers at night with a dying flashlight, and fell asleep dreaming of wizards, warriors and strange, forgotten lands.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Curtis Westman

    When I was nine years old, I wrote a short story about an elf and a mage traversing an imaginary world and banishing evil back to the depths from whence it came. I was proud of the story. I showed it to my family and they read it, and pretended it was great. They put it on the fridge. I reread the story years later and it was a difficult decision whether I should laugh or whether the embarrassment was too much even for hysterics. I thought fantasy fiction had a formula that alternated between a s When I was nine years old, I wrote a short story about an elf and a mage traversing an imaginary world and banishing evil back to the depths from whence it came. I was proud of the story. I showed it to my family and they read it, and pretended it was great. They put it on the fridge. I reread the story years later and it was a difficult decision whether I should laugh or whether the embarrassment was too much even for hysterics. I thought fantasy fiction had a formula that alternated between a short climax and a short resolution like the regular, predictable oscillations of a wave pattern. Like that wave pattern, it seemed to go on and on so that a 20-paged story seemed to take forever to read. At nine years old, I thought this was an exciting, scintillating narrative. I thought it should be published. But it shouldn't have, I know that now. It's a shame that the whole thing may as well have been plagiarized from this novel. They share the same structure, the same generic character models and the same laughably simplistic moralities that I could have been summarizing a 400-paged novel. And yet, my version didn't take five hours of your life. My version didn't make you sigh and look wistfully out the window as if to say, "since reading this book, time has passed inexorably onward, I have aged terribly, and yet I have learned nothing." The clouds float by and the traffic continues on the street, but a part of you has died. Unlike the novel, however, when pieces of your soul die, they stay dead. The same cannot be said for the major characters in Dragons of Autumn Twilight. The plot reads as if played through a Dungeons and Dragons campaign. Not simply in the sense that it's disorganized and illogical, but also because the reader actually gets the sense that someone is rolling dice to determine the outcome. At various parts of the book that are meant to be exciting, the narrative devolves into explanations of the mechanics of the game. Raistlin is a mage, and thus must memorize his spells every morning if he is to use them throughout the day. Everyone is suddenly struck by fear and must roll 1d20 for a fear check (except the Kender, because he's immune). Tanis, as an elf, is able to see the aura of all living things, except past chapter 5 because it's too hard to keep talking about that ability for too long. It's an ordeal to read. But I loved it when I was nine. I also had no idea what true hardship was. I do now. It gives me a basis of comparison. There are many hardships I'd rather face than reading this novel again.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Loved it 🖤🐾🐺

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    My daughter is getting older now and asking me for suggestions on books that are "age appropriate" - her term. I purposely haven't read all of the Harry Potter books (nor seen the movies) because I was hoping to read/watch all of them with her. She's 10 and hasn't shown the slightest interest in those books, but she just became interested in Star Wars this summer, so I'm willing to give her time. I use this anecdote and the "age appropriate" tag because as a young lad in love with reading this s My daughter is getting older now and asking me for suggestions on books that are "age appropriate" - her term. I purposely haven't read all of the Harry Potter books (nor seen the movies) because I was hoping to read/watch all of them with her. She's 10 and hasn't shown the slightest interest in those books, but she just became interested in Star Wars this summer, so I'm willing to give her time. I use this anecdote and the "age appropriate" tag because as a young lad in love with reading this series came along at the right time to fill a need. I really liked these pulpy, page-turning fantasy send-ups lacking the creative stones of Tolkien. I was a 16-18 year old boy; Camus would have been lost on me - and if he wasn't, I would have been carving Morrissey lyrics onto my forearm unironically. I don't know whether I'd recommend these to my 15 year-old daughter in 5 years time, but if she is into light fantasy I'll do it without hesitation. Would I ever read these again? Not while there is still Camus volumes I've yet to read and The Smiths B-sides to discover.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Great start to an all-time classic fantasy series! I loved the colorful characters and fast-moving plot based on an interesting story line of reunited friends with secrets and a mysterious (and gorgeous, of course) stranger who drew them into danger and excitement.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Efrona Mor

