Hot Best Seller

Learning Android

Availability: Ready to download

Want to build apps for Android devices? This book is the perfect way to master the fundamentals. Written by an expert who's taught this mobile platform to hundreds of developers in large organizations, this gentle introduction shows experienced object-oriented programmers how to use Android’s basic building blocks to create user interfaces, store data, connect to the netwo Want to build apps for Android devices? This book is the perfect way to master the fundamentals. Written by an expert who's taught this mobile platform to hundreds of developers in large organizations, this gentle introduction shows experienced object-oriented programmers how to use Android’s basic building blocks to create user interfaces, store data, connect to the network, and more. You'll build a Twitter-like application throughout the course of this book, adding new features with each chapter. Along the way, you'll also create your own toolbox of code patterns to help you program any type of Android application with ease. Get an overview of the Android platform and discover how it fits into the mobile ecosystem Learn about the Android stack, including its application framework, and the structure and distribution of application packages (APK) Set up your Android development environment and get started with simple programs Use Android’s building blocks—Activities, Intents, Services, Content Providers, and Broadcast Receivers Learn how to build basic Android user interfaces and organize UI elements in Views and Layouts Build a service that uses a background process to update data in your application Get an introduction to Android Interface Definition Language (AIDL) and the Native Development Kit (NDK)


Compare

Want to build apps for Android devices? This book is the perfect way to master the fundamentals. Written by an expert who's taught this mobile platform to hundreds of developers in large organizations, this gentle introduction shows experienced object-oriented programmers how to use Android’s basic building blocks to create user interfaces, store data, connect to the netwo Want to build apps for Android devices? This book is the perfect way to master the fundamentals. Written by an expert who's taught this mobile platform to hundreds of developers in large organizations, this gentle introduction shows experienced object-oriented programmers how to use Android’s basic building blocks to create user interfaces, store data, connect to the network, and more. You'll build a Twitter-like application throughout the course of this book, adding new features with each chapter. Along the way, you'll also create your own toolbox of code patterns to help you program any type of Android application with ease. Get an overview of the Android platform and discover how it fits into the mobile ecosystem Learn about the Android stack, including its application framework, and the structure and distribution of application packages (APK) Set up your Android development environment and get started with simple programs Use Android’s building blocks—Activities, Intents, Services, Content Providers, and Broadcast Receivers Learn how to build basic Android user interfaces and organize UI elements in Views and Layouts Build a service that uses a background process to update data in your application Get an introduction to Android Interface Definition Language (AIDL) and the Native Development Kit (NDK)

30 review for Learning Android

  1. 3 out of 5

    Christopher Litsinger

    Up through chapter 10, this book is nearly perfect- with a thoughtfully chosen example application built up from nothing, logically introducing concepts as they are needed- the origins of the book as a training class are clearly visible. Unfortunately, in chapter 10 (which introduces databases) the quality of the code fragments goes down- I like to actually type in the code as shown in the book, which reinforces the concepts for me. Unfortunately the code shown in the book at this point is incomp Up through chapter 10, this book is nearly perfect- with a thoughtfully chosen example application built up from nothing, logically introducing concepts as they are needed- the origins of the book as a training class are clearly visible. Unfortunately, in chapter 10 (which introduces databases) the quality of the code fragments goes down- I like to actually type in the code as shown in the book, which reinforces the concepts for me. Unfortunately the code shown in the book at this point is incomplete, so I had to download the samples from the book site and compare. This was frustrating to say the least, and slowed me down significantly. That said, this book does cover just about everything you're going to need to know to write Android apps, and does so in a pretty clear well thought out way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rishiyur Nikhil

    This is a reasonably good book to get you started on Android app development. I like the approach: uses a non-trivial app (a Twitter-like client, complete with updates, logins, preferences, continuous background downloading of tweets, etc.), and explains concepts in the concept of developing the app. The app is developed incrementally, so that you have something simple and limited running very soon, and then this is continuously refined with more functionality. All the code, and the development e This is a reasonably good book to get you started on Android app development. I like the approach: uses a non-trivial app (a Twitter-like client, complete with updates, logins, preferences, continuous background downloading of tweets, etc.), and explains concepts in the concept of developing the app. The app is developed incrementally, so that you have something simple and limited running very soon, and then this is continuously refined with more functionality. All the code, and the development environment, are downloadable from the Web, so you can learn by actually doing. If you don't know Java or any object-oriented programming, and if you've never used an IDE (Integrated Development Environment) before, you may struggle to follow the book. (Here, and in Android in general, one uses Java and the Eclipse IDE). I actually bought this book because it was recommended for a course I had signed up for, but in going through the book in advance, I felt I didn't need that classroom course after all, i.e., the book is pretty self-contained and followable on its own. There are still some typos in the book (even though it's not the first edition), and like any fast-moving target like Android, the book is some versions behind the latest Android release, and so there are some inconsistencies with the current situation. But I didn't think any of those differences were a show-stopper.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    Good book to learn Android programming. Marko covers all of the basic pieces of an Android app and gives you a great point to jump off into the wide world of Android Programming. It is refreshing to have a book that walks you through a single project as it is often difficult to understand how to use a technology when a book just gives a thousand separate examples of code. The book contained many errors that caused some head banging against the wall for a few minutes here and there. His code was Good book to learn Android programming. Marko covers all of the basic pieces of an Android app and gives you a great point to jump off into the wide world of Android Programming. It is refreshing to have a book that walks you through a single project as it is often difficult to understand how to use a technology when a book just gives a thousand separate examples of code. The book contained many errors that caused some head banging against the wall for a few minutes here and there. His code was inconsistent probably due to not having a good book editor when he released the second edition. Hopefully in the future Marko will do a better job of not releasing with so many errors by getting some better readers to test out the book. Overall I enjoyed the book and recommend it is a good starting point for Android.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elie De Brauwer