    I absolutely enjoyed this book. I call it an oldie as it’s not from this decade, but for me that means a clean read, less gory and more story….. In the land of Krynn’s somewhat easygoing world of laborers, the likes of magic wafts around like superstition. But when an evil force stirs things up from the north a group of old friends reunite to face a long journey together. In this character driven story, as most epic fantasy novels hold dear to, I loved being transported into this series of detai I absolutely enjoyed this book. I call it an oldie as it’s not from this decade, but for me that means a clean read, less gory and more story….. In the land of Krynn’s somewhat easygoing world of laborers, the likes of magic wafts around like superstition. But when an evil force stirs things up from the north a group of old friends reunite to face a long journey together. In this character driven story, as most epic fantasy novels hold dear to, I loved being transported into this series of detail around each of their lives, and as well cheer the solid writing that Weis and Hickman produce together. I was especially intrigued to find they were a writing team of both male and female influence. I found it a brilliant balance that some books do not manage well. I’m not a romance enthusiast devouring books of the romantic genre, but I do look forward to the romance that usually tips of a good epic fantasy novel, it doesn’t eat the book alive, it’s just there in the mix. They did it well.. The magic is quite complicated and somewhat fallible making it more interesting, rather than power errrupting out of nowhere.. Anyone who loves a good epic fantasy should enjoy this book.. Cheers

  12. 4 out of 5

    A. Dawes

    When I read this D&D was all the rage, and this series gave lovers of high fantasy exactly what they were craving. I thought it very good at the time, not nearly as good as Brooks or Donaldson and naturally not Tolkien, but still an entertaining adventure trilogy. I think Weis & Hickman's Rose of the Prophet series along with their Darksword books are also better due to their originality. In this opening novel of the trilogy, friends of different ages and races are reunited after a lengt When I read this D&D was all the rage, and this series gave lovers of high fantasy exactly what they were craving. I thought it very good at the time, not nearly as good as Brooks or Donaldson and naturally not Tolkien, but still an entertaining adventure trilogy. I think Weis & Hickman's Rose of the Prophet series along with their Darksword books are also better due to their originality. In this opening novel of the trilogy, friends of different ages and races are reunited after a lengthy absence. They all have their own unspoken mysteries, and the world around them is also darkening. There is talk of monsters and evil beings in far off lands, and even the threat of war. Yet these friends are courageous and powerful, and may be all that can save the world from the pervading darkness. Look, it's probably dated heaps, but if you're after a good old fantasy adventure with plenty of escapism, then give this a go.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.0 stars. I did not go into this book with very high expectations thinking is was going to be a little cheesy. Wrong again. I really enjoyed this and thought it was a ton of fun. Great world-building, excellent characters and a fast-paced, non-stop plot. Call it fantasy comfort food, but call it very good.

  14. 5 out of 5

    MissBecka

    I adore this series and can't wait to get into the next book! We are adding in The Lost Chronicles during this re-read with my husband. Next up Dragons of the Dwarven Depths Favourite characters: Raistlin Majere and Tasslehoff Burrfoot