    The first chapters and the intention of this book is really good. You are guided through the creation of a an Android app. However at a certain point in time you start bumping into issues, code fragments which are wrong, which introduce components out of the blue, simple copy-paste errors .... which makes it impossible to follow building the application by using the book alone and you need to start diffing with the original code of the book to find your errors. This first half of this book can I The first chapters and the intention of this book is really good. You are guided through the creation of a an Android app. However at a certain point in time you start bumping into issues, code fragments which are wrong, which introduce components out of the blue, simple copy-paste errors .... which makes it impossible to follow building the application by using the book alone and you need to start diffing with the original code of the book to find your errors. This first half of this book can I had a 'this book is fscking awesome' impression, but once you get to chapter 10, you really learn to debug ;).

  5. 3 out of 5

    Alex Moskalyuk

    It was alright, but the idea behind this book is to create this Twitter-updating and reading application, thus going through the steps of designing activities, rewriting some later as AsyncTasks, rewriting some later as services, designing layouts and understanding Android through a hands-on project. I don't really like these monolithic projects, as the book then must be read continuously, and some of the projects are quite contrived, just because the author is too married to the implementation. It was alright, but the idea behind this book is to create this Twitter-updating and reading application, thus going through the steps of designing activities, rewriting some later as AsyncTasks, rewriting some later as services, designing layouts and understanding Android through a hands-on project. I don't really like these monolithic projects, as the book then must be read continuously, and some of the projects are quite contrived, just because the author is too married to the implementation. Couple more problems with this edition: - Twitter changed their API model, so most of the API code is deprecated or not working - Android toolkit for Eclipse got much nicer layout editors, so you don't have to fuss around with layouts as much

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mosborne01

    If you've grown beyond the kind of drag and drop programming that a tool like App Inventor offers and you want to take a step up into the world of Android app creation, this is a good jumping off point. It takes one through a range of different projects, including creating a Twitter client, writing to and reading databases, using GPS and the compass.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kasra

    It's a very useful book. I learned many things as a fresh Android learner. More importantly using real life example and building one application throughout the book is the one the advantages of this book. Though, in the last two chapters the author didn't explain about the code and mostly is source codes with no proper explanation of details.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luciano Palma

    This is a good book for getting your hands on Android. It requires a basic knowledge of Java (which makes sense) and is very practical - the concepts are introduced during a "hands on" construction of an application (Twitter-like client), so the reading will be fun for those who enjoy the "learn by doing" approach.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    This is a great book for an introduction to the core concepts for Android programming. The example application developed throughout touches on most of the things you need to know about the Android system and builds up in a logical and easy to follow manner. This book doesn't focus on graphics or more advanced topics, but would be a great starting point anyone with a little Java experience.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    The example code in this book involves deprecated calls, so the "Yamba" application you build won't actually work unless you figure out how to work around the bad code. This may not be easy for someone who's a beginner, the target market of this book. If it weren't for this problem I'd rate this book quite highly.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Charles

    A lot of great information, but very focused on the specific application (Twitter-like client), including using a pre-developed library.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paweł

    The idea was great but there were too many mistakes and inconsistencies (mainly in the code snippets) for me to finish the book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Slava

    Good for beginners.

  14. 3 out of 5

    Veer Shrivastav

    nothing..

  15. 5 out of 5

    Purbo

    An easy guide for those who want to learn Android.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I'm only on page 12 and already the typos and language usage are annoying me. Was there really an editor for this book?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kaloyan Roussev

    A decent introductory book to Android Programming

  18. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Luna

    Good stuff. Lots of code included.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Johan Roets

    good intro, but loads of mistakes and gaps

  20. 3 out of 5

    Anita

    I liked the idea of this book. Unfortunately the implementation was poor and confusing because of all the errors and hasty explanations. Books should be proofread before publishing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luan Nguyen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Donald Heppner

    Most of the examples don't work, but a good set of topics.

  23. 3 out of 5

    Ajay Dewari

  24. 3 out of 5

    Daniel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rob Prouse

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  27. 3 out of 5

    Vinicius Ramos

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

  29. 3 out of 5

    Kamran

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jared

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.