  15. 4 out of 5

    ijeoma Agbaje

    1.5 stars I honestly believe that if i had read this book when i was way younger, i would have absolutely loved it. Now though, it's kinda hard to overlook the toxic fragile masculinity, the idiocy, pointless pride and female idiot quota that makes up the companions who are to save the world. Quite frankly the only person who had a lick of sense in this book was Raistlin. Riverwind aka Masculinity so fragile: How on earth did such a toxic character get written? This guy was supposed to be Goldmoo 1.5 stars I honestly believe that if i had read this book when i was way younger, i would have absolutely loved it. Now though, it's kinda hard to overlook the toxic fragile masculinity, the idiocy, pointless pride and female idiot quota that makes up the companions who are to save the world. Quite frankly the only person who had a lick of sense in this book was Raistlin. Riverwind aka Masculinity so fragile: How on earth did such a toxic character get written? This guy was supposed to be Goldmoon's le boo but apparently he couldn't handle her being his leader. How the heck do you fall in love with someone you clearly know will lead your people, essentially be your boss and start forming omg i fell in love with Goldmoon and not the chieftan's daughter? is this not madness??? ...still you are now their ruler- bitterness had crept into his voice - and i will be husband of Chieftain Goldmoon does the classic spineless female and tries to comfort him dude goes "I was thinking about it last night. I've been gone so many years. My thoughts were of you as a woman. I did not realize- he swalloed and then drew a deep breath. I left Goldmoon. I returned to find Chieftain's Daughter" Goldmoon tries to reason with him, telling him she had no choice as her father had fallen ill and couldn't lead and if she hadn't stepped up to the plate so to speak someone else would have taken over. Know what masculinity so fragile did after this impassioned plea? "Riverwind listened his face stern and unmoving. He stared at a point above her head. We should get started he said coldly. It's nearly dawn". Dude kept disrespecting her at every turn until she finally asks for forgiveness for being Chieftain's daughter. "Oh my beloved. I am sorrier than i can say that you came home to chieftain's daughter and not Goldmoon" TF?????!!!!!!! He also apologises but excuses his behaviour on the fact that she didn't tell him all that she had been through.. I'm just here like TF?? At which point she agrees to rescind her title as Chieftain's daughter when their journey comes to an end. Of course he doesn't argue. At every point when Goldmoon had an opinion that didn't go with his, this.. this... little turd would shoot her down in the rudest way. like WTF???!!! I really do not understand how this utterly, despicable chauvanist got hailed as one of the heroes. Tanis: This was supposedly the leader of the group. I guess they chose him because he was a sturdy fellow but hot damn if there ever was a bland character this would be it. He was just bleh. Take a fucking decision be bloody decisive for crying out loud but nope. Dude couldn't even make up his mind about his love life Ugh!!! I don't know about you guys but when shit happens and the author keeps telling you, your heroes is scared and hands are shaking and they're ready to piss their pants (okay probably overboard there) but yeah, you start looking at them like okayyyyyyyyyyyyyy, can i get another hero please? Sturm: Another despicable human being who couldn't think for himself. Absolutely did not like this character simply because he was close minded little shit!! I absolutely could not understand why he hated Raistlin (maybe there's history there) and why at every turn he kept shouting that Raistlin had betrayed them.. Dude was dim honestly. Let's not forget the other times he would have gladly put the others in death's way just because his bloody knight oath or some shit like that said don't retreat.. Dude if you want to commit suicide, please go ahead, but don't drag the others into it. Tasslehoff Burrfoot: Fucking idiot character. Flint: Now that i think about it. Flint was just there can't say his character got fleshed out so much. Reminded me of the dwarf character in Lord of the Rings though. So maybe you can substitute the two. Apparently dwarves have the same personality across books. Goldmoon, Laurana and Tika: These were basically the 3 main female characters in the novel, with Laurana and Tika joining the group much later in the adventure. Goldmoon we already know, Tika is presented as a strong opinionated female character so i guess there's hope for her. Laurana is presented as the female who wants to prove to the guy she loves that she's all grown up and can fight. Miss me with that bull shit. but there you have it, the glorious female characters of Dragons of Autumn twilight. All in all it wasn't a very enjoyable book. I did not like the female characters were presented and there were instances were the continuation of scenes were off. That aside if you can stand the narration coming off like you're watching a kid's programme, chauvinistic characters, dim witted knights, bleh leaders you may enjoy the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Autumn, 1984, my junior year in high school. I finished collecting for my paper route, then walked down to Main Street to the Hobby Shop (the only source at that point for D&D materials in my hometown). There on the rack, in front of a bunch of random adventure modules, was a red paperback book with a lovely Larry Elmore cover (not that I knew who he was by name, but I'm sure I recognized his art style from previous issues of Dragon magazine, or work in other D&D supplements and the like Autumn, 1984, my junior year in high school. I finished collecting for my paper route, then walked down to Main Street to the Hobby Shop (the only source at that point for D&D materials in my hometown). There on the rack, in front of a bunch of random adventure modules, was a red paperback book with a lovely Larry Elmore cover (not that I knew who he was by name, but I'm sure I recognized his art style from previous issues of Dragon magazine, or work in other D&D supplements and the like) called Dragons of Autumn Twilight. It was, as far as I'm aware, the first RPG tie-in novel. (Unless you want to count Quag Keep by Andre Norton, which was a very odd duck, or maybe The Man of Gold by M.A.R. Barker, but Barker had been building his world and writing fiction before he got pulled into the original D&D guys' crowd. But I digress.) I probably knew that it was coming out sooner or later -- I'm sure it had been advertised in the aforementioned Dragon magazine -- but in those dim and distant days there was no such thing as a "release date" -- you just showed up at the store periodically to see if anything new was on the shelf. So I took it home, vanished downstairs into my room and for some number of hours spread across the next several days I was transported to the Inn of the Last Home, the ruins of Xak Tsaroth, the great fortress of Pax Tharkas ... All of which is a very long way of saying that even though I could see flaws back in the day (the prose was serviceable at best; some of the dungeon crawl sequences felt a little too close to a tabletop session; Kender and gully dwarves are just irritating), on this, my first return to the Dragonlance books in probably 25 years, there's no way in heck I'm going to be objective about them.

  17. 3 out of 5

    Allison ☾

    Why us? Tanis thought bitterly. Was there ever a more unlikely group of heroes- bickering, grumbling, arguing- half of us not trusting the other half. “We were chosen.” This book truly does read like playing an RPG, the entire plot of the book was: “We have to go here for answers.” *encounters enemies* “Now we have to deliver this item here.” *encounters enemies* “Now we have to go here.” *boss fight* It took me a while to get into this, and I think the reason for that is because we are introduced to Why us? Tanis thought bitterly. Was there ever a more unlikely group of heroes- bickering, grumbling, arguing- half of us not trusting the other half. “We were chosen.” This book truly does read like playing an RPG, the entire plot of the book was: “We have to go here for answers.” *encounters enemies* “Now we have to deliver this item here.” *encounters enemies* “Now we have to go here.” *boss fight* It took me a while to get into this, and I think the reason for that is because we are introduced to a full cast of characters immediately and all of them are stereotypes of their race and fighting class. For example, the stubborn dwarf with a battle-axe, the knight paladin, the fair-haired female healer, the mischievous thief Kender. I mean it goes on and on. Evil creatures are ugly, black and red. Elves are beautiful and graceful. We aren’t given any character development until later on in the book. When the relationships, secret struggles and inner monologue of the characters began, that was when I became emotionally invested. So that being said, I did enjoy the story. If I had never picked up a single fantasy novel in my life this would be an excellent start. Some of my favorite parts: - Tas and Flint acting like 2 drunk girls leaving the party to have their own adventure. - Tas impersonating the dragon. - Tas and Fizban’s shenanigans. - Raistlin and Bupu. - Tika being relatable. - The Unicorn. What I didn’t like: - So much of the story was reliant on pure luck. I expect this with the mages and the Kender but for the humans and dwarves it felt like lazy writing. - The love triangle between Tanis and the human woman and the elf woman kind of reminded me of Aragorn from LOTR. - There was a traitor *gasp* oh but it’s a new character so nobody cares if he dies. Anyways, I own this trilogy so I will be finishing these books at some point!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sad Sunday (If I say it's bad, it's bad)

    DNF at 41%. It's becoming a habit. I just love the beginning, but everything just goes down from there. I would probably have loved it as a child. Plot is action packed, tons of things happen just one after another. But the constant jumping from one character to another is annoying - almost half into the book I still feel like I don't really know any of them. Their backstories are incomplete, when it comes to something more descriptive, everything is cut down to another action scene. The scenery c DNF at 41%. It's becoming a habit. I just love the beginning, but everything just goes down from there. I would probably have loved it as a child. Plot is action packed, tons of things happen just one after another. But the constant jumping from one character to another is annoying - almost half into the book I still feel like I don't really know any of them. Their backstories are incomplete, when it comes to something more descriptive, everything is cut down to another action scene. The scenery changes too fast in my opinion - they cross marshes in a few sentences, forests and lakes are passed in a wink. And some of the character are quite stupid (Goldmoon is the one who would always loudly fart, sneeze and hick-up if you were hiding in the bushes from scary goblins - thanks, Goldmoon *eye-roll*). Sometimes their decisions are weird to infinity and beyond. The scene where (view spoiler)[Goldmoon saves her BAE (who, in a normal world would be dead already because his body is literally in scraps) with a magic staff and just winks and says: "Ok, he is alive, lets go to fight dragon!" is just not OK with me, I already seen some of The Walking Dead. (hide spoiler)] There is no logic in it, no sense of wonder, nothing fully magical or mysterious. Like something everyday, so mundane. Yuck. All that said, it't not a bad book. You might like it even if I didn't. I allow you to like it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    Definitely enjoyable! I liked the characters and have some major questions about what had happened to them before the beginning of this book. I thought at times, it could be convenient and it seemed like one small problem after another over and over, but I did enjoy the story and the world. I'll definitely continue on and see what is going to happen next.

  20. 3 out of 5

    Christina

    It has been nearly 25 years since I read this book and I have to say I enjoyed it just as much this time as I did the first time. I was a little hesitant to reread because I have gone back to some books I read as a teen and found that I didn't enjoy the nearly as much as I did the first time around. I am really glad that did not hold true for this book. It was like revisiting an old friend I hadn't seen in a very long time. I found that I remembered the characters decently well, however, I found It has been nearly 25 years since I read this book and I have to say I enjoyed it just as much this time as I did the first time. I was a little hesitant to reread because I have gone back to some books I read as a teen and found that I didn't enjoy the nearly as much as I did the first time around. I am really glad that did not hold true for this book. It was like revisiting an old friend I hadn't seen in a very long time. I found that I remembered the characters decently well, however, I found that I didn't remember how the story played out all that much, so even though it was a reread for me in some sense it felt as if I was picking the book up for the first time and I can't wait to reread the other three this year! Also, because the way the book is written reminds me of a D&D campaign, it took me back to my teen years and the enjoyment I used to get when playing D&D. It almost makes me want to go back to playing D&D, although finding the time for that now is far harder than it used to be.

  21. 3 out of 5

    Kitvaria Sarene

    This a book I have to judge by two standards. Just like any (new) fantasy book: It is a bit predictable, the characters are easy to understand, and very black and white. Even the one character that is supposed to be grey, and unpredictable for the reader is quite obviously not a bad guy. I felt to safe in the story, and as it is a clear quest - even if you missed a minute or two of the audio book, you still had no problem to follow the story. => 3 stars As a book that was published in 1984: A gem This a book I have to judge by two standards. Just like any (new) fantasy book: It is a bit predictable, the characters are easy to understand, and very black and white. Even the one character that is supposed to be grey, and unpredictable for the reader is quite obviously not a bad guy. I felt to safe in the story, and as it is a clear quest - even if you missed a minute or two of the audio book, you still had no problem to follow the story. => 3 stars As a book that was published in 1984: A gem! This is a real classic. No big love triangles, no detailed sex scenes or gore, an interesting quest to follow, a whole new level of fantasy! Those cliches you find in this book haven't been used over and over back then - but a lot of the newer books borrowed from dragonlance. If you like to see where the genre comes from - this is must read! => 5 stars With those different judgements in my mind I give it four stars, and a hearty recommendation!

  22. 3 out of 5

    Olethros

    -En su propuesta, que engloba muchas cosas, un hito.- Género. Narrativa Fantástica. Lo que nos cuenta. Un grupo de aventureros de diferentes razas y orígenes une sus fuerzas contra el mal… sí, bueno, podría ser más preciso en cuanto a las razones, los motivos, pero en realidad para qué… Primer libro de la saga Dragonlance y primer libro de la trilogía Crónicas de la Dragonlance. ¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite: http://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com/...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris Van Dyke

    Every so often I do this to myself. I pick up an old, "classic" High Fantasy novel because I think it "will be fun" and a throwback to being in middle-school, and then about 100 pages in I can't do it any more. The prose is wooden, the characters cringe-worthy cliches . . . and I still have 800 pages to go. Dear god, when there are so many good books out there, how can I possibly slavishly force my through one of these? These books also remind me that I shouldn't be such a snob by only having a Every so often I do this to myself. I pick up an old, "classic" High Fantasy novel because I think it "will be fun" and a throwback to being in middle-school, and then about 100 pages in I can't do it any more. The prose is wooden, the characters cringe-worthy cliches . . . and I still have 800 pages to go. Dear god, when there are so many good books out there, how can I possibly slavishly force my through one of these? These books also remind me that I shouldn't be such a snob by only having a "weird-fiction" shelf, because this clearly belongs on a "Fantasy" shelf.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Lowed

    Five years has passed. Five long years since they have seen each other. They have decided to split up before to search for their truth. The story behind the Cataclysm. The story behind why the Gods abandoned the land, leaving men in utter confusion and cloaked in darkness. Tanis Half-Elven (leader of the companions), Sturm Brightblade(an honorable knight), Caramon Majere, (twin brother- the mage) Raistlin Majere, Flint Fireforge, and Tasslehoff Burrfoot (my favorite character) were among the maj Five years has passed. Five long years since they have seen each other. They have decided to split up before to search for their truth. The story behind the Cataclysm. The story behind why the Gods abandoned the land, leaving men in utter confusion and cloaked in darkness. Tanis Half-Elven (leader of the companions), Sturm Brightblade(an honorable knight), Caramon Majere, (twin brother- the mage) Raistlin Majere, Flint Fireforge, and Tasslehoff Burrfoot (my favorite character) were among the major characters. Their meeting place was the Inn of the Last Home. And there they met Goldmoon (the bearer of the blue staff) and Riverwind (the tribe-outcast slash lover slash bodyguard of Goldmoon). I know, am not really good at making reviews. But it was really a fantastic read, I tell you. Fast paced, funny (thanks to Tas and Fizben). It reminded me of The Name of the Wind (though TNotW is grittier), but the reading does have a good flow, and really a certified classic !!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    The first half of the book leaves a lot to be desired, and Weis & Hickman try to cram way too many characters into the story (leaving many of them pretty under-developed and one-dimensional). That said, it really picks up near the end, and left me wanting to jump into the next book in the series. The reason I got into the book in the first place was because I was in the mood for dragons, and Dragons of Autumn Twilight does not disappoint.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margret

    3.5 stars very enjoyable and classic

  27. 5 out of 5

    Artemas

    Solid three star rating for this one, but I'm giving it an extra star just because this book lured so many young readers into the fantasy genre.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carmine

    Il lato oscuro degli anni '80 Terrificante coacervo di cliché sparati all'impazzata da tutte le direzioni con ruspante allegria; e a seguire botti strani, rumori, resurrezioni random e schiavisti che maltrattano gli schiavi perché, giustamente, sono schiavi. Il tutto narrato con uno stile plastico che, al confronto, la lettura del contratto Tim vanta maggior scorrevolezza. Non si discute lo status di cult a cui la saga è assurta in quel periodo; il problema vero è la colpa di aver ulteriormente e Il lato oscuro degli anni '80 Terrificante coacervo di cliché sparati all'impazzata da tutte le direzioni con ruspante allegria; e a seguire botti strani, rumori, resurrezioni random e schiavisti che maltrattano gli schiavi perché, giustamente, sono schiavi. Il tutto narrato con uno stile plastico che, al confronto, la lettura del contratto Tim vanta maggior scorrevolezza. Non si discute lo status di cult a cui la saga è assurta in quel periodo; il problema vero è la colpa di aver ulteriormente esacerbato il filone comprendente la pletora di opere simil-tolkeniane. Oggi quello che è resta è una storia invecchiata malissimo e con poco da dire, nonostante si inserisca in quel fisiologico processo di saturazione che costringerà gli autori futuri a esplorare nuove vie.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeff LaSala

    This is fantasy at some of its best. Not only is this the first book in a wonderful saga, some of its characters are enduring and captivating, still memorable so many years later. Even though it wasn't written to be YA fiction, it's an easy fit for young readers. Dragons of Autumn Twilight is what all YA fiction should strive to be like. Morally uplifting and evocative.

  30. 4 out of 5

    11811 (Eleven)

    When I found this in 1986, it may as well have been the Bible.

